3 research outputs found

    Total Quality Management as a Philosophy to Improve the Performance of the Academic Organization

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    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the role of total quality management as a philosophy for improvement in the academic organization, as it represents a necessary trend in developing the activities of many organizations in the light of globalization and the challenges that these organizations face, in order to bring about fundamental developments, and the use of that philosophy as an effective means towards customer satisfaction and meeting his requirements.   Theoretical framework: Total quality management is regarded as one of the contemporary concepts that concentrates on a set of administrative principles; if it has been applied in organization, it will succeed in achieving quality.   Design/Methodology/Approach: To achieve the objectives of the study, a questionnaire of 60-item has been used. The sample comprised 65 academic staff members from various parts of the organization. According to the purpose of the study, two main hypotheses were formulated. A set of statistical method  of spss vr.24.  has been used.     Findings: It is concluded that supporting and adopting the total quality will be fruitful as a successful business philosophy for the continuity by creating appropriate requirements and conditions.   Research/Practical/Social Implications: Establishing the desire towards change by following the best by individuals and adopting stimulus programs that reinforce their ability to realize cognitive new ness.   Originality/Value:  The value of the study is that the organization's interest in the social aspect and its adoption confirms the organization's adaptation to the requirements of society

    Global variation in postoperative mortality and complications after cancer surgery: a multicentre, prospective cohort study in 82 countries

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    ¬© 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 licenseBackground: 80% of individuals with cancer will require a surgical procedure, yet little comparative data exist on early outcomes in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). We compared postoperative outcomes in breast, colorectal, and gastric cancer surgery in hospitals worldwide, focusing on the effect of disease stage and complications on postoperative mortality. Methods: This was a multicentre, international prospective cohort study of consecutive adult patients undergoing surgery for primary breast, colorectal, or gastric cancer requiring a skin incision done under general or neuraxial anaesthesia. The primary outcome was death or major complication within 30 days of surgery. Multilevel logistic regression determined relationships within three-level nested models of patients within hospitals and countries. Hospital-level infrastructure effects were explored with three-way mediation analyses. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03471494. Findings: Between April 1, 2018, and Jan 31, 2019, we enrolled 15 958 patients from 428 hospitals in 82 countries (high income 9106 patients, 31 countries; upper-middle income 2721 patients, 23 countries; or lower-middle income 4131 patients, 28 countries). Patients in LMICs presented with more advanced disease compared with patients in high-income countries. 30-day mortality was higher for gastric cancer in low-income or lower-middle-income countries (adjusted odds ratio 3¬∑72, 95% CI 1¬∑70‚Äď8¬∑16) and for colorectal cancer in low-income or lower-middle-income countries (4¬∑59, 2¬∑39‚Äď8¬∑80) and upper-middle-income countries (2¬∑06, 1¬∑11‚Äď3¬∑83). No difference in 30-day mortality was seen in breast cancer. The proportion of patients who died after a major complication was greatest in low-income or lower-middle-income countries (6¬∑15, 3¬∑26‚Äď11¬∑59) and upper-middle-income countries (3¬∑89, 2¬∑08‚Äď7¬∑29). Postoperative death after complications was partly explained by patient factors (60%) and partly by hospital or country (40%). The absence of consistently available postoperative care facilities was associated with seven to 10 more deaths per 100 major complications in LMICs. Cancer stage alone explained little of the early variation in mortality or postoperative complications. Interpretation: Higher levels of mortality after cancer surgery in LMICs was not fully explained by later presentation of disease. The capacity to rescue patients from surgical complications is a tangible opportunity for meaningful intervention. Early death after cancer surgery might be reduced by policies focusing on strengthening perioperative care systems to detect and intervene in common complications. Funding: National Institute for Health Research Global Health Research Unit

    Effects of hospital facilities on patient outcomes after cancer surgery: an international, prospective, observational study