1,791,846 research outputs found

    PENERAPAN NILAI DAN ETIKA DALAM INTERVENSI: Dilema Etis Pekerja Sosial Dalam Program Pemberdayaan Kelompok Pemulung Mardiko Piyungan Bantul

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    Social workers have an obligation to apply values and ethics as a form of professionalism in the intervention process. However, in reality the application of values and ethics sometimes experiences ethical problems or dilemmas. The focus of research on the application of social worker values and ethics in the mentoring process to clients, especially in the community empowerment program for the Mardiko scavenger group at TPST Piyungan Bantul, Yogyakarta. As well, looking at the ethical dilemmas experienced by social workers while applying values and ethics. This research uses a qualitative-descriptive method of research and data collection techniques are carried out by interview methods, observation and documentation. The results of this study state that the application of values and ethics in the Mardiko scavenger empowerment program at TPST Piyungan includes acceptance, individualization, expression of taste, non-judgmental attitude, objectivity, self-determination and confidentiality. This study also explains that social workers in the practice of community empowerment mentoring experience ethical dilemmas such as when giving scavengers the freedom to determine their own destiny, but on the other hand this freedom has an inaccurate effect on scavengers in making choices. Another ethical dilemma that occurs relates to professional and personal values. but on the other hand, sthis freedom gives an inaccurate effect on scavengers in making choices. Another ethical dilemma that occurs relates to professional and personal values. but on the other hand, this freedom gives an inaccurate effect on scavengers in making choices. Another ethical dilemma that occurs relates to professional and personal values. Keywords: ethical dilemma, Social Workers, Seavenger

    Corporate Welfare

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    A CCH policy brief investigating corporate welfare at the state and federal levels. Finds that taxpayer dollars supporting corporations that do not contribute to the public welfare might be better spent in addressing our nation's critical social issues such as homelessness, healthcare, job training and creation, education, and housing

    Welfare Rights

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    Making the Link: Pregnancy Prevention and the New Welfare Era

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    Making the Link: Pregnancy Prevention in the New Welfare Era offers strategies to prevent unintended pregnancy in an era in which the nation's welfare program has a changed mission, more money, and greater reach. The enactment of the 1996 welfare law allows federal welfare funds to be spent on an array of pregnancy prevention activities and family planning services; furthermore, welfare funds are no longer limited to welfare recipients who receive grants -- funds may be spent on individuals who have never been a part of the welfare system. These fundamental policy changes, along with nearly $8 billion of unspent welfare funds, allow states to consider whether and how to invest in a range of strategies to prevent unintended pregnancy. The law permits, but does not require, any such investment. Nevertheless, a number of states are creating new ways to address unintended pregnancy. Some states are linking welfare offices and family planning services -- through co-location, information dissemination, referrals, case management, education, and training. Others are tapping welfare funds to provide education, information, or services to those who might never enter a welfare office. Some programs target adults, others teens; some include a focus on males. Making the Link seeks to provide insight into different types of links and how to make them work

    Good-enough principles for welfare

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    The aim of this article is to widen the grounds of the debate on the relationship between values, social change and welfare reform. In the public debate on welfare reform and the Third Way the significance of the welfare politics and campaigns of civil society in challenging the old welfare order has received little acknowledgement. The article argues that these politics and campaigns have, along with both the New Right and New Labour, attempted to construct a new vision of an ‘active welfare subject’. In the process they have also expanded the moral repertoire for understanding people's engagement with welfare beyond the self-interest/altruism dichotomy. The article uses this new repertoire to propose seven key principles for a reordering of the social relations of welfare

    Does organic farming face distinctive livestock welfare issues? - A conceptual analysis

