91,067 research outputs found

    Pond Eutrophication

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    Citation: Burden, M., Guo, Q., Krueger, L., & Young, N. (2018) Pond Eutrophication. Unpublished manuscript, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS.Kirmser Undergraduate Research Award - Group Category, grand prizeDr. Lisa WilkenLandowners Bruce and Theresa Meyer of Palmer, KS, requested a design to address eutrophication issues causing blue-green algae blooms within their pond. The blooms impact recreational activities such as swimming, fishing, and canoeing. Currently, their solution is temporary and requires the use of chemicals to harden the water and remove the algae. The Meyer’s have requested a more permanent and cost-effective solution. After completing the engineering design process, two design options are proposed for reducing the effects of eutrophication: vegetative buffer strips and a floating garden. Vegetative buffer strips are used to filter nutrients and sediment from runoff, which will reduce the growth of the blue-green algae. A floating garden has the potential to provide an in-pond solution to reduce excess nutrients, but requires more maintenance and recurring costs. Well-planned buffer strips have a higher chance of providing a long-term solution compared to the floating garden, which would have to be maintained and reinstalled yearly. The final proposed design uses both designs in tandem to synergistically reduce the effects of eutrophication. Water inflow will be rerouted through the vegetative filter through present vegetation, which will reduce the amount of incoming nonpoint source pollutants that enter the pond. The floating garden will be utilized to reduce excess nutrients that are within the pond

    A Eutrophication Model of the White River Basin Above Beaver Reservoir in Northwest Arkansas

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    With national interest focused on man’s ever increasing degradation of the waters in this nation, it is clearly evident that an accurate assessment of all parameters influencing water quality needs to be made. Moreover, nutrient levels and budgets reflecting eutrophication trends are important parameters in the overall factors effecting water quality in lakes and reservoirs. The ability to predict future eutrophication levels will greatly enhance the retardation of the eutrophication process. Through mathematical simulation of this process, eutrophication can be analyzed and intelligent decisions regarding water quality management can be made

    Eutrophication of Loch Leven

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    Structural dynamic eutrophication models

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    This article discusses problems of modelling the seasonal succession of algal species in lakes and reservoirs, and the adaptive selection of certain groups of algae in response to changes in the inputs and relative concentrations of nutrients and other environmental variables. A new generation of quantitative models is being developed which attempts to translate some important biological properties of species (survival, variation, inheritance, reproductive rates and population growth) into predictions about the survival of the fittest, where ”fitness” is measured or estimated in thermodynamic terms. The concept of ”exergy” and its calculation is explored to examine maximal exergy as a measure of fitness in ecosystems, and its use for calculating changes in species composition by means of structural dynamic models. These models accomodate short-term changes in parameters that affect the adaptive responses (species selection) of algae

    Modelling the behaviour of nutrients in the coastal waters of Scotland

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    The overall goal of this project was to provide Scotland with a strategic ecosystem simulation tool for identifying maritime areas which could be at risk of eutrophication. The tool should provide spatially resolved output, and be capable of discriminating between different types and locations of nutrient inputs, so as to enable scenario analyses of different reduction options. The specific aims of the project were firstly to simulate the annual cycles of nutrients and ecological properties of Scottish waters and advise on areas which might suffer from eutrophication, and secondly, to determine the contribution of Scottish nutrient discharges to eutrophication in the OSPAR maritime area as a whole

    Summary and concluding remarks

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    This chapter summarises the meeting, entitled ”Eutrophication: Research and Application to Water Supply”. The general feeling was that academic research on the process of eutrophication had progressed significantly over the past decade, but there had been little contact with the water managers, i.e. those whose work was at the sharp end of dealing with the associated problems. This chapter summarises the sessions held by experts in the field

    River Nar eutrophication studies. 3. Diatoms

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    Climate Change and Eutrophication: A Short Review

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    Water resources are vital not only for human beings but essentially all ecosystems. Human health is at risk if clean drinking water becomes contaminated. Water is also essential for agriculture, manufacturing, energy production and other diverse uses. Therefore, a changing climate and its potential effects put more pressure on water resources. Climate change may cause increased water demand as a result of rising temperatures and evaporation while decreasing water availability. On the other hand, extreme events as a result of climate change can increase surface runoff and flooding, deteriorating water quality as well. One effect is water eutrophication, which occurs when high concentrations of nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, are present in the water. Nutrients come from different sources including agriculture, wastewater, stormwater, and fossil fuel combustion. Algal blooms can cause many problems, such as deoxygenation and water toxicity, ultimately disrupting normal ecosystem functioning. In this paper, we investigate the potential impacts of climatic factors affecting water eutrophication, how these factors are projected to change in the future, and what their projected potential impacts will be

    Thresholds of terrestrial nutrient loading for the development of eutrophication episodes in a coastal embayment in the Aegean Sea

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    Thresholds of terrestrial nutrient loading (inorganic N and P) for the development of eutrophication episodes were estimated in an enclosed embayment, the gulf of Kalloni, in the Aegean, Eastern Mediterranean. Terrestrial loading was quantified by a watershed runoff model taking into account land use, geomorphology, sewerage, industrial and animal farming by-products. The eutrophication episodes were assessed by an existing scale for the Aegean coastal waters based on chl a, whereas the necessary nutrient concentrations (N and P) for the development of such episodes were defined using a probabilistic procedure. Finally, for the linking between nutrient loading arriving at the gulf and the resulting nutrient enrichment of the marine ecosystem, three loading factors were applied, developed by Vollenweider for lake and marine ecosystems. The first assumes no exchange between the embayment and the open sea, whereas the two others take into account water renewal time. Only the threshold for inorganic nitrogen estimated by the first factor was exceeded in the study area during February after a strong rainfall event coinciding with a eutrophication episode observed in the interior of the gulf, implying that the waters of the gulf are rather confined and the receiving body operates as a lake. The degree of confinement was further examined by studying the temperature, salinity, and density distributions inside the gulf and across the channel connecting the gulf to the open sea. It was found that the incoming freshwater from the watershed during winter results to the formation of a dilute surface layer of low salinity and density, clearly isolated from the open sea. The nutrients from the river inputs are diluted into this isolated water mass and the eutrophication threshold for nitrogen is exceeded. Although phosphorus loading was also high during winter, the corresponding limits were never exceeded. The proposed methodology sets a quantitative relationship between terrestrial nutrient loading and the development of eutrophication episodes in coastal embayments, assuming that information on the physical setting of the system is available. These cause-and-effect relationships can be invaluable tools for managers and decision makers in the framework of Integrated Coastal Zone Management

    Eutrophication

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    Aquatic plants need two essential nutrients for growth: phosphorus and nitrogen. They receive these nutrients through a process known as eutrophication, in which water bodies accumulate plant nutrients. In a healthy lake both nutrients occur in limited amounts, restricting plant growth. However, human factors can dramatically increase the concentration of plant nutrients in water bodies, a phenomenon known as “cultural eutrophication”. The rise in eutrophic events has been attributed to the rapid increase in intensive agricultural practices, industrial activities, and population growth which together have increased nitrogen and phosphorus flows in the environment. When you are citing the document, use the following link http://essuir.sumdu.edu.ua/handle/123456789/3112
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