K-State Research Exchange

    Effects of sodium, chloride, and sodium metabisulfite in nursery and grow-finish pig diets

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    Master of ScienceDepartment of Animal Sciences and IndustryRobert D. GoodbandMichael D. TokachA total of 12,229 pigs were used in nine experiments to determine the effects of Na, Cl, and sodium metabisulfite-based feed additives on pig growth performance. Experiments 1, 2, and 3 were conducted to determine the effects of added dietary salt on growth performance of pigs weighing 7 to 10, 11 to 30, and 27 to 65 kg. The BLL models suggested the optimal dietary added salt concentration to maximize ADG for pigs weighing 7 to 10 and 11 to 30 kg was 0.59% (0.34% Na and 0.58% Cl) and 0.51% added salt (0.22% Na and 0.42% Cl), respectively. There was no evidence to indicate that growth of 27 to 65 kg pigs was improved beyond a 0.10% added salt inclusion (0.11% Na and 0.26% Cl). Experiments 4, 5, and 6 were conducted to determine the effects of source and concentration of Na and Cl on the growth performance of pigs weighing 7 to 12 kg. In Exp. 4, pigs fed an added salt diet that contains a Na and Cl concentration of 0.35% and 0.60% had greater growth performance compared to pigs fed a deficient Na concentration of 0.18%. In Exp. 5, pigs fed a Na concentration of 0.35%, regardless of ion source, had improved ADG compared to pigs fed a Na concentration of 0.13% or 0.57%. In Exp. 6, maximum ADG and G:F could be obtained with a Cl concentration of 0.38% based on the BLL and QP models. Experiments 7, 8, and 9 were conducted to evaluate the effects of Product 1 (Provimi, Brooksville, OH), Product 2 (Nutriquest, Mason City, IA), and sodium metabisulfite (SMB) on the growth performance of nursery pigs weighing approximately 6 to 25 kg. In Exp. 7, pigs fed Product 1 had higher ADG compared to pigs fed the control. In Exp. 8, pigs fed either Product 1 or 2 at the highest concentration and for the longest period of time had greater ADG compared to pigs fed the control diet. In Exp. 9, pigs fed SMB or Product 1 had greater ADG compared to pigs fed a lower concentration of SMB and the control

    Jayhawker, v. 2, no. 7 (Apr. 15, 1904)

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    The Jayhawker newsletter was an alumni publication at Kansas State University that started August 1, 1902. It was published semi-quarterly and continued until 1907 when the name changed to The Alumnus which continued until circa 1910.Citation: Jayhawker, 2(7) (Apr. 15, 1904

    Jayhawker, v. 3, no. 10 (Jun. 1905)

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    The Jayhawker newsletter was an alumni publication at Kansas State University that started August 1, 1902. It was published semi-quarterly and continued until 1907 when the name changed to The Alumnus which continued until circa 1910.Citation: Jayhawker, 3(10) (Jun. 1905

    Jayhawker, v. 4, no. 5 (Mar. 1906)

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    The Jayhawker newsletter was an alumni publication at Kansas State University that started August 1, 1902. It was published semi-quarterly and continued until 1907 when the name changed to The Alumnus which continued until circa 1910.Citation: Jayhawker, 4(5) (Mar. 1906

    Jayhawker, v. 5, no. 9 (May 1907)

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    The Jayhawker newsletter was an alumni publication at Kansas State University that started August 1, 1902. It was published semi-quarterly and continued until 1907 when the name changed to The Alumnus which continued until circa 1910.Citation: Jayhawker, 5(9) (May 1907

    An investigation into risk and resiliency in gender and sexual minority emerging adults

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    Doctor of PhilosophySchool of Family Studies and Human ServicesElaine M. JohannesThe life-span theoretical framework contends that development occurs throughout the entire life-span and that experiences at one stage of life influence later development (Baltes, 1987). With this in mind, the present studies explore the developmental experiences of gender and sexual minority (GSM) individuals as they make the transition to adulthood. The first study found that overall, there were no major differences in GSM emerging adults’ perceptions of this developmental stage when measured using the Inventory of the Dimensions of Emerging Adulthood (IDEA). The second study situated group identification as a process of identity development and found that identifying with the GSM community was a protective factor for GSM emerging adults. Higher attributions to prejudice were associated with increases in well-being when explained through group identification even though the direct effect was negative. The final study found that, similarly to their heterosexual and cisgender peers, GSM individuals’ self-esteem develops in quadratic fashion over the transition to adulthood and that perceptions of familial understanding in adolescence was significantly associated with both the initial level and the rate of change of self-esteem for this population. Implications for further research are discussed

