492 research outputs found

    Point-of-care ultrasound used to exclude penile fracture

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    This is a case report of a superficial penile hematoma that was difficult to distinguish clinically from a penile fracture. Such cases occur with relative frequency, and because definitive treatment is an urgent surgery, timely diagnosis is essential to avoid complications. Typical imaging modalities such as cavernosonography and magnetic resonance imaging can be invasive (cavernosonography) or time consuming (magnetic resonance imaging) and may not be readily available. Ultrasound has been used successfully in such cases, and, in this case, we used point-of-care ultrasound combined with a brief period of observation to exclude penile fracture

    Concert: Ithaca College Choir

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    Transcription-translation coupling: direct interactions of RNA polymerase with ribosomes and ribosomal subunits.

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    In prokaryotes, RNA polymerase and ribosomes can bind concurrently to the same RNA transcript, leading to the functional coupling of transcription and translation. The interactions between RNA polymerase and ribosomes are crucial for the coordination of transcription with translation. Here, we report that RNA polymerase directly binds ribosomes and isolated large and small ribosomal subunits. RNA polymerase and ribosomes form a one-to-one complex with a micromolar dissociation constant. The formation of the complex is modulated by the conformational and functional states of RNA polymerase and the ribosome. The binding interface on the large ribosomal subunit is buried by the small subunit during protein synthesis, whereas that on the small subunit remains solvent-accessible. The RNA polymerase binding site on the ribosome includes that of the isolated small ribosomal subunit. This direct interaction between RNA polymerase and ribosomes may contribute to the coupling of transcription to translation

    Towards a psychology of religion and the environment : the good, the bad, and the mechanisms

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    What is the relationship between religion and care for the natural world? Although this question has motivated research for decades, the evidence is inconsistent. Here, we highlight the psychological mechanisms by which specific features of religious systems may differentially impact environmental beliefs and commitments—positively and negatively—to help generate more targeted questions for future research. Religious traditions that emphasize human dominance over the natural world, promote just-world and end-world beliefs, and are tied to more fundamentalist/conservative attitudes can diminish levels of environmental concern in its adherents. Alternatively, religious and spiritual traditions that moralize the protection of the natural world, sanctify nature, and emphasize belief in human stewardship of the natural world can promote pro-environmental concern and commitments

    Designing hollow nano gold golf balls.

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    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure

    Prospectus, February 2, 2005

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    https://spark.parkland.edu/prospectus_2005/1002/thumbnail.jp

    Incidence, causes and outcomes of lameness cases in a working military horse population: a field study

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    Reasons for performing study: Lameness is a common problem in the horse. Despite this, information on the incidence of lameness in horses in the UK is restricted to studies of lameness in performance horses, racehorses or referral hospital populations. Objectives: To determine the overall incidence and common causes of lameness in a working horse population and incidence, duration and outcome of conditions observed. Study design: Prospective questionnaire study. Methods: Questionnaires were used to record lameness episodes in 294 horses in an equine military establishment. Information recorded included age, years of service, type of work, causal lesion, time taken to return to work and outcome. Lameness problems could be reported by any staff involved in the horses' care and were diagnosed by a veterinary surgeon or qualified farrier. Trends between lame and nonlame populations were compared using Chi-square analysis. Lameness diagnoses were grouped and analysed by disease category. Results: Completed questionnaires for 273 horses were analysed. The mean monthly incidence of lameness was 2.1%, equivalent to an annual rate of 25.4 cases per 100 horses per annum, with a mean of 1.2 lameness episodes per horse in the lame population. Horse age and duration of service were not significantly different between lame and nonlame populations. The most common diagnoses were cellulitis (18.6%), skin wounds (16.3%) and foot/shoeing problems (11.6%) and 88% of cases had returned to previous levels of work by the conclusion of the study. Conclusions: This initial field study showed that lameness is a common occurrence in this working military horse population and the majority of cases make a full return to work. The most common causes of lameness identified in this study and outcomes of these conditions differ from existing literature. Potential relevance: This study highlights the need for further studies of lameness in the wider horse population

    Community-Academic Research Enhances Engaged Scholarship

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    Community-academic research can enhance the capacity of all partners involved. It creates new knowledge that all partners can use, and can inform policy more meaningfully. It also brings engaged scholarship to researchers.York’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit provides services and funding for faculty, graduate students, and community organizations seeking to maximize the impact of academic research and expertise on public policy, social programming, and professional practice. It is supported by SSHRC and CIHR grants, and by the Office of the Vice-President Research & Innovation. [email protected] www.researchimpact.c

    Prospectus, March 2, 2005

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    https://spark.parkland.edu/prospectus_2005/1006/thumbnail.jp
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