40,896 research outputs found

    Hebrews 5:7 as the Cry of the Davidic Sufferer

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    This article proposes a better source for the Son’s cry in Hebrews 5:7. It begins by surveying sources previous scholars have identified, including Jesus’ cry in Gethsemane and Golgotha, several Psalms, and the Maccabean martyr literature. It is then argued that these background sources for the language are insufficient. Instead the author of Hebrews has an entire motif from the Psalter as his informing source: the Davidic figure that cries out in trust to be delivered from a death-like experience. Firstly, the motif of the Davidic righteous suffering in the LXX Psalms is demonstrated. Secondly, Hebrews’ use of the Messianic royal figure is demonstrated and thirdly, Hebrews 5:7 as a portrait of the Christ who cries out for deliverance is demonstrated. Thus, Hebrews 5:7 sees the Son as the Davidic king who is the true representative human exercising trust in YHWH, bringing to fulfilment the theme from various Psalms

    The Obedience of Sonship: Adamic Obedience as the Grounds for Heavenly Ascension in the Book of Hebrews

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    This thesis makes a unique contribution in the field of New Testament studies with specific attention to New Testament theology and the Christology of Hebrews. It explores the relationship between Sonship and the ascension in the book of Hebrews. It argues that the ascension of Jesus reveals the nature of his Sonship. First, chapters two and three of this study examine the Sonship of Jesus in Hebrews 1. It portrays Jesus as both the Messianic and the divine eternal Son. While recent scholarship has questioned whether the Son in Hebrews is a divine Sonship, this thesis demonstrates that Hