4,610 research outputs found

    Musical gestures and embodied cognition

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    In this keynote, musical gestures will be discussed in relation to the basic concepts of the embodied music cognition paradigm. Video examples are given of stud- ies and applications that are based on these concepts.

    Action-based effects on music perception

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    The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral processes. In contrast, embodied accounts of music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework that captures the ways in which the human motor system and its actions can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The cornerstone of this framework is the common coding theory, postulating a representational overlap in the brain between the planning, the execution, and the perception of movement. The integration of action and perception in so-called internal models is explained as a result of associative learning processes. Characteristic of internal models is that they allow intended or perceived sensory states to be transferred into corresponding motor commands (inverse modeling), and vice versa, to predict the sensory outcomes of planned actions (forward modeling). Embodied accounts typically refer to inverse modeling to explain action effects on music perception (Leman, 2007). We extend this account by pinpointing forward modeling as an alternative mechanism by which action can modulate perception. We provide an extensive overview of recent empirical evidence in support of this idea. Additionally, we demonstrate that motor dysfunctions can cause perceptual disabilities, supporting the main idea of the paper that the human motor system plays a functional role in auditory perception. The finding that music perception is shaped by the human motor system and its actions suggests that the musical mind is highly embodied. However, we advocate for a more radical approach to embodied (music) cognition in the sense that it needs to be considered as a dynamical process, in which aspects of action, perception, introspection, and social interaction are of crucial importance

    Music Cognition and Cultural Meaning

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    This project will analyze the new trend in musicology of understanding music as cultural metaphor in terms of cognitive theories on how musical meaning is created, specifically through the work of Candace Brower. Brower\u27s theory states that meaning in music is created through bodily metaphor; image schemas of basic human experiences like walking and perceiving space are mapped onto music, which allows meaning to develop. This theory will be applied to the larger-scale cultural metaphors of New Musicology, which approaches music through the lens of how it interacts with and reflects different cultural ideas and values. The project will attempt to discover how bodily metaphor as a basis for meaning reflects on music\u27s function as a cultural metaphor

    Teaching Balinese Gamelan Outside Bali: a Discussion of Pedagogic Issues

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    This article explains the uses of a gamelan semara dana in the teaching program of an Australian university. Seven topic areas are discussed: learning different patutan; moving between patutan within a piece of music; substitution of gongan; adding instruments to the gamelan; uses of the trompong; acts of music cognition; and uses of the gamelan in new, hybrid works. To conclude the article, the Balinese concept of desa-kala-patra is applied to this situation to read potential meanings of the presence and uses of a Balinese gamelan in an Australian setting. Keywords: Pedagogy, gamelan semara dana, music cognition, and teacher trainin

    The Sound of Music: Externalist Style

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    Philosophical exploration of individualism and externalism in the cognitive sciences most recently has been focused on general evaluations of these two views (Adams & Aizawa 2008, Rupert 2008, Wilson 2004, Clark 2008). Here we return to broaden an earlier phase of the debate between individualists and externalists about cognition, one that considered in detail particular theories, such as those in developmental psychology (Patterson 1991) and the computational theory of vision (Burge 1986, Segal 1989). Music cognition is an area in the cognitive sciences that has received little attention from philosophers, though it has relatively recently been thrown into the externalist spotlight (Cochrane 2008, Kruger 2014, Kersten forthcoming). Given that individualism can be thought of as a kind of paradigm for research on cognition, we provide a brief overview of the field of music cognition and individualistic tendencies within the field (sections 2 and 3) before turning to consider externalist alternatives to individualistic paradigms (section 4-5) and then arguing for a qualified form of externalism about music cognition (section 6)

    Guest Editor’s Introduction April 2023

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    One of the most commonly reported reasons for listening to music is simply because people find it enjoyable (Sanflippo et al., 2020). Despite aesthetic appreciation playing an important role in the motivation to listen to music, aesthetic responses to music have not been investigated as frequently as in other types of artistic modalities. This is perhaps due to the history of the field of music perception and cognition, which has traditionally focused more on basic perceptual functions and components of music, such as perception of pitch and rhythm, rather than aesthetic aspects of music listening. At this point, the study of music cognition and perception has spanned several decades, and music cognition is beginning to firmly establish itself as a key subfield within cognitive psychology and neuroscience more broadly. While the study of music cognition has continued to grow, it has done so somewhat in parallel with the psychology of aesthetics, creativity, and the arts. Although the two research communities (that is, music cognition and empirical aesthetics) study similar topics using similar methods, the level of interaction between the two communities has been less than what one might expect. This could in part be due to the fact that the study of aesthetics tends to come from an academic tradition that is often considered to refer more specifically to the visual arts or visual stimuli more broadly (e.g., Arnheim, 1966; Berlyne, 1971), or at least that may be the perception researchers have of the work done under the banner of the psychology of aesthetic

    Music cognition as mental time travel.

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    As we experience a temporal flux of events our expectations of future events change. Such expectations seem to be central to our perception of affect in music, but we have little understanding of how expectations change as recent information is integrated. When music establishes a pitch centre (tonality), we rapidly learn to anticipate its continuation. What happens when anticipations are challenged by new events? Here we show that providing a melodic challenge to an established tonality leads to progressive changes in the impact of the features of the stimulus on listeners' expectations. The results demonstrate that retrospective analysis of recent events can establish new patterns of expectation that converge towards probabilistic interpretations of the temporal stream. These studies point to wider applications of understanding the impact of information flow on future prediction and its behavioural utility

    Embodied music cognition in vocal performance

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