NASA Technical Reports Server

    Auto-Coding UML Statecharts for Flight Software

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    Statecharts have been used as a means to communicate behaviors in a precise manner between system engineers and software engineers. Hand-translating a statechart to code, as done on some previous space missions, introduces the possibility of errors in the transformation from chart to code. To improve auto-coding, we have developed a process that generates flight code from UML statecharts. Our process is being used for the flight software on the Space Interferometer Mission (SIM)

    324GHz CMOS VCO Using Linear Superimposition Technique

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    Terahertz (frequencies ranged from 300GHz to 3THz) imaging and spectroscopic systems have drawn increasing attention recently due to their unique capabilities in detecting and possibly analyzing concealed objects. The generation of terahertz signals is nonetheless nontrivial and traditionally accomplished by using either free-electron radiation, optical lasers, Gunn diodes or fundamental oscillation by using III-V based HBT/HEMT technology[1-3]... We have substantially extended the operation range of deep-scaled CMOS by using a linear superimposition method, in which we have realized a 324GHz VCO in 90nm digital CMOS with 4GHz tuning range under 1V supply voltage. This may also pave the way for ultra-high data rate wireless communications beyond that of IEEE 802.15.3c and reach data rates comparable to that of fiber optical communications, such as OC768 (40Gbps) and beyond

    Estimation of Cyclic Error Due to Scattering in the Internal OPD Metrology of the Space Interferometry Mission

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    A common-path laser heterodyne interferometer capable of measuring the internal optical path difference (OPD) with accuracy of the order of 10 pm was demonstrated at JPL. To achieve this accuracy, the relative power received by the detector that is contributed by the scattering of light at the optical surfaces should be less than -97 dB. A method has been developed to estimate the cyclic error caused by the scattering of the optical surfaces. The result of the analysis is presented

    A Range Compensating Feed Motion Concept for Spaceborne Radar

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    Tropical cyclones can cause major loss of both life and property, so that improvements in forecasting motion, intensity, and rainfall are needed. Such forecasting requires accurate measurements of the current state of the cyclone. Ground-based Doppler radars have long been used as an effective means of monitoring severe precipitating storms. Because of the oceanic nature of tropical cyclones, remote monitoring from space is desirable. Recently, the Precipitation Radar (PR) [1] aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) [2] satellite has demonstrated an unprecedented capacity for 3-D imaging of precipitating storms. Nonetheless, due to the relatively long TRMM return cycle (less than once per day) the value of PR data has primarily been limited to the understanding of climatological properties of tropical cyclones [3]. The return cycle can be substantially reduced by sensing from a geostationary platform

    A Modified LC/MS/MS Method with Enhanced Sensitivity for the Determination of Scopolamine in Human Plasma

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    Intranasal scopolamine is a choice drug for the treatment of motion sickness during space flight because of its quick onset of action, short half-life and favorable sideeffects profile. The dose administered usually ranges between 0.1 and 0.4 mg. Such small doses make it difficult to detect concentrations of scopolamine in biological fluids using existing sensitive LC/MS/MS method, especially when the biological sample volumes are limited. To measure scopolamine in human plasma to facilitate pharmacokinetic evaluation of the drug, we developed a sensitive LC/MS/MS method using 96 well micro elution plates for solid phase extraction (SPE) of scopolamine in human plasma. Human plasma (100-250 micro L) were loaded onto Waters Oasis HLB 96 well micro elution plate and eluted with 50 L of organic solvent without evaporation and reconstitution. HPLC separation of the eluted sample was performed using an Agilent Zorbax SB-CN column (50 x 2.1 mm) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min for 3 minutes. The mobile phase for separation was 80:20 (v/v) methanol: ammonium acetate (30 mM) in water. Concentrations of scopolamine were determined using a Micromass Quattro Micro(TM) mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization (ESI). ESI mass spectra were acquired in positive ion mode with multiple reaction monitoring for the determination of scopolamine m/z = 304.2 right arrow 138.1 and internal standard hyoscyamine m/z = 290.2 right arrow 124.1. The method is rapid, reproducible, specific and has the following parameters: scopolamine and the IS are eluted at about 1.1 and 1.7 min respectively. The linear range is 25-10000 pg/mL for scopolamine in human plasma with correlation coefficients greater than 0.99 and CV less than 0.5%. The intra-day and inter-day CVs are less than 15% for quality control samples with concentrations of 75,300, and 750 pg/mL of scopolamine in human plasma. SPE using 96 well micro elution plates allows rapid sample preparation and enhanced sensitivity for the LC/MS/MS determination of scopolamine in a small volume of biological samples. The new method is also cost effective since it uses a small volume of organic solvents compared to the methods using SPE cartridges or regular 96 well SPE plates. This method can be successfully used for bioavailability and pharmacokinetic evaluations of scopolamine, especially when volumes of biological samples are limited. Further investigation to use automated SPE system with 96 well micro elution plates is planned

