4,307 research outputs found

    Calcium and magnesium absorption and retention by growing goats offered diets with different calcium sources.

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    Calcium addition is necessary in order to balance the high phosphorus concentrations that are characteristic of high-concentrate ruminant diets. However, calcium sources differ in their bioavailability. Our objective was to determine apparent Ca and Mg absorption and retention in goats offered diets containing different sources of Ca. Spanish-Boer goats (n=18; 19.6 ± 1.88 kg) were stratified by BW and sex and randomized to dietary treatments consisting of Purina Antlermax 16 containing either calcium carbonate (CC), Calmin (CM) or Milk Cal (MC). Goats were adapted to a control, corn-based high-concentrate diet on pasture and then moved to individual 1.0 × 1.5 m pens with plastic coated expanded metal floors, and adjusted to their respective diets along with removal of hay from the diet over a 7-d period. Goats were then offered their respective diets at a total of 2% of BW in equal feedings at 0830 and 1700h for an additional 14-d adaption period to diet and facilities followed by a 7-d collection of total urine and feces. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED of SAS. Calcium and Mg intake were not different (P ≄ 0.12) among diets. Calcium and Mg apparent absorption and retention (g/d and % of intake) were greatest (P \u3c 0.05) in goats offered CC and did not differ (P ≄ 0.20) between goats offered the CM and MC diets. Therefore, calcium and magnesium were more available for goats from the diet containing calcium carbonate compared with diets containing Calmin and Milk Cal

    Perceptions of the Underrepresentation of Women in Agriculture and Motives for Movement into the Industry

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    In the U.S., agriculture has historically been a male-dominated industry. Women have been underrepresented in agriculture even as they have played important roles on and off the farm. In the last 25 years, however, women have been moving into agriculture and increasing their visibility in positions on and off the farm even in light of structural changes to agriculture and environmental concerns. Learning motives for moves into the industry can help supply information about the changing roles of women in agriculture and help determine whether agricultural trends follow other occupational trends. Giving a voice to women that have been underrepresented can help them continue to alter the roles expected of them and policies can be developed to support them. An in-depth literature review and 16 in-depth interviews were conducted in the Midwest region of the United States. Twelve interviewees had roles on the farm, 7 women had roles off the farm, and 3 women had roles on and off the farm. It was found that women have been underrepresented for a number of reasons including the social construction of gender, patriarchal households, documentation issues, cultural and familial changes. Regardless, women are changing the roles expected of them and opportunities are increasing, especially in the sustainable agriculture, locavore and local food movement. Agriculture does not follow the occupational trends of women moving into male-dominated industries and women have multiple reasons for moving into the industry. Technical and social barriers women experience when they enter agriculture have been overcome with networking

    Shifting Notions of Citizenship in the Netherlands: exploring cultural citizenship and the politics of belonging through neighbourhood spaces in Rotterdam

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    Notions of citizenship in the Netherlands are increasingly shifting away from liberal models of civic citizenship that, in theory, promote diversity, pluralism and, multicultural understandings of citizenship and are moving, instead, towards a mono-cultural and assimilationist understanding of national identity and belonging. This trend, known in the literature as the ‘culturalization of citizenship’ constitutes the primary topic of this project. In this dissertation, I argue that official and populist discourses concerning non-western Muslim immigrants in Dutch society today work to inscribe difference onto “foreign” (“allochthonous”) residents of the Netherlands while upholding an idealized notion of “Dutch identity”. My research revealed that it was not just government-sponsored integration programs that reproduced dominant understandings of belonging or difference through integration activities, but also, the everyday discursive practices of Dutch “natives” (called “autochthons”) who, at times inadvertently, reproduce exclusionary notions of national identity and belonging. My ethnographic research, based in three different neighbourhoods in Rotterdam (Bergpolder, Liskwartier, and Nieuwe Westen), revealed how local and national discourses of belonging are expressed in everyday practices. Although other scholars have explored immigrants’ integration and the politics of belonging in the Netherlands, this project takes a unique approach by exploring ideas of belonging using space as an entry point for analysis, paying particular attention to how individuals’ use, access and understand neighbourhood public places. Using Ryan Centner’s concept of ‘spatial capital’, I argue that “autochthonous” individuals are more spatially privileged in their ability to define and design public places in the neighbourhood than individuals who would be perceived as “allochthonous”. Contrary to the declared objectives of official citizenship “tests” and integration programs, the process itself reproduces boundaries and differences between “autochthons” and “allochthons”

    Negotiating Identity through Public Spaces in the Netherlands

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    Urban Agriculture Needs Assessment and Natural Resource Conservation Service Employee Workflow Development

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    Urban agriculture has been expanding over the past few decades and one driving factor is all communities wanting access to fresh, healthy food options (Grebitus, 2021). The increase in small community gardens can nourish the health and social fabric of communities along with creating economic opportunities for farmers and neighborhood

    Global Food Security and Intellectual Property Rights

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    Article published in the Michigan State International Law Review

    Use of narrative style in broadcast news

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    Professional project report submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Journalism from the School of Journalism, University of Missouri--Columbia.This research examines how reporters and photographers can use narrative style in daily news stories and in long-form investigative and feature pieces. It also addresses the objectivity of the story style. This research was conducted through semi-structured in-depth interviews with 11 recognized storytellers. Research participants said total objectivity is unattainable in any story style because of a journalist's own biases and worldly experiences. However, data analysis showed there is a divide between respondents about using narrative style for story topics that are controversial or political. There was a link here with research question one. Respondents who said the narrative style could be used everyday for every story topic, also said the narrative is just as objective, if not more objective than the inverted pyramid style. Respondents, who said's hard to use the narrative everyday because it shouldn't be used for every story topic, also said the narrative opens the door to less objectivity. Because television viewership is changing, some stations are turning to narrative style to better engage viewers, because of this, it is important to better understand how to use the style and whether or not the style is believed to be objective.Includes bibliographic references
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