5,277 research outputs found

    Lichens of larch Larix sp. in places of the Podlasie province (NE Poland)

    Get PDF
    The paper presents the results of the research on the composition of lichen species of larch in the towns of Podlasie. 29 species of lichenicolous fungi have been recorded. A synthesis of epiphytic lichen biota of larch in Poland has been made. Despite the homogeneity of the substrate, the lichen biota of larch in Poland according to our own data and literature amounts to 107 species, some of which are rare. The richest lichen biota of larch in Poland occurs in mountainous areas. Many species that inhabit the bark of that phorophyte belong to the species extinct in Poland

    Lichen diversity in the managed forests of the Karnieszewice Forest Division and its surroundings (N Poland)

    Get PDF
    The lichen biota of the Karnieszewice Forest Division (N Poland) is presented. Despite it is predominantly a strongly managed woodland area, 270 lichen species were found there including many rare species for Poland, as well as for European Lowland. Near 20% of the whole lichen biota are considered to be threatened in the country (categories CR, EN, VU), and 34 species are protected by law in Poland. Agonimia flabelliformis is reported for the second time from Polish lowlands

    The lichen biota of the Drawieński National Park (NW Poland, Western Pomerania)

    Get PDF
    The whole known lichen biota of the Drawieński National Park is presented. In total 290 species (262 lichenized, 25 lichenicolous and 3 lichen-related, saprotrophic fungi) are listed. Trichonectria anisospora and Milospium lacoizquetae are reported as new to Poland. Lecanora stenotropa and Phaeophyscia pusilloides are reported for the first time from Polish lowlands. The most lichenologically interesting and richest habitat complexes are the river valleys with their beech slope forests, their alluvial forests and their fast running rivers. Further habitats of high nature conservation value are roadside trees and pine forests, which inhabit a rich lichen biota as well.

    The lichens of the northern shore of the Gulf of Finland in the limits of St. Petersburg, Russia – diversity on the edge of the megapolis

    Get PDF
    We present a lichen checklist for the northern shore of the Gulf of Finland in the limits of St. Petersburg, Russia. This area has diverse lichen biota within the city limits, and has been comprehensively studied since 1893, which gives a good base for analysis of historical changes in lichen diversity. The documented lichen biota comprises 469 species (430 lichenized, 24 lichenicolous, 3 facultatively lichenicolous, and 12 non-lichenized saprobic fungi), of them 191 species are known from herbaria and literature for the period before 1991, and 436 species were recorded since 1991 to 2019. Thirty-three taxa were excluded from the lichen list of the study area as erroneous or dubious records. Altogether 48 species are new to St. Petersburg, including: Lecidea malmeana and Micarea czarnotae – new to Russia; Caloplaca lucifuga, Gyalecta nigricans, Micarea soralifera – new to European Russia; Agonimia flabelliformis, Endococcus verrucosus, Lecania turicensis, Micarea fallax, M. tomentosa, Xanthomendoza huculica – new to Northwestern European Russia; Lichenoconium lichenicola, Ramalina europaea, Sarcogyne hypophaea – not known also from the Leningrad Region. The studied lichen biota is moderately rich compared to other city territories. The history of economic development of the region has caused its serious transformation, degradation of natural habitats and therefore partial loss of lichen diversity. At the same time, human-made substrates and anthropogenic plant communities are inhabited by lichens, including species unknown in the natural habitats of the study area. However, 44 species recorded in the study area are red-listed in St. Petersburg, with 13 of them known only from historical collections. Forest communities, as well as historical parks, in NW part of St. Petersburg are important source of biodiversity on regional level nowadays and hopefully in future, and deserve protection

    Lichens and their importance for the monitoring of environmental changes in Southern Africa : with special reference to soil-inhabiting lichens.