    CERES Monthly Gridded Single Satellite TOA and Surfaces/Clouds (SFC) data in HDF (CER_SFC_Terra-FM2-MODIS_Edition2A)

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    The Monthly Gridded TOA/Surface Fluxes and Clouds (SFC) product contains a month of space and time averaged Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data for a single scanner instrument. The SFC is also produced for combinations of scanner instruments. All instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and window fluxes at the Top-of-the-Atmosphere (TOA) and surface from the CERES SSF product for a month are sorted by 1-degree spatial regions and by the local hour of observation. The mean of the instantaneous fluxes for a given region-hour bin is determined and recorded on the SFC along with other flux statistics and scene information. These average fluxes are given for both clear-sky and total-sky scenes. The regional cloud properties are column averaged and are included on the SFC. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1998-01-01; Stop_Date=2003-12-31] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=100] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1 degree; Longitude_Resolution=1 degree; Horizontal_Resolution_Range=100 km - < 250 km or approximately 1 degree - < 2.5 degrees; Temporal_Resolution=1 hour; Temporal_Resolution_Range=Hourly - < Daily]

    CERES Single Scanner Satellite Footprint, TOA, Surface Fluxes and Clouds (SSF) data in HDF (CER_SSF_Aqua-FM3-MODIS_Edition1B)

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    The Single Scanner Footprint TOA/Surface Fluxes and Clouds (SSF) product contains one hour of instantaneous Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data for a single scanner instrument. The SSF combines instantaneous CERES data with scene information from a higher-resolution imager such as Visible/Infrared Scanner (VIRS) on TRMM or Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua. Scene identification and cloud properties are defined at the higher imager resolution and these data are averaged over the larger CERES footprint. For each CERES footprint, the SSF contains the number of cloud layers and for each layer the cloud amount, height, temperature, pressure, optical depth, emissivity, ice and liquid water path, and water particle size. The SSF also contains the CERES filtered radiances for the total, shortwave (SW), and window (WN) channels and the unfiltered SW, longwave (LW), and WN radiances. The SW, LW, and WN radiances at spacecraft altitude are converted to Top-of-the-Atmosphere (TOA) fluxes based on the imager defined scene. These TOA fluxes are used to estimate surface fluxes. Only footprints with adequate imager coverage are included on CER_SSF_TRMM-PFM-VIRS_Subset_Edition1the SSF which is much less than the full set of footprints on the CERES ES-8 product. The following CERES SSF data sets are currently available: CER_SSF_TRMM-PFM-VIRS_Edition1 CER_SSF_TRMM-PFM-VIRS_Subset_Edition1 CER_SSF_TRMM-PFM-VIRS_Edition2A CER_SSF_TRMM-SIM-VIRS_Edition2_VIRSonly CER_SSF_TRMM-PFM-VIRS_Edition2A-TransOps CER_SSF_TRMM-PFM-VIRS_Edition2B-TransOps CER_SSF_TRMM-PFM-VIRS_Edition2B CER_SSF_Terra-FM1-MODIS_Edition1A CER_SSF_Terra-FM1-MODIS_Edition1A CER_SSF_Terra-FM1-MODIS_Edition2A CER_SSF_Terra-FM2-MODIS_Edition2A CER_SSF_Terra-FM1-MODIS_Edition2B CER_SSF_Terra-FM2-MODIS_Edition2B CER_SSF_Aqua-FM4-MODIS_Beta1 CER_SSF_Aqua-FM3-MODIS_Beta2 CER_SSF_Aqua-FM4-MODIS_Beta2. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1998-01-01; Stop_Date=2005-03-31] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Temporal_Resolution=1 hour; Temporal_Resolution_Range=Hourly - < Daily]