    Approximation of p-modulus in the plane with discrete grids

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    Doctor of PhilosophyDepartment of MathematicsPietro Poggi-CorradiniThis thesis contains four chapters. In the first chapter, the theory of continuous p-modulus in the plane is introduced and the background p-modulus properties are provided. Modulus is a minimization problem that gives a measure of the richness of families of curves in the plane. As the main example, we compute the modulus of a 2-by-1 rectangle using complex analytic methods. We also introduce discrete modulus on a graph and its basic properties. We end the first chapter by providing the relationship between connecting modulus and harmonic functions. This is the fact that computing the modulus of the family of walks from a to b is equivalent to minimizing the energy over all potentials with boundary values 0 at a and 1 at b. In the second chapter, we are interested in the connection between the continuous and the discrete modulus. We study the behavior of side-to-side modulus under some grid refinements and find an upper bound for the discrete modulus using the concept of Fulkerson duality between paths and cuts. These calculations show that the refinement will lower the discrete modulus. Since connecting modulus can also be computed by minimizing the Dirichlet energy of potential functions, we recall an argument of Jacqueline Lelong-Ferrand, that shows how refining a square grid in a ''geometric'' fashion, naturally decreases the 2- the energy of a potential. This monotonicity can be used to prove the convergence between continuous and discrete modulus. We first review the linear theory of discrete holomorphicity and harmonicity as provided by Skopenkov and Werness. Instead of reviewing their work in full generality, we present the outline of their arguments in the special case of square grids. Then use these results to prove the convergence between the continuous and discrete case. We believe that our method of proof generalizes to the full case of quadrangular grids that Werness studies. In the third chapter, we show how to generalize all our proofs for 2-modulus to the case of quadrangular grids with some geometric conditions on the lengths of edges and the angles between them. In the last chapter, a connection with potentials when p is not 2 is discussed in the square grid case. We study the behavior of side-to-side p-modulus under the same refinements as before and we find upper bound for the p-modulus, but only when p > 2. The rest of the chapter is dedicated to generalizing the results from Chapter 2 to the case 2 < p

    Examining the influence of e-Health in motivating cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination among college students

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    Master of ScienceDepartment of Journalism and Mass CommunicationsNancy W. MuturiBackground: Cervical cancer is one of the leading lethal diseases diagnosed in women globally. By early diagnosis and vaccine, cervical cancer can be prevented. Young adults are mainly at risk of cancer-causing HPV. But they are not motivated to take HPV vaccine and screening test. It is crucial to communicate young adults by education and information about cancer. Electronic health (e-Health) communication strategy has the potential to raise awareness about cancer prevention and control. This study examined the key motivational determinants that are associated with college student’s cervical cancer and HPV prevention behavior in relation to their online health information seeking behavior. Method: An online survey among college students (n= 405), age range 18- 35 years was conducted. All measures were from validated instruments and modified to examine the current study’s objectives structured with key variables derived from the Protection-Motivation theory (PMT). Data from the survey were analyzed statistically using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. The reliability of the scales used was assessed through the calculation of coefficient alpha and the dimensionality of the scale was tested through confirmatory factor analysis using the principal components method of extraction. Descriptive of the study variables, Pearson correlation coefficient, One-way ANOVA, and multiple linear regression analysis were done to test the research questions and hypothesis. Results: Result showed that, perceived vulnerability to HPV (β= .17, t= 4.53, p= .000), self-efficacy (β= .13, t= 2.91, p< .01), and response costs (β= .46, t= 10.44, p= .000) were the key motivational variables that are associated with college student’s HPV vaccine and Pap test. In testing predictors for online health information seeking behavior, perceived response-efficacy (β= .20, t= 3.41, p= .001) and response costs (β= .19, t= 3.21, p= .001) gained significance in the model. Also, a Pearson correlation coefficient showed a positive association between college student’s online health information seeking behavior and motivation for preventive measures (r = .10, p = .05). Result demonstrated that, college student’s knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer influenced their motivation for HPV vaccine and Pap test (p< .001) but knowledge did not influence their online health information seeking behavior (p= .43). Conclusion: E-Health strategy can be an effective tool for targeting young adults and should be explored further in cancer communication and vaccine promotion. It is important for cancer communication interventions to promote e-Health strategy and enhance the usage of online health information seeking behavior. The contents of online health education and information need to be upgraded to provide the maximum benefits to the public

    Always a lighthouse, toujours un homme: exploring non-literal translation techniques in video game localizations or the purposes of second language acquisition

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    Master of ArtsDepartment of Modern LanguagesMelinda CroMany recent video games feature complex narratives that contain increasing amounts of written and spoken language. There has thus been growing need for them to be localized into other languages; that is, translated and adapted for markets where languages other than the video game’s language of development are spoken. While the localization process shares many similarities with other projects of translation, because the primary goal of a video game is to be entertaining, video game localization teams are allowed certain creative liberties in translating video games in order to maximize entertainment for players in target markets. Non-literal translation techniques, including transposition, modulation, equivalence, and adaptation, are used to avoid mistranslating in-game language. However, Mangiron and O’Hagan identify in their 2006 analysis of the English localization of Final Fantasy X certain “transcreation” techniques that are used by localization teams in order to make video games more entertaining for players in other markets. These transcreation techniques include the addition of linguistic variation, the re-naming of in-game terminology, the re-creation of wordplay, “contextualization by addition”, and the deliberate use of regional expressions. These transcreation techniques not only serve to make the localized version of a video game more entertaining for a target market, but also make the gameplay experience more original for players in these markets. This study will analyze non-literal translation techniques and “transcreation” techniques in the French localization of BioShock Infinite: Burial at Sea Episode 2 to determine how these translation techniques may be used to maximize entertainment and to create a more original gameplay experience for francophone players, followed by a discussion of how video game localizations may be implemented in second language acquisition contexts for the purposes of exploring certain L2 linguistic and cultural phenomena

    Developing and evaluating a geographic information dashboard to improve spatial task performance

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    Master of ArtsDepartment of GeographyJ. M. Shawn HutchinsonInformation dashboards are decision-support tools that pull data from multiple sources and display those data on a single screen. Information dashboards are becoming common in fields such as medicine, computer science, and business, given their perceived ability to facilitate faster and more accurate assessments by users. However, there is very little peer-reviewed research on information dashboards that support this assumption. This research focuses on applying the concept of an information dashboard visualization within the spatial sciences and evaluating the effectiveness of a geographic information dashboard, or GID, on improving user performance related to spatial thinking tasks. A review of literature from multiple disciplines highlights what is, and what is not, understood about dashboard visualizations. Borrowing from ideas such as Cognitive Fit Theory and past work in evaluating the effectiveness of map animations, an appropriate method for evaluating the GID is proposed. A Web-based GID and an alternative “tabbed” visualization were developed using the R Shiny package to support an analysis of grassland vegetation development for a site located in northeastern Kansas. A controlled experiment was conducted using a survey completed by volunteer student participants who responded to a series of benchmark tasks related to the interpretation of 6 related maps and graphs. Data for three dependent variables (task completion time, task response accuracy, and an integrative measure of performance accounting for both time and accuracy) were collected directly from the survey or post-survey grading of responses. Three independent variables and their impact on spatial task performance were analyzed, including the type of visualization, assessed spatial thinking ability, and cognitive task type. Results showed that participants using the GID completed the benchmark tasks faster and more accurately, but that a users’ spatial thinking ability had the most significant influence on performance regardless of visualization. Evidence was found to support the idea that the GID improved spatial thinking performance, especially for users with more experience in spatial reasoning, and that the GID format may improve user performance beyond what is expected based on an independent assessment of spatial thinking ability
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