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    The recent development and growth of organic livestock farming and the related development of national and international regulations has fuelled discussions among scientists and philosophers concerning the proper conceptualisation of animal welfare. These discussions on livestock welfare in organic farming draw on the conventional discussions and disputes on animal welfare, which involve issues such as different definitions of welfare (clinical health, absence of suffering, sum of positive and negative experiences, etc.), the possibility for objective measures of animal welfare and the acceptable level of welfare. It seems clear that livestock welfare is a value-laden concept and that animal welfare science cannot be made independent of questions of values and ethics. The question investigated here is whether those values that underpin organic farming, in particular, also affect the interpretation of livestock welfare and, if so, how. While some of the issues raised in connection with organic farming are relatively uncontroversial, others are not. The introduction of organic farming values seems to introduce new criteria for what counts a good animal welfare, as well as a different ethical basis for taking moral decisions on welfare. Organic farming embodies distinctive systemic or communitarian ethical ideas and the organic values are connected to a systemic conception of nature, of agriculture, of the farm and of the animal. The new criteria of welfare are related to concepts such as naturalness, harmony, integrity and care. While the organic values overlap with those involved in the conventional discussion of animal welfare, some of them suggest a need to set new priorities and to re-conceptualise animal welfare – for example, with respect to 'naturalness', in relation to the possibilities for expression of natural behaviour and in relation to animal integrity as a concept for organismic harmony. The organic perspective also seems to suggest a wider range of solutions to welfare problems than changes in farm routines or operations on the animals. The systemic solutions include the choice and reproduction of suitable breeds, changes in the farm structure, and changes in the larger production and consumption system - including consumer perceptions and preferences. But the organic values may also call for sacrifices of individual welfare in a conventional sense in order to advance welfare from the perspective of organic farming. Whether this is good or bad cannot be decided without entering into an inquiry and discussion of the values and ethics involved

    \ud Strategic Social Marketing for Expanding the Commercial Market of Insecticide Treated Nets in Tanzania\ud

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    \ud The Department for International Development (DfID) has been supporting the introduction of ITNs in Tanzania since January 1998. The social marketing of ITNs for malaria prevention in Tanzania was introduced at a national scale in 2000 through the project Social Marketing of Insecticide Treated Nets (SMITN), funded by DfID and the Royal Netherlands Embassy (RNE) and implemented by Population Services International (PSI). This report reflects the SMARTNET project performance since July 2002. The SMARTNET project started in 2002 then was extended in 2004 and continued up to June 30th, 2007. The SMARTNET project was aimed at reduction of infant and under-5 mortality rates. The purpose of the project was to attain the Abuja target of regular usage of insecticide-treated nets (ITN) by 60% of the Tanzanians at high risk of malaria (children under-5 and pregnant women). The project aimed to increase the commercial availability of nets, at affordable prices; establish a nation-wide culture of ITN use; raise the percentage of net treated effectively with insecticide; and establish and maintain a monitoring and evaluation system. Population Services International Tanzania was contracted by DFID and RNE. The project is supervised by the NatNets Steering Committee, under responsibility of the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP), part of the Directorate of Preventive Services of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW). The commercial sector distributes and sells nets through a retail network, which reaches most of the wards in Tanzania. Over the years the sale of nets has increased steadily and will probably reach 3.5 million nets by the end of this year. The TRaC survey (PSI’s monitoring tool) conducted in April 2007 reports that 63% (54%) of pregnant women and 69% (55%) of U5s slept under a net (ITN) the previous night. Through the SMARTNET project insecticide re-treatment kits (NGAO) are promoted and the project has been making the net treatment kits free of charge available to all Tanzanian net manufacturers (TNM), for bundling with new nets. Purchasers of nets treat their new nets at home. While the regular Ngao protects for six months, PSI has introduced a longer lasting net treatment product, called Ngoa ya Muda Mrefu, which sustains under laboratory conditions at least 15 washes. The retreatment kits are sold through a dense network of retailers throughout the country. By the end of 2004 the Tanzania National Voucher Scheme (TNVS) was introduced, which issues vouchers to women during their first antenatal visit to a health clinic. This scheme is funded through subsidies from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria (GFATM). With the voucher women can purchase nets at a strongly reduced price (an average of US $ 1.00) from an accredited retailer of nets. Through this voucher system over 2 million nets have been purchased so far. About 80% of distributed vouchers are redeemed. The TNVS is the necessary complementary activity to reach large groups of the population at risk and to bring the nets within reach of the majority of the poor in the country.\u

    Development of an advisory system that supports good animal welfare in organic production in Norway

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    Organic agriculture wishes to emphasise animal welfare, and aims to be at the forefront with regard to promoting the welfare of farm animals. It is therefore important to increase the expertise in the field of animal welfare in organic farming systems among veterinarians, advisers and farmers. An advisory service that includes on-farm assessment of animal welfare will contribute to securing a high level of animal welfare in organic production. To meet the need for information and expertise, an advisory and development project ”Good animal welfare in organic dairy farming” started in May 2003 and will last until the end of 2005. The project’s main goal is to develop and establish a permanent advisory service aimed at securing a high level of animal health and welfare in organic dairy farming
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