16 research outputs found

    Does Managerial Training have any impact on the performance of MSE Managers? Empirical evidence from Ghana

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    Received the best full paper award in the performance management trackAdopting the human capital theory as a lens, this study investigates the impact of managerial training on the performance of the managers of Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs) in Ghana. The study uses primary data collected from 506 MSEs who are clients of Financial Non- Governmental Organisations (FNGOs) in the Volta Region of Ghana. Managerial Training (MT) and Performance has been measured on a five-point Likert scale anchored by strongly disagree (1) and strongly agree (5). MT has been measured using 4 main constructs namely, training content, training efficiency, training frequency and training accessibility whilst performance was measured using 12 items. The study controlled for business age, industry category, manager’s educational level and gender. The study shows that managerial training content, efficiency, frequency, and accessibility are statistically significant in explaining performance among MSE managers in Ghana. Secondly, the study also shows that industry category, managers educational level, and business age influences the performance of managers. However, gender is statistically insignificant and does not have any impact on the performance of MSE managers in Ghana. The study, therefore, argues for the delivery of managerial training which is content-rich, efficient, frequent and accessible to MSE managers to develop their managerial capabilities (Fatoki, 2011; Newman et al., 2014)

    The nexus between technology absorption and firm growth in Africa: A resource-based perspective

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    By drawing upon the Resource-Based View (RBV) theory, this study investigates the effects of human capital, credit, and electricity on technology absorption among firms in Africa. The technological absorption index for 40 African countries was used to measure technological diffusion and the capacity to absorb new technology among African firms. Secondly, the World Bank’s data on access to credit and electricity for 40 African countries was also employed as explanatory variables. The findings indicate that to support technological absorption and diffusion among African firms, a broad access to credit, electricity and effective human capital development is imperative. Access to credit, electricity and human capital were significant in explaining variances in technological absorption. More so, whiles education quality is significant, African governance structures are insignificant in driving technological absorption

    A review of micro‚Äźpractices in commodity value chains in the global south

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    Micro-practices in the commodity value chains (CVCs) have experienced dramatic evolution through digital technology (DT). This article reviews the literature to identify four critical periods in this evolutionary cycle, from 1980 to 2020, to explicate the dimensions through which DT has foregrounded the burgeoning patterns of change in practice. Focusing on three key levels of micro-practices: farm level, production level, and institutional level, a nuanced analysis of the role of relevant stakeholders in mobilizing resources and provides support to leverage DT. Our study shows how stakeholders' receptiveness has facilitated the radical (re)construction of micro-practices in CVC. Implications for theory and practice are outlined

    The three pointers of research and development (R&D) for growth-boosting sustainable innovation system

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    Research and development (R&D) is frequently touted and labelled as the fundamental engine for creating sustainable innovations and achieving climate transitions. Yet, recent R&D efforts have struggled to live up to the widespread life-altering results they delivered in the 1960s when the term R&D was coined. In our attempt to address this concern, we propose a sustainability pathway model to achieving an economically viable innovation system that is anchored in three important pointers of R&D which have long been viewed as mutually distinct components in R&D budgets‚ÄĒinvestment, talent, and learning institutions. Directing attention to the pervasive need to align R&D investments with talents and learning institutions, we delineate how these pointers of R&D coming together to constitute a trivalent force may drive a growth-boosting sustainable innovation system. While there is no simple recipe which suggests an optimal combination of new scientific understanding, technologies, and process that could help produce the much-needed innovations and technological change, we present a set of propositions that highlights opportunities for reflection on existing R&D investment strategies and serves as a bridge to connect the emergent scholarship on sustainability with the intellectual traditions of R&D in innovation management

    Ethnic business failure: a scarcity mind-set perspective

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    We integrate insights from the psychological concept of ‚Äėscarcity mindset‚Äô and mixed embeddedness to theorise ethnic venture failure. We explore the sentiments and choices of UK-based ethnic entrepreneurs to theorise the ‚Äėcause-of-death' of their unsuccessful ventures. The scarcity mind-set lens we develop suggests the constraints of ‚Äėhaving too little‚Äô can induce four organising tensions ‚Äď spatial spawning, ethnic embeddedness, dispositional optimism, and service nepotism ‚Äď which operate in combination or serially to precipitate ethnic venture failure. We contribute to research on conflicting demands in entrepreneurship by finding that a paucity of resources stymies the conversion of contradictory yet mutually constituting demands into productive outcomes. In this way, we illuminate contextualised entrepreneurial organising demands that require reconciliation to capture value. In advocating the purposeful pursuit of paradoxes as a means of addressing failure, our study analyses stories of unsuccessful ventures in ways that explicitly acknowledge enduring inequalities within markets and society at-larg

    A phoenix rising? The regeneration of the Ghana garment and textile industry

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    Some African countries‚Äô premier industries, such as textiles, garments and agro-processing, which floundered in the face of market liberalization and stiff competition from cheap imports, are now going through regenerative changes, with some beginning to tell a cautionary tale of a leap upwards. Focusing on the Ghana garment and textile industry, we draw on a framework that integrates social practices and everyday general-purpose technologies to explore the rise, decline and regeneration of the industry. Explicating a fine analysis of how the performative reconfiguration of social practices and functional sources of innovation and technologies may combine to support innovation-driven growth, our study sheds light on how loosely connected actors within a hitherto floundering industry can learn to transform their situated practices to drive their ‚Äėindustrial regeneration‚Äô. Implications for the theory and practice of industrial regeneration are outlined

    In direct breach of managerial edicts: A practice approach to creative deviance in professional service firms

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    Drawing on practice as a meta-theoretical lens, we explore creative deviance (CD): wilful violation of managerial orders by employee(s) to pursue creative ideas. Data for our inquiry comes from in-depth interviews with middle managers and employees in two professional service firms (PSFs). We argue that two distinct organising processes are necessary for the emergence of CD in practice: organising configuration and formalisation of R&D processes. We develop these dimensions to produce a typology of interrelated ideal types of outcomes when employees are explicitly instructed to stop pursuing an idea. We found three salient organising practices (technical concerns for efficiency and metrics, suppression of metistic knowledge and disjointed managerial responses to violations of sanctioned organising procedures), which may operate in combination or serially, to foster CD in practice. We conclude with some key implications for the theory and practice of creativity in PSFs. © 2018 RADMA and John Wiley & Sons Ltd
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