24 research outputs found

    Inclusive and Inelastic Scattering in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

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    Neutrino-nucleus cross section measurements can provide both insights into nuclear physics and important data that can be used to improve model predictions used for neutrino oscillation physics. Two measurements of neutrino-nucleus cross sections were performed using data from the MINERvA experiment, each probing different classes of neutrino interactions. Double and single-differential flux-integrated measurements of inclusive charged current neutrino-nucleus cross sections at a peak neutrino energy of 3.5 GeV are presented as a function of the longitudinal and transverse momentum of the muon produced in the interaction. Additionally, an analysis of charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of muon neutrinos was performed in carbon, iron, lead and hydrocarbon in a neutrino beam with a peak energy of 6 GeV. Cross sections were measured in each material, and ratios were also taken between the cross sections of each of the materials and hydrocarbon, allowing for examination of nuclear dependencies of the neutrino cross section. Absolute DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken-x scaling variable were both measured

    Community Life in Rural Nebraska: Results from the 1997 Annual Nebraska Rural Poll

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    This working paper presents findings from the second annual Nebraska Rural Poll. The study is based on 3,264 responses from households in the 87 non-metropolitan counties in the state. The objectives of this paper are to answer the following questions: 1. How do rural Nebraskans perceive changes occurring in their community? 2. How do rural Nebraskans describe their communities: friendly or unfriendly, trusting or distrusting, supportive or hostile? 3. How satisfied are rural Nebraskans with various services and amenities; and how does satisfaction vary by community size, region, household income, age, gender, education and marital status? 4. Do rural Nebraskans believe there is a shortage of affordable housing in their community; and how do they feel this shortage has affected the community’s population and economic growth? 5. How do rural Nebraskans believe the consolidation of public schools, health care and local government would affect the quality of life in their community; and how do these perceptions vary by community size, region, and various individual attributes? 6. How do rural Nebraskans feel that population growth by adding different demographic segments (e.g., elderly residents, young families, members of minority groups) would affect the quality of life in their community

    Community Life in Rural Nebraska: Results from the 1997 Annual Nebraska Rural Poll

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    This working paper presents findings from the second annual Nebraska Rural Poll. The study is based on 3,264 responses from households in the 87 non-metropolitan counties in the state. The objectives of this paper are to answer the following questions: 1. How do rural Nebraskans perceive changes occurring in their community? 2. How do rural Nebraskans describe their communities: friendly or unfriendly, trusting or distrusting, supportive or hostile? 3. How satisfied are rural Nebraskans with various services and amenities; and how does satisfaction vary by community size, region, household income, age, gender, education and marital status? 4. Do rural Nebraskans believe there is a shortage of affordable housing in their community; and how do they feel this shortage has affected the community’s population and economic growth? 5. How do rural Nebraskans believe the consolidation of public schools, health care and local government would affect the quality of life in their community; and how do these perceptions vary by community size, region, and various individual attributes? 6. How do rural Nebraskans feel that population growth by adding different demographic segments (e.g., elderly residents, young families, members of minority groups) would affect the quality of life in their community

    Rural Development Strategies for Nebraska: Results from the 1997 Annual Nebraska Rural Poll

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    This working paper presents findings from the second annual Nebraska Rural Poll. The study is based on 3,264 responses from households in the 87 non-metropolitan counties in the state. The objectives of this paper are to answer the following questions: 1. Do rural Nebraskans generally support policies of state and local governments which provide tax breaks and other financial incentives to businesses that will locate or make a commitment to stay in their state/area? 2. How effective do rural Nebraskans believe the Nebraska Employment and Investment Growth Act and the Nebraska Employment Expansion and Investment Incentive Act have been in helping rural Nebraska? 3. How high a priority do rural Nebraskans feel the following development options should be for the state? • Promote Nebraska agricultural products • Promote the location of manufacturing firms in rural Nebraska • Promote the development of industrial parks in rural Nebraska • Promote the development of retail shopping centers in rural Nebraska • Promote the expansion of existing industries in rural Nebraska • Promote the development of telecommunications networks in rural Nebraska • Promote the development of small businesses in rural Nebraska • Promote tourism in rural Nebrask

    The Rural Workplace and Technology Utilization: Results from the 1997 Annual Nebraska Rural Poll

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    This working paper presents findings from the second annual Nebraska Rural Poll. The study is based on 3,264 responses from households in the 87 non-metropolitan counties in the state. The objectives of this paper are to answer the following questions: 1. What percent of rural Nebraskans have employment, and what is the nature of that employment: full-time? part-time? self-employed? 2. What benefits do rural Nebraskans have at their place of employment? Health insurance? Paid vacation? Other? 3. What is the extent and nature of self-employment in rural Nebraska? 4. What is the extent of telecommuting and the use of various telecommunications technologies in rural Nebraska? Key findings include the following: •&#;Seventy-six percent of the respondents reported having some form of employment in 1996. Of these, sixty-one percent were employed by someone else; twenty percent were self-employed; and nineteen percent were both employed by someone else and were also self-employed. •&#;Of the sixty-one percent employed by someone else (and without any self-employment), approximately eighty-six percent were employed in at least one fulltime job, including about twenty percent who were supplementing their full-time job(s) with part-time work. •&#;Respondents who had nothing but part-time jobs were more likely to be age 65 and over, females, those with less than a high school diploma and those who were widowed or never married. •&#;Most employed respondents received paid vacation, health insurance, an employer-sponsored retirement program and paid sick leave from their employer. •&#;The proportion of self-employed tended to increase with age and decrease with community size. •&#;Rural Nebraskans with the highest incomes had disproportionately large representation among the self-employed category, including those who were self-employed in conjunction with another job. •&#;Just over one-third of the self-employed had a non-agricultural home-based business. •&#;The vast majority of rural Nebraskans do not have any telecommuters in their household. Certain groups that were more likely to have a telecommuter were: respondents with higher household incomes, those between the ages of 40 and 49 and the respondents with higher educational levels. •&#;The telecommunications technologies used more often by rural Nebraskans include: a telephone answering machine, a personal computer, a cellular phone and satellite TV. On the other hand, few respondents reported using interactive TV, electronic medical monitoring and an electronic bulletin board. •&#;Certain groups were more likely to use most of those technologies: those with higher household incomes, those with higher educational levels, respondents living in the larger communities, and those less than 50 years of age

    Quality of Life of Rural Nebraskans: Results from the 1997 Annual Nebraska Rural Poll

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    This working paper presents findings from the second annual Nebraska Rural Poll. The study is based on 3,264 responses from households in the 87 nonmetropolitan counties in the state. The objectives of this paper are to answer the following questions: 1. Has the well-being of rural Nebraskans changed from what they reported in the first annual Rural Poll? 2. All things considered, do rural Nebraskans believe they are better off today than five years ago, and do they believe they are better off than their parents were at their age? 3. Do rural Nebraskans believe they will be better or worse off ten years in the future? 4. Do rural Nebraskans believe that “people are powerless to control their own lives”? 5. How important are certain factors in determining rural Nebraskans’ well-being and how satisfied are they with those same factors? Key findings include the following: •&#;Over sixty percent of rural Nebraskans believe they are better off than their parents were at their age. •&#;Sixty percent of the respondents believed they were either better off or about the same as they were five years ago, and seventy-five percent believed they would be either better off or about the same ten years from now. •&#;Rural Nebraskans tended to have a somewhat more positive outlook in 1997 than in 1996. More of the 1997 respondents said they were better off than they were five years ago and more of them expect to be better off ten years from now than last year’s respondents. •&#;Certain sub-groups of respondents were less likely than others to be positive about their present and/or future well-being. These sub-groups include those living in smaller towns, those living in the Panhandle Region, respondents with lower incomes and lower educational levels, female respondents and those who are widowed. •&#;Slightly less than forty percent of rural Nebraskans either “agreed” or “strongly agreed” with the statement that “…people are powerless to control their own lives.” However, the proportion of the respondents holding this belief did increase somewhat between 1996 and 1997. •&#;Again, certain sub-groups of the respondents were more likely than others to believe that “…people are powerless.” These subgroups include those with lower income and educational levels and those age 65 and over. •&#;Rural Nebraskans rank their family, the health of their family, and their own health as the most important factors affecting their overall well-being. •&#;Several other factors, including financial security during retirement and current income levels, were also quite important in affecting overall well-being. At the same time, a significant proportion of the respondents were not very satisfied with either their current income levels or financial security during retirement

    The DUNE Far Detector Vertical Drift Technology, Technical Design Report

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    International audienceDUNE is an international experiment dedicated to addressing some of the questions at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics, including the mystifying preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe. The dual-site experiment will employ an intense neutrino beam focused on a near and a far detector as it aims to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to make high-precision measurements of the PMNS matrix parameters, including the CP-violating phase. It will also stand ready to observe supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector implements liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) technology, and combines the many tens-of-kiloton fiducial mass necessary for rare event searches with the sub-centimeter spatial resolution required to image those events with high precision. The addition of a photon detection system enhances physics capabilities for all DUNE physics drivers and opens prospects for further physics explorations. Given its size, the far detector will be implemented as a set of modules, with LArTPC designs that differ from one another as newer technologies arise. In the vertical drift LArTPC design, a horizontal cathode bisects the detector, creating two stacked drift volumes in which ionization charges drift towards anodes at either the top or bottom. The anodes are composed of perforated PCB layers with conductive strips, enabling reconstruction in 3D. Light-trap-style photon detection modules are placed both on the cryostat's side walls and on the central cathode where they are optically powered. This Technical Design Report describes in detail the technical implementations of each subsystem of this LArTPC that, together with the other far detector modules and the near detector, will enable DUNE to achieve its physics goals
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