1,398 research outputs found

    Two Boats, Three Summers, Five Universities, One Dozen Instructors, and Sixty-Five Teachers: A Collaborative Oceanography Field Program for Earth Science

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    A three-day ïŹeld workshop was an integral component of the graduate-level course entitled, Oceanography, that was offered by Virginia Earth Science Collaborative Project (VESC) to help Virginia educators earn the earth science teaching endorsement. The VESC partner institutions that offered Oceanographngeorge Mason University, James Madison University, the University of Virginia Southwest Center, and Virginia Commonwealth University-lacked direct access to research and education facilities en the coast. The College of William & Mary, another VESC partner, provided this resource through the Virginia Institute of Marine Science’s (VIMS) Eastern Shore Laboratory in Wachapreague, Virginia. The field program agenda and activities were developed and conducted by a team comprised of VESC oceanography faculty, Virginia Sea Grant educators, and a scientist from VIMS. This collaboration resulted in a program design used as the basis for six workshops conducted over three summers. Seventy-nine Virginia middle school and high school science teachers took part in the six workshops, conducted in July of 2005, 2006, and 2007. This article describes the workshop activities and provides perspectives on its design and implementation from the viewpoints of Virginia Sea Grant educators who served as field instructors

    Domain Specific Language for Magnetic Measurements at CERN

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    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is one of the world’s largest and most respected centres for scientific research. Founded in 1954, the CERN Laboratory sits astride the Franco–Swiss border near Geneva. It was one of Europe’s first joint ventures and now has 20 Member States. Its main purpose is fundamental research in partcle physics, namely investigating what the Universe is made of and how it works. At CERN, the design and realization of the new particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), has required a remarkable technological effort in many areas of engineering. In particular, the tests of LHC superconducting magnets disclosed new horizons to magnetic measurements. At CERN, the objectively large R&D effort of the Technolgy Department/Magnets, Superconductors and Cryostats (TE/MSC) group identified areas where further work is required in order to assist the LHC commissioning and start-up, to provide continuity in the instrumentation for the LHC magnets maintenance, and to achieve more accurate magnet models for the LHC exploitation. In view of future projects, a wide range of software requirements has been recently satisfied by the Flexible Framework for Magnetic Measurements (FFMM), designed also for integrating more performing flexible hardware. FFMM software applications control several devices, such as encoder boards, digital integrators, motor controllers, transducers. In addition, they synchronize and coordinate different measurement tasks and actions

    Floor response spectra in RC frame structures designed according to Eurocode 8

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    © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht Nonstructural components (NSCs) should be subjected to a careful and rational seismic design, in order to reduce the economic loss and to avoid threats to the life safety, as well as what concerns structural elements. The design of NSCs is based on the evaluation of the maximum inertia force, which is related to the floor spectral accelerations. The question arises as to whether Eurocode 8 is able to predict actual floor response spectral accelerations occurring in structures designed according to Eurocode 8. A parametric study is conducted on five RC frame structures in order to evaluate the floor response spectra. The structures, designed according to Eurocode 8, are subjected to a set of earthquakes, compatible with the design response spectrum. Time-history analyses are performed both on elastic and inelastic models of the considered structures. Eurocode formulation for the evaluation of the seismic demand on NSCs does not well fit the numerical results. Some comments on the target spectrum provided by AC 156 for the seismic qualification of NSC are also included

    A haptic-enabled multimodal interface for the planning of hip arthroplasty

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    Multimodal environments help fuse a diverse range of sensory modalities, which is particularly important when integrating the complex data involved in surgical preoperative planning. The authors apply a multimodal interface for preoperative planning of hip arthroplasty with a user interface that integrates immersive stereo displays and haptic modalities. This article overviews this multimodal application framework and discusses the benefits of incorporating the haptic modality in this area

    Dynamic Analysis of Mooring Cables with Application to Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

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    Floating offshore wind turbines are recently being considered widely for adoption in the wind power industry, attracting interest of several researchers and calling for the development of appropriate computational models and techniques. In the present work, a nonlinear finite-element formulation is proposed and applied to the static and dynamic analysis of mooring cables. Numerical examples are presented, and in particular, a mooring cable typically used for floating offshore wind turbines is analyzed. Hydrodynamic effects on the cable are accounted for using the Morison approach. A key enabling development here is an algorithmic tangent stiffness operator including hydrodynamic coupling. Numerical results also suggest that previous empirical hydrodynamic coefficients could be obtained by fully coupled fluid–structure interaction. Convergence-rate and energy-balance calculations have been used to demonstrate the accuracy of computed solutions. The introduction of the developed cable model in a framework for the study of the global behavior of floating offshore wind turbines is the subject of the current work. Source code developed for this work is available as online supplemental material with the paper

    Common features between neoplastic and preneoplastic lesions of the biliary tract and the pancreas

