707,743 research outputs found

    Does My Hair Bother You? Part 1

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    “It’s AMAZING that it’s considered revolutionary to wear my hair the way it grows out of my head…” – Tracie Thoms I don’t wear my natural hair because I want to join the “revolutionary movement” that has recently swept across our nation. I’m not desperately seeking to get in touch with my roots. Nor do I desire to be acknowledged as the soulful “sista” that eats, sleeps and breathes “Black Power“. I wear my natural hair because I was naive enough to ignore warnings of the effects that Gettysburg’s harsh water would have on my “black hair”. So it fell out. Simple as that. [excerpt

    Take My People to the Top

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    “…but what I really want to do is help the black people, especially the young black girls…” Did she just say that? Wait, can she say that? Is she wrong for feeling that way? I wonder how other people would feel it they knew she felt this way? So many questions began to run through my mind, but my reaction? I just sat there, nodding. Her body language told me even she knew there was something controversial about what she was saying. Not to mention that she whispered it, you know, the old hand over the mouth gesture. [excerpt

    Fearless: Nadejiah Towns

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    This week we would like to recognize Nadejiah Towns ’15 as a fearless fighter against poverty. This summer she has served as a Heston intern for the South Central Community Action Program (SCCAP) and has spent the majority of her time with the Work Ready program, a “welfare to work” organization that helps low-income community members gain the skills needed to by obtaining a reliable, professional job and become self-sufficient

    Urbanization and species occupancy frequency distribution patterns in core zone areas of European towns

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    More and more of the globe is becoming urbanized. Thus, characterizing the distribution and abundance of species occupying different towns is critically important. The primary aim of this study was to examine the effect of urbanization and latitude on the patterns of species occupancy frequency distribution (SOFD) in urban core zones of European towns (38 towns) along a 3850-km latitudinal gradient. We determined which of the three most common distributional models (unimodal-satellite dominant, bimodal symmetrical, and bimodal asymmetrical) provides the best fit for urban bird communities using the AICc-model selection procedure. Our pooled data exhibited a unimodal-satellite SOFD pattern. This result is inconsistent with the results from previous studies that have been conducted in more natural habitats, where data have mostly exhibited a bimodal SOFD pattern. Large-sized towns exhibited a bimodal symmetric pattern, whereas smaller-sized towns followed a unimodal-satellite dominated SOFD pattern. The difference in environmental diversity is the most plausible explanation for this observation because habitat diversity of the study plots decreased as urbanization increased. Southern towns exhibited unimodal satellite SOFD patterns, central European towns exhibited bimodal symmetric, and northern towns exhibited bimodal asymmetric SOFD patterns. One explanation for this observation is that urbanization is a more recent phenomenon in the north than in the south. Therefore, more satellite species are found in northern towns than in southern towns. We found that core species in European towns are widely distributed, and their regional population sizes are large. Our results indicated that earlier urbanized species are more common in towns than the species that have urbanized later. We concluded that both the traits of bird species and characteristics of towns modified the SOFD patterns of urban-breeding birds. In the future, it would be interesting to study how the urban history impacts SOFD patterns and if the SOFD patterns of wintering and breeding assemblages are the same

    Developing 2015 High-Resolution Impervious Cover Estimates for the 52 Towns in the Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership: Final Report

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    Estimates of 2015 impervious cover (IC) for the 52 towns of the Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership (PREP) were generated from 2015 1-foot imagery (for the 42 towns in NH) and 2015 1-meter NAIP imagery (for the 10 towns in Maine). The 2015 IC mapping updated previous high resolution mapping developed from 2010 (New Hampshire) and 2011 (Maine) orthophotography for the study area. Impervious features covered 32,462 acres (5.8% of the land area) in the New Hampshire towns and 13,295 acres (5.3% of the land area) in the Maine towns, with a total of 46,634 (5.6% of the land area) acres mapped in the entire study area. The towns with the highest percent impervious cover in 2015 were in New Hampshire, and included Portsmouth (26.7%), New Castle (20.0%), and Seabrook (20.0%). The largest increases in IC between 2010 and 2015 occurred in Rochester, NH (122 acres), Wells, ME (64 acres), and Seabrook, NH (64 acres). Minimal amounts of IC increases occurred in most towns, with the least amounts in Madbury, NH (4 acres), New Castle, NH (2 acres), and Brookfield, NH (2 acres)

    Population Growth and Other Statistics of Middle-sized Irish Towns. General Research Series Paper No. 85, April 1976

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    The basic aim of the study is the presentation of tables of comparative statistical data relating to 97 towns with population 5OO-1O,OOO in 1971 and analyses of such data. The exclusion of the four County Boroughs and Dun Laoghaire together with twelve other large towns and all small towns and villages, was to impart a degree of homogeneity to the inquiry, as regards function of town. The 97 towns range from Mullingar, the largest with a population of 9,245 to Cootehill with 1,542

    Prussia disaggregated : the demography of its universe of localities in 1871

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    We provide, for the first time, a detailed and comprehensive overview of the demography of more than 50,000 towns, villages, and manors in 1871 Prussia. We study religion, literacy, fertility, and group segregation by location type (town, village, and manor). We find that Jews live predominantly in towns. Villages and manors are substantially segregated by denomination, whereas towns are less segregated. Yet, we find relatively lower levels of segregation by literacy. Regression analyses with county-fixed effects show that a larger share of Protestants is associated with higher literacy rates across all location types. A larger share of Jews relative to Catholics is not significantly associated with higher literacy in towns, but it is in villages and manors. Finally, a larger share of Jews is associated with lower fertility in towns, which is not explained by differences in literacy

    What a Sunday School Convention Can Do

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    Benefits of a Sunday School Contest

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    Developing 2010 High-Resolution Impervious Cover Estimates for Selected Towns in the Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership: Final Report

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    Estimates of 2010 impervious cover (New Hampshire) and 2011 impervious cover (Maine) were generated to extend the coverage of previous work in Rockingham and Strafford Counties, New Hampshire, to include all of the Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership (PREP) footprint. The newly mapped area comprised the town of Alton in Belknap County, New Hampshire, the towns of Brookfield, Wakefield, and Wolfeboro in Carroll County, New Hampshire, and the towns of Acton, Berwick, Eliot, Kittery, Lebanon, North Berwick, Sanford, Shapleigh, South Berwick, Wells, and York in York County, Maine1. With these new data, standardized, high resolution impervious cover estimates are now available for the entire PREP watershed. Impervious features covered 3,026 acres (2.7%) in the New Hampshire towns and 13,612 acres (4.9%) in the Maine towns, with a total of 16,637 (4.3%) acres mapped in the entire study area. As expected, the more urbanized towns of Kittery (11.3%), Sanford (7.9%), Eliot (7.0%), and York (6.2%) contained the highest percentage of impervious cover
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