    MISR Level 2 Surface parameters (MIL2ASLS_V1)

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    The Land Surface data include bihemispherical and directional-hemispherical reflectances (albedo), hemispherical directional and bidirectional reflectance factors (BRF), BRF model parameters, leaf-area index (LAI), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) on a 1.1 km grid. The land surface data include hemispherical directional reflectance factor, bihemispherical reflectance (i.e., albedo), bidirectional reflectance factor, directional hemispherical reflectance, BRF model parameters, FPAR, and terrain-referenced view and illumination angles. [Location=GLOBAL LAND] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1.1 km - 17.6 km; Longitude_Resolution=1.1 km - 17.6 km; Horizontal_Resolution_Range=1 km - < 10 km or approximately .01 degree - < .09 degree; Temporal_Resolution=about 15 orbits/day]

    MISR Level 1B1 Local Mode Radiance Data (MIB1LM_V2)

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    The results of two types of processing are included in this product. First, the Radiance Scaling operation converts the camera's digital number output to a measure of energy incident on the front optical surface. The measurement is expressed in units called radiance (energy per unit area, wavelength, and solid angle) as defined by the International Standard (SI). Second, Radiance Conditioning modifies the radiances to remove instrument-dependent effects. Specifically, image sharpening is applied, and focal-plane scattering is removed. Additionally, all radiances are adjusted to remove slight spectral sensitivity differences among the 1504 detector elements of each spectral band and each camera. In addition to the Level 1B1 radiometric product for MISR's Global Mode imagery, there is a separate Level 1B1 product for each high-resolution Local Mode scene. The Radiometric Product contains spectral radiances for all MISR channels (four spectral bands and nine cameras). Each radiance value represents the incident radiance averaged over the sensor's total band response. Processing includes both radiance scaling and conditioning steps. Radiance scaling converts the Level 1A data from digital counts to radiances using coefficients derived in combination with the On-Board Calibrator (OBC) and vicarious calibrations. The OBC contains Spectralon calibration panels which are deployed monthly and reflect sunlight into the cameras. The OBC detector standards then measure this reflected light to provide the calibration. Vicarious field campaigns are conducted less frequently but provide an independent methodology useful for reducing systematic errors. Radiance conditioning removes undesirable instrument effects. Image enhancement is provided by deconvolving the scene with the sensor's point-spread-function. Additionally, in-band scaling adjusts the reported radiances to correspond to a nominal band response profile. This frees the Level 2 software from the need to correct for detector element non-uniformities. No out-of-band correction is done for this product, nor are the data geometrically corrected or resampled at this point. In summary, the Level 1B1 Product contains the Data Numbers (DNs) radiometrically-scaled to radiances with no geometric resampling. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=275 m for red band only; Longitude_Resolution=275 m for red band only; Temporal_Resolution=about 15 orbits/day]

    Protograph LDPC Codes for the Erasure Channel

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    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of protograph Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes for erasure channels. A protograph is a Tanner graph with a relatively small number of nodes. A "copy-and-permute" operation can be applied to the protograph to obtain larger derived graphs of various sizes. For very high code rates and short block sizes, a low asymptotic threshold criterion is not the best approach to designing LDPC codes. Simple protographs with much regularity and low maximum node degrees appear to be the best choices Quantized-rateless protograph LDPC codes can be built by careful design of the protograph such that multiple puncturing patterns will still permit message passing decoding to procee
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