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    The bile duct system and pancreas show many similarities due to their anatomical proximity and common embryological origin. Consequently, preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions of the bile duct and pancreas share analogies in terms of molecular, histological and pathophysiological features. Intraepithelial neoplasms are reported in biliary tract, as biliary intraepithelial neoplasm (BilIN), and in pancreas, as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN). Both can evolve to invasive carcinomas, respectively cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Intraductal papillary neoplasms arise in biliary tract and pancreas. Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the biliary tract (IPNB) share common histologic and phenotypic features such as pancreatobiliary, gastric, intestinal and oncocytic types, and biological behavior with the pancreatic counterpart, the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas (IPMN). All these neoplastic lesions exhibit similar immunohistochemical phenotypes, suggesting a common carcinogenic process. Indeed, CCA and PDAC display similar clinic-pathological features as growth pattern, poor response to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy and, as a consequence, an unfavorable prognosis. The objective of this review is to discuss similarities and differences between the neoplastic lesions of the pancreas and biliary tract with potential implications on a common origin from similar stem/progenitor cells

    Impact of Covid - 19 Pandemic on Orthopaedics at Northwell Health, New York.

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    The Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemicplaced an immense strain on healthcare systems and orthopedic surgeons across the world. To limit the spread, federal and state governments mandated the cancellation of all non-urgent surgical cases to address surging hospital admissions and manage workforce and resource reallocation. During the pandemic surge, thousands of surgical cancellations have been required. We outline our experience through the onset and advance of the surge, detail our incident response, and discuss the transition toward recovery

    A Procedure for Performing Nonlinear Pushover Analysis for Tsunami Loading to ASCE 7

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    The new ASCE 7-16 Chapter 6 offers a comprehensive and practical methodology for the design of structures for tsunami loads and effects. While it provides prescriptive tsunami loading and design requirements, Chapter 6 also allows for the use of performance-based nonlinear analysis tools. However, the specifics of load application protocol and system and component evaluation for such a nonlinear approach are not provided. This paper presents a procedure for performing nonlinear static pushover analysis for tsunami loading within the framework of the ASCE 7-16 standard. Through this approach, the user can both estimate the effective systemic lateral load-resisting capacity of a building and the local component demand. This enables the identification of deficiencies in structural elements with respect to the ASCE 7-16 standard acceptance criteria. To demonstrate the procedure, a prototypical reinforced concrete multistory building exposed to high tsunami hazard on the US Northwest Pacific Coast is assessed. This is a building with sufficient height to provide last-resort refuge for people having insufficient time to evacuate outside the inundation zone. The results of the nonlinear static pushover analyses show that the structural system has sufficient lateral strength to resist ASCE 7-16 prescribed tsunami loads, but fails the checks for component-based loading, with the exterior ground-story columns observed to fail in flexure and shear. The example demonstrates that use of the tsunami nonlinear static analysis procedure allows the identification of structural deficiencies such that a targeted strengthening of the building can be conducted (i.e., flexural and shear strengthening of the seaward and inland columns for the case study building presented), leading to significantly reduced costs

    THE BRIDGE WEB SITE GROWING AND SUSTAINING PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN OCEAN SCIENCE AND EDUCATION

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    When physicist Tim Berners-Lee and a team of fellow scientists at the European Center for High Energy Physics (CERN) launched the first-ever Web site in 1989, their goal was to make it easier for scientists to access research documents and scientific data (CERN, 2008). In 1998, Virginia Sea Grant educators at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) had a similar goal: to make ocean science educational resources and current research data more accessible to classroom teachers. The Virginia Sea Grant education team took the first step toward accomplishing this goal by launching a Web site of its own, called "Bridge." The name was inspired by the idea of a ship's bridge with a teacher at the helm, navigating "an ocean of marine education data." It also represents a bridge spanning the divide between the education and the ocean research communities, which is the essence of the Bridge project's mission

    A nonlinear static procedure for the tsunami design of a reinforced concrete building to the ASCE7 Standard

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    New ASCE 7-16 Chapter 6 offer a comprehensive and practical methodology for the design of structures for tsunami loads and effects. While they provide prescriptive tsunami loading and design requirements, they also allow for the use of performance-based analysis tools. However, no guidance is provided as to how the performance-based analysis should be performed. This paper presents an improved nonlinear static pushover procedure for the assessment of the nonlinear capacity of structures to tsunami, within the framework of the ASCE 7-16 provisions. For this purpose, a prototypical reinforced concrete multi-storey building exposed to high tsunami hazard in the US Northwest Pacific coast is assessed. This is a building with sufficient height to provide last-resort refuge for people having insufficient time to evacuate outside the inundation zone. Two different tsunami load discretisation methods are applied to investigate the structural capacity under tsunami systemic and component loading, respectively. The results of the nonlinear static pushover analyses show that the structural system has sufficient lateral strength to resist ASCE 7-16 prescribed tsunami loads. However, when component-based loading is considered, the seaward ground storey columns are observed to fail in shear, precipitating structural failure. This is in agreement with the ASCE 7-16 simplified systemic acceptance criteria, i.e. that the structure is unsafe for use as a refuge, and that it would require significant strengthening. However, the use of the VDPO provides information of what needs to be strengthened in order to improve the tsunami performance of the structure
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