1,468,751 research outputs found

    A Jurisprudence of Insurgency: Lawyers as Companions of Unimagined Change

    Get PDF
    The purpose of this study has been to describe and analyze how seven Swedish preschool teachers and two special education teachers think and work with children who show a lack of social skills. The study method has been semi-structured interviews with the educators which have been analyzed and sorted under different themes/categories. The theoretical framework used in this study is sociocultural, relational and categorical perspectives. These perspectives have been chosen in order to better understand how teachers see their role in supporting children in need of special support. The environment in the preschool is found to be of great help and the teachers’ approach is of great importance.The research emphasizes the importance of integrating thinking, feeling and behavior. Social skills are an important part of the pre-school assignment. The children have to learn how to¨cooperate and empathize with others. The result of the study shows that children’s skills in playing and taking turns are the biggest issues in the daily activities. The teachers see an important task in helping children achieve social competence and helping children translate their emotions. The special education team assists greatly in the preschool teachers’ work with children in need of special support

    The Role of Sports Teachers and Parents in Adaptive Physical Education Learning in Children with Special Needs: Case Study

    Get PDF
    This study aims to determine how big the teacher's role is in the development of adaptive physical education in children with special needs. This research was conducted at SLB D/D1 YPAC Surakarta. The population and sample in this study were two sports teachers and three parents of children with special needs. Questionnaires and interviews are the sampling techniques in this study. This study uses a quantitative descriptive method. The technical steps of data analysis in this study include data reduction, data verification, and conclusion. The results of this study are that sports teachers play a bigger role than parents of children with special needs. The percentage of the role of sports teachers is 55% while the parents of students are 45%. Aspects of learning methods carried out by teachers and parents belong to a good category. Meanwhile, the aspect of learning modification carried out by sports teachers is more creative and innovative because it uses tools that can support the achievement of learning objectives. Moral support provided by sports teachers at schools to children with special needs is one of the things that children with special needs need in carrying out adaptive physical learning. In addition, the role of sports teachers in guiding and supporting children with special needs has a wider relationship than parents. Moral support provided by sports teachers at schools to children with special needs is one of the things that children with special needs need in carrying out adaptive physical learning. In addition, the role of sports teachers in guiding and supporting children with special needs has a wider relationship than parents. Moral support provided by sports teachers at schools to children with special needs is one of the things that children with special needs need in carrying out adaptive physical learning. In addition, the role of sports teachers in guiding and supporting children with special needs has a wider relationship than parents

    Special Needs Adoptive Families: A Study of Social Supports and Family Functioning

    Get PDF
    As a result of recent federal initiatives, more children have become available for adoption, and many of these children enter their new families with a variety of "special needs." Special needs adoptees have been defined as "children who have experienced physical or sexual abuse and/or severe neglect; children with physical or emotional disabilities; children who are older than one year; and children who are members of a sibling group who are placed together with the same adoptive family" (Mullin & Johnson, 1999, p. 590). Often, special needs adoptive children evidence psychological and emotional difficulties that can be very challenging to the adoptive family. These children and their families may require a number of services and different types of support to assist with the transition of integrating the adopted child into the family and to assist family members as they move through new developmental stages. In addition, parents' needs for support may vary based on the special needs of the adopted child and/or may vary based on their prior experiences (or lack of) as foster parents or adoptive parents. This study used Urie Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Theory (1977, 1988, 1989) as a framework to conceptualize the study of social supports in special needs adoptive families. An ecological perspective recognizes the role of the environment in familial development and recognizes that the family is a complex system that interacts with other complex systems. Differences in support availability, use, need, and helpfulness were examined based on 125 parents' reports. One-way ANOVAs revealed significant differences in support needs based on parent experience and special need categories of children. Parents with foster and/or adoptive experience reported higher availability of supports overall than parents without experience. Parents without foster or adoptive experience reported lower use and higher need of supports overall than parents with experience. Parents of children with physical/developmental disabilities reported higher use of services overall than parents of children with behavioral/emotional disabilities/difficulties or parents of children with both types of disabilities/difficulties. Significant correlations were found between support availability and the Family Environment Scale (FES) subscale of Conflict and support need and the FES subscale of Conflict, suggesting a relationship between family environment and supports

    Competency level of parents of children with special needs in providing assistance for acquiring self-care skills

    Get PDF
    This research aimed to determine the competency level of parents of children with special needs in providing assistance for acquiring self-care skills, the challenges they face, and their demographic profile. The study utilized a descriptive research design, including both survey questionnaires and focus group discussions. The participants consisted of 50 parents of children with special needs, ages 7 to 14, residing in Ilocos Norte, Philippines. The results showed that mothers played a significant role in providing direct assistance to their children. Secondly, parents in the age group of 35-54 may face additional challenges in managing caregiving responsibilities. Moreover, parents with low levels of education and limited financial resources may face additional barriers in accessing resources to support their child's development. The competency assessment revealed that parents may need additional support in some areas, particularly in growth and development and toileting practices. The study recommends thatpolicymakers, educators, and healthcare professionals collaborate to create and implement programs that provide parents with the support and resources they need to care for their children. This research highlights the need for more support and resources for families of children with special needs

    A systematic review of interactions in pedagogical approaches with reported outcomes for the academic and social inclusion of pupils with special educational needs

    Get PDF
    From the introduction/background: The growing demand for inclusive practices within mainstream schools has resulted in classroom teachers having to take direct responsibility for the individual learning needs of all pupils within the setting, and reduced the expectation that support staff should be the primary practitioners for children with special educational needs (SEN). The belief in a need for special pedagogical approaches for these children has also been widely critiqued (e.g. Norwich and Lewis, 2001; Hart, 1996) and there has been a growing focus upon the teaching practices that can be, and are, more broadly used by mainstream practitioners. Central to all these approaches are the interactions that both create the learning context and operate within it

    FROM TEACHERS AND FAMILY TO COMMUNITY: WHAT SUPPORT IS AVAILABLE FOR OUR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

    Get PDF
    One of the most pressing issues that most countries, including Malaysia and Singapore, are facing today is meeting the needs of their children with special needs. Teachers in mainstream schools (as well as special schools) have seen more and more children with special needs in their regular classroom settings and these children are unable to cope with the regular curriculum. Families with children with special needs are also desperate for help from the schools their children are attending as they are unable to cope with them at home. As the community begins to see more and more children with special needs in their midst, there is now a conscious awareness of the need to provide adequate services and appropriate resources to support these children. In this paper, the authors have attempted to raise this issue by exploring and questioning what kind of support teachers, family and community can provide in terms of services and resources for children with special needs, if there is, indeed, such a support available.   Article visualizations

    A systematic review of whole class, subject based, pedagogies with reported outcomes for the academic and social inclusion of pupils with special educational needs in mainstream classrooms

    Get PDF
    Schools across the world have responded to international and national initiatives designed to further the development of inclusive education. In England, there is a statutory requirement for all schools to provide effective learning opportunities for all pupils (QCA, 2000) and children with special educational needs (SEN) are positioned as having a right to be within mainstream classrooms accessing an appropriate curriculum (SENDA, 2001). Previous reviews which have sought to identify classroom practices that support the inclusion of children with SEN have been technically non-systematic and hence a need for a systematic review within this area has been identified (Nind et al., 2004; Rix et al., 2006). This systematic literature review is the last in a series of three

    通級指導教室における コミュニケーションに困難のある児童の支援 1 ―通級による指導の役割と今後の課題―

    Get PDF
    The framework for children who need special support in school education has changed from “special education” to “special support education” since the revision of the School Education Law in 2007. In the course of this change, “resource room education”, which had not been recognized as part of the formal education system, has been attracting attention as a system that plays a central role in “special needs education.” The aim of this paper is to clarify the role of resource room education and its future issues by sorting out the development and transition of the system for children with both language and developmental disabilities who are taking advantage of resource rooms. Resource room education was initiated in the early 1950s by teachers as extracurricular classes for children with language disabilities who had difficulty in reading or speaking in class. After that, a more systematic “resource room for children with speech and language disorders” was established, but the actual situation was that guidance was not given in a fixed class in the resource room but was instead given at the regular class level. On the other hand, since the Act on Support for Persons with Development Disabilities was enacted in 2005, children with developmental disabilities, such as ADHD (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder) and LD (learning disabilities), who had not been recipients of the type of support until then, also began to receive special support education. Today inclusive education has become part of a standard educational system, and the resource room education is a very effective educational system for children with developmental disabilities and other special needs as well as language disorders

    Mission impossible? Finnish itinerant early childhood special education teachers’ views of their work and working conditions

    Get PDF
    ABSTRACT: Providing support to children in their younger years is prominent in Finnish early childhood education and care (ECEC), as most children need some form of support for learning and development during this stage. Itinerant early childhood special education teachers (ECSETs) are important resources in providing support to children with special educational needs (SEN). Previous research in Finland addresses areas where itinerant ECSETs predominantly work in contexts where Finnish is the medium of instruction. Therefore, it is of interest to examine itinerant ECSETs' views of elements affecting their work with supporting children with SEN in Swedish-medium ECEC settings. This research is explorative to its character and data was collected through a questionnaire sent to all itinerant ECSETs working in Swedish-speaking regions of Finland. Descriptive statistics were used to depict the work conditions for ECSETs'. The results show that ECSETs own professional ambition and children’s support needs affect the work the most. Furthermore, inequality in ECSETs working conditions have direct consequences for practice. This study concludes with a discussion of how ECSETs' working conditions influence the support that children receive and areas that should be addressed to ensure equal and efficient learning for all children

    Identifying the educational and social needs of children with specific speech and language difficulties on entry to secondary school

    Get PDF
    Movement from KS2 to KS3 creates a number of challenges for pupils. For children with additional learning needs the change of academic pace, social contacts and, typically, school may pose additional problems. This change may be particularly problematic for children with specific speech and language difficulties (SSLD). This study examines the ways in which parents, pupils and teachers appraise this transition prior to secondary transfer (Year 6) and during the first year of secondary school (Yr7) for a cohort of children with a history of specific language impairment. The use of comparison groups provides the opportunity to discriminate between factors related to a) change of school b) special educational needs generally and c) language difficulties specifically. Children with SSLD were initially identified in Year 3 (N=69), with the majority of pupils in mainstream settings. In Year 6 (mean age 10; 3) children were assessed on a range of language literacy and cognitive measures and the views of their parents’ and teachers’ about needs, curriculum differentiation and support established. Teachers were also asked to consider the difficulties that the children might experience on entry to secondary school. During Year 7 data were collected from form tutors, SENCOs and secondary subject specialists. Perceptions of need are compared with level of need as evidenced by standardised assessments. A critical analysis of the ways in which these children’s needs are addressed in the secondary school system is provided and the paper outlines current strengths and gaps in provision
    corecore