13 research outputs found

    Pointwise wave behavior of the Navier-Stokes equations in half space

    Get PDF
    In this paper, we investigate the pointwise behavior of the solution for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with mixed boundary condition in half space. Our results show that the leading order of Green's function for the linear system in half space are heat kernels propagating with sound speed in two opposite directions and reflected heat kernel (due to the boundary effect) propagating with positive sound speed. With the strong wave interactions, the nonlinear analysis exhibits the rich wave structure: the diffusion waves interact with each other and consequently, the solution decays with algebraic rate.Comment: Comments and references are added and some typos are corrected. Accepted by DCDS-

    Pointwise wave behavior of the Navier-Stokes equations in half space

    Full text link
    In this paper, we investigate the pointwise behavior of the solution for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with mixed boundary condition in half space. Our results show that the leading order of Green's function for the linear system in half space are heat kernels propagating with sound speed in two opposite directions and reflected heat kernel (due to the boundary effect) propagating with positive sound speed. With the strong wave interactions, the nonlinear analysis exhibits the rich wave structure: the diffusion waves interact with each other and consequently, the solution decays with algebraic rate.Comment: Comments and references are added and some typos are corrected. Accepted by DCDS-

    Boundary Wave and Interior Wave Propagations

    Get PDF
    Ph.DDOCTOR OF PHILOSOPH

    Emergence of a periodically rotating one-point cluster in a thermodynamic Cucker-Smale ensemble

    No full text
    We study emergent behaviors of thermomechanical Cucker-Smale (TCS) ensemble confined in a harmonic potential field. In the absence of external force field, emergent dynamics of TCS particles has been extensively studied recently under various frameworks formulated in terms of initial configuration, system parameters and network topologies. Moreover, the TCS model does not exhibit rotating motions in the absence of an external force field. In this paper, we show the emergence of periodically rotating onepoint cluster for the TCS model in a harmonic potential field using elementary energy estimates and continuity argument. We also provide several numerical simulations and compare them with analytical results.N

    Emergence of a periodically rotating one-point cluster in a thermodynamic Cucker-Smale ensemble

    No full text
    We study emergent behaviors of thermomechanical Cucker-Smale (TCS) ensemble confined in a harmonic potential field. In the absence of external force field, emergent dynamics of TCS particles has been extensively studied recently under various frameworks formulated in terms of initial configuration, system parameters and network topologies. Moreover, the TCS model does not exhibit rotating motions in the absence of an external force field. In this paper, we show the emergence of periodically rotating onepoint cluster for the TCS model in a harmonic potential field using elementary energy estimates and continuity argument. We also provide several numerical simulations and compare them with analytical results.N

    Bifidobacterium reduced the severity and incidence of NEC in a rat NEC model.

    No full text
    <p><b>(A)</b> Body weight changes. *<i>P</i> < 0.01 vs the control group, <sup>#</sup><i>P</i> < 0.01 vs the NEC group, n = 9–11 animals per group. Three independent experiments were performed in duplicate. <b>(B)</b> Macroscopic appearance of the gastrointestinal tract. In rat pups with NEC, dilation, significant hemorrhage, and discoloration were seen in the terminal ileum. <b>(C)</b> Images of H&E staining using light microscopy. The histological changes in the terminal ilea (representative images) in the control, NEC and BIF groups. Magnification: ×20. <b>(D)</b> Intestinal histological score. *<i>P</i> < 0.01 vs the control group, <sup>#</sup><i>P</i> < 0.01 vs the NEC group, n = 6 animals per group.</p

    Bifidobacterium prevented the disruption of TJ in a rat NEC model.

    No full text
    <p><b>(A)</b> TJ proteins localization was evaluated by Immunohistochemical staining in the terminal ileum of neonatal rats. Representative slides for control, NEC, and BIF were shown. Magnification: ×40, n = 3 to 6 per group. <b>(B)</b> Western blot for TJ proteins. Terminal ilea were subjected to immunoblotting for ZO-1, occludin claudin-3 and β-actin. Representative results of one experiment are shown. Similar results were obtained in three independent experiments: control group, NEC group, BIF group. <b>(C)</b> The intensity of the bands was quantified by scanning densitometry, standardized with respect to β-actin protein and expressed as mean ± SD fold change compared with control animals.*<i>P</i> < 0.01, <sup>##</sup><i>P</i> < 0.05 vs the control group, <sup>#</sup><i>P</i> < 0.01, **<i>P</i> < 0.05 vs the NEC group.</p

    Bifidobacterium prevented the disruption of TJ in vitro.

    No full text
    <p><b>(A)</b> Electron micrographs reveal the changes of intact TJ in vehicle group, LPS group and LPS+BIF group. <b>(B)</b> Immunofluorescence staining of TJ proteins localization in Caco-2 cells with or without LPS and BIF. Magnification: ×40. <b>(C)</b> Western blot for TJ proteins. Caco-2 cells were grown and treated with LPS and BIF and lysed. The lysates were used for immunoblotting for claudin-3, occludin, ZO-1 and β-actin. Representative results of one experiment are shown. Similar results were obtained in three independent experiments: vehicle group, LPS group, LPS+BIF group. <b>(D)</b> The intensity of the bands was quantified by scanning densitometry, standardized with respect to β-actin protein and expressed as mean ± SD fold change compared with vehicle cells. *<i>P</i> < 0.01 vs the vehicle group, <sup>#</sup><i>P</i> < 0.01 vs the LPS group.</p

    Genetic associations of leisure sedentary behaviors and the risk of 15 site‐specific cancers: A Mendelian randomization study

    No full text
    Abstract Background and Aims Leisure sedentary behavior (LSB) is associated with the risk of cancer, but the causal relationship between them has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to assess the potential causal association between LSB and risk of 15 site‐specific cancers. Methods The causal association between LSB and cancer were assessed with univariate Mendelian randomization (UVMR) and multivariate Mendelian randomization (MVMR). 194 SNPs associated with LSB (from the UK Biobank 408,815 individuals) were adopted as the instrument variables. Sensitivity analyses were performed to ensure the robustness of the results. Results UVMR analysis revealed that television watching significantly increased the risk of endometrial cancer (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.02–1.64, p = 0.04) (mainly the endometrioid histology [OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.02–1.60, p = 0.031]),breast cancer (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.04–1.30, p = 0.007) (both ER+ breast cancer [OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.33, p = 0.015], and ER− breast cancer [OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.26–1.89, p = 2.23 × 10−5]). Although causal association was not found between television watching and ovarian cancer, it was seen in low grade and low malignant potential serous ovarian cancer (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.07–2.08, p = 0.018). However, significant results were not obtained in the UVMR analysis between driving, computer use and the 15 types of cancer. Further MVMR analysis indicated that the above results are independent from most metabolic factors and dietary habits, but mediated by educational attainment. Conclusion LSB in form of television watching has independent causal association with the risk of endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer
    corecore