3,474 research outputs found

    Jet production in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

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    Recent results from jet production in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA are reviewed. The values of alpha_s(M_z) extracted from a QCD analysis of the data are presented.Comment: 9 pages, 5 figures, talk given at the ``Ringberg workshop: New trends in HERA Physics 2003'

    Precision measurements of alphas at HERA

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    Recent determinations of alphas(Mz) from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations using inclusive-jet cross-section measurements in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at high Q2 are presented. A combined value of alphas(mz)=0.1198 +- 0.0019 (exp.) +- 0.0026 (th.) was obtained from these measurements. The determinations of alphas at various scales clearly show the running of the coupling from HERA jet data alone and in agreement with the prediction of QCD.Comment: 5 pages, 4 figure

    Production of Z0 bosons in elastic and quasi-elastic ep collisions at HERA

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    Artículo escrito por un elevado número de autores, solo se referencian el que aparece en primer lugar, el nombre del grupo de colaboración, si le hubiere, y los autores pertenecientes a la UAMThe production of Z0 bosons in the reaction ep →eZ0 p(∗), where p(∗) stands for a proton or a lowmass nucleon resonance, has been studied in ep collisions at HERA using the ZEUS detector. The analysis is based on a data sample collected between 1996 and 2007, amounting to 496 pb−1 of integrated luminosity. The Z0 was measured in the hadronic decay mode. The elasticity of the events was ensured by a cut on ηmax < 3.0, where ηmax is the maximum pseudorapidity of energy deposits in the calorimeter defined with respect to the proton beam direction. A signal was observed at the Z0 mass. The cross section of the reaction ep → eZ0 p(∗) was measured to be σ(ep → eZ0 p(∗)) =0.13 ± 0.06(stat.) ± 0.01(syst.) pb, in agreement with the Standard Model prediction of 0.16 pb. This is the first measurement of Z0 production in ep collisionsWe appreciate the contributions to the construction and maintenance of the ZEUS detector of many people who are not listed as authors. The HERA machine group and the DESY computing staff are especially acknowledged for their success in providing excellent operation of the collider and the data-analysis environment. We thank the DESY directorate for their strong support and encouragemen

    Measurements of W H and ZH production in the H → bb¯ decay channel in pp collisions at 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

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    Artículo escrito por un elevado número de autores, solo se referencian el que aparece en primer lugar, el nombre del grupo de colaboración, si le hubiere, y los autores pertenecientes a la UA

    Combination of searches for WW, WZ, and ZZ resonances in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

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    Artículo escrito por un elevado número de autores, solo se referencian el que aparece en primer lugar, el nombre del grupo de colaboración, si le hubiere, y los autores pertenecientes a la UAMThe ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider has performed searches for new, heavy bosons decaying to WW, WZ and ZZ final states in multiple decay channels using 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data at √s=8 TeV. In the current study, the results of these searches are combined to provide a more stringent test of models predicting heavy resonances with couplings to vector bosons. Direct searches for a charged diboson resonance decaying to WZ in the ℓνℓ'ℓ' (ℓ=μ, e), ℓℓqq-, ℓνqq- and fully hadronic final states are combined and upper limits on the rate of production times branching ratio to the WZ bosons are compared with predictions of an extended gauge model with a heavy W' boson. In addition, direct searches for a neutral diboson resonance decaying to WW and ZZ in the ℓℓqq-, ℓνqq-, and fully hadronic final states are combined and upper limits on the rate of production times branching ratio to the WW and ZZ bosons are compared with predictions for a heavy, spin-2 graviton in an extended Randall-Sundrum model where the Standard Model fields are allowed to propagate in the bulk of the extra dimensionWe acknowledge the support of ANPCyT, Argentina; YerPhI, Armenia; ARC, Australia; BMWFW and FWF, Austria; ANAS, Azer-baijan; SSTC, Belarus; CNPq and FAPESP, Brazil; NSERC, NRC and CFI, Canada; CERN; CONICYT, Chile; CAS, MOST and NSFC, China; COLCIENCIAS, Colombia; MSMT CR, MPO CR and VSC CR, Czech Republic; DNRF, DNSRC and Lundbeck Foundation, Denmark; IN2P3-CNRS, CEA-DSM/IRFU, France; GNSF, Georgia; BMBF, HGF, and MPG, Germany; GSRT, Greece; RGC, Hong Kong SAR, China; ISF, I-CORE and Benoziyo Center, Israel; INFN, Italy; MEXT and JSPS, Japan; CNRST, Morocco; FOM and NWO, Netherlands; RCN, Norway; MNiSW and NCN, Poland; FCT, Portugal; MNE/IFA, Roma-nia; MES of Russia and NRC KI, Russian Federation; JINR; MESTD, Serbia; MSSR, Slovakia; ARRS and MIZŠ, Slovenia; DST/NRF, South Africa; MINECO, Spain; SRC and Wallenberg Foundation, Sweden; SERI, SNSF and Cantons of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland; MOST, Taiwan; TAEK, Turkey; STFC, United Kingdom; DOE and NSF, United States. In addition, individual groups and members have received support from BCKDF, the Canada Council, CANARIE, CRC, Com-pute Canada, FQRNT, and the Ontario Innovation Trust, Canada; EPLANET, ERC, FP7, Horizon 2020 and Marie Skłodowska-Curie Ac-tions, European Union; Investissements d’Avenir Labex and Idex, ANR, Region Auvergne and Fondation Partager le Savoir, France; DFG and AvH Foundation, Germany; Herakleitos, Thales and Aris-teia programmes co-financed by EU-ESF and the Greek NSRF; BSF, GIF and Minerva, Israel; BRF, Norway; the Royal Society and Lever-hulme Trust, United Kingdom. The crucial computing support from all WLCG partners is acknowledged gratefully, in particular from CERN and the ATLAS Tier-1facilities at TRIUMF (Canada), NDGF (Denmark, Norway, Sweden), CC-IN2P3 (France), KIT/GridKA (Germany), INFN-CNAF (Italy), NL-T1 (Netherlands), PIC (Spain), ASGC (Taiwan), RAL (UK) aneplad BNL (USA) and in the Tier-2 facilities worldwid

    Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

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    Journal of High Energy Physics 2016.11 (2016): 110 reproduced by permission of Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA)Artículo escrito por muchos autores, sólo se referencian el que aparece en primer lugar, el nombre del grupo de colaboración y los autores que firman como pertenecientes a la UAMInclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-ofmass energy of √ s = 7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.3 pb−1 , collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum pT ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| ≤ 4.4, and at least one having pT ≥ 42.5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be fDPS = 0.092 +0.005 −0.011 (stat.) +0.033 −0.037 (syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σeff, was determined to be σeff = 14.9 +1.2 −1.0 (stat.) +5.1 −3.8 (syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σeff, performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21+7 −6% of the total inelastic cross-section measured at √ s = 7 TeV. The distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also providedWe acknowledge the support of ANPCyT, Argentina; YerPhI, Armenia; ARC, Australia; BMWFW and FWF, Austria; ANAS, Azerbaijan; SSTC, Belarus; CNPq and FAPESP, Brazil; NSERC, NRC and CFI, Canada; CERN; CONICYT, Chile; CAS, MOST and NSFC, China; COLCIENCIAS, Colombia; MSMT CR, MPO CR and VSC CR, Czech Republic; DNRF and DNSRC, Denmark; IN2P3-CNRS, CEA-DSM/IRFU, France; GNSF, Georgia; BMBF, HGF, and MPG, Germany; GSRT, Greece; RGC, Hong Kong SAR, China; ISF, I-CORE and Benoziyo Center, Israel; INFN, Italy; MEXT and JSPS, Japan; CNRST, Morocco; FOM and NWO, Netherlands; RCN, Norway; MNiSW and NCN, Poland; FCT, Portugal; MNE/IFA, Romania; MES of Russia and NRC KI, Russian Federation; JINR; MESTD, Serbia; MSSR, Slovakia; ARRS and MIZS, Slovenia; DST/NRF, South Africa; MINECO, Spain; SRC and Wallenberg Foundation, Sweden; SERI, SNSF and Cantons of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland; MOST, Taiwan; TAEK, Turkey; STFC, United Kingdom; DOE and NSF, United States of America. In addition, individual groups and members have received support from BCKDF, the Canada Council, CANARIE, CRC, Compute Canada, FQRNT, and the Ontario Innovation Trust, Canada; EPLANET, ERC, FP7, Horizon 2020 and Marie Sklodowska- Curie Actions, European Union; Investissements d’Avenir Labex and Idex, ANR, Région Auvergne and Fondation Partager le Savoir, France; DFG and AvH Foundation, Germany; Herakleitos, Thales and Aristeia programmes cofinanced by EU-ESF and the Greek NSRF; BSF, GIF and Minerva, Israel; BRF, Norway; Generalitat de Catalunya, Generalitat Valenciana, Spain; the Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust, United Kingdo
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