    Get PDF
    Lichens are the object of investigation within the framework of the BIOTA Southern Africa project, subproject S04 (http://www.biota-africa.org). This interdisciplinary research project, installed in 2000, focuses on the analysis of biodiversity and its changes along climatic and vegetation gradients (transects) in Namibia and in the Republic of South Africa. In the context of this project, studies on the diversity of lichens are carriedout. Special reference is given to the monitoring of lichens growing on soil, which form the so called biological soil crusts.Lichen diversity is assessed and analysed with respect to its spatial and temporal changes. These are related to various abioticand biotic factors such as climate, soil features and land use. The indicator value of certain terricolouslichen taxaand/or lichen groups (communities) is investigated for the study area, and it is intended to use itin a future long-term monitoring programme in the region. In this brochure, we whish to explain what lichens are, how do they live and where do they grow, and why they are so important as bioindicatorsin arid and semi-arid areas of the world. The activities of the S04 subproject along the BIOTA transect are described, as well as the methods used for monitoring environmental changes in Southern Africa using soil-inhabiting lichens

    Changes in the lichen biota of the Lions Rump area, King George Island, Antarctica, over the last 20 years

    Get PDF
    Climate changes observed in recent years in the maritime Antarctic have affected the tundra vegetation, including plant communities in which lichens are a dominant component. The results of comparative studies (1988 and 1990 vs. 2007 and 2008) on the dynamics of the lichen biota within the Antarctic Specially Protected Area No. 151 (King George Island, Antarctica) minimally influenced by human impact, are presented. This long-term experiment is aimed at determining the trends and rate of changes on lichen biota induced by climate warming and rapid deglaciation. The most significant changes affecting the lichen biota have taken place in the forefield of a glacier and on the young moraines where in the second period of studies three species (Polyblastiagothica, Thelenellakerguelena, Thelocarponcyaneum) were not refound. There was also a reduction in the number of other sites for some species (e.g. Leptogiumpuberulum, Staurothellegelida) caused by substrate desiccation. On the other hand, there was an increase in the range of pioneering species (e.g. Bacidiachrysocolla, Caloplacajohnstonii, Candelariellaaurella, Lecanoradispersa) on young moraines recently uncovered by the retreating glacier. The smallest changes were observed on the cliff rocks near penguin colonies

    The lichen biota of three nature reserves in island Saaremaa, Estonia

    Get PDF
    A description of the lichen biota of three nature reserves – Kaugatoma-Lõo, Odalätsi and Viieristi reserves in Saaremaa island, Estonia is presented. In total 404 species are listed, of them 228 are recorded from Kaugatoma-Lõo, 169 from Odalätsi and 167 from Viieristi reserves. The composition of the lichen biota of the reserves reflects the availability of habitats (alvar grasslands, sand dunes, different types of forests) in the area. The share of rare and protected species is the highest in Kaugatoma-Lõo reserve because of the rare in Estonia habitats (thin calcium-rich soils) and substrata (lignum of old, dead junipers). Ramalina elegans, previously considered as extinct in Estonia, was re-found from Odalätsi and Viieristi reserves.

    Lichenes of abandoned zinc-lead mines

    Get PDF
    A list of lichens from areas of zinc-lead ores in Southern Poland and a review of the characteristic lichen biota of these sites is provided. In spite of the devastated and heavy metal contaminated environment, a highly diverse epigeic and epilithic lichen biota was found, including species characteristic of various anthropogenic habitats, particularly zinc and lead enriched substrates (Diploschistes muscorum, Steinia geophana, Sarcosagium campestre, Vezdaea aestivalis and V. leprosa). Also, the high-mountain species Leucocarpia biatorella, as well as very rare in Europe Thelocarpon imperceptum, and several species categorized as very rare, endangered and protected in Poland were recorded. Crustose lichens are the most abundant; among fruticose forms Cladonia spp. predominate and Stereocaulon incrustatum is common

    How was the year 2022 for Folia Cryptogamica Estonica?

    Get PDF
    The current FCE fascicle 59 is full of diverse papers considering new and noteworthy taxon records, updates to red- and checklists, and among other things – lichen biota on hornfels outcrops
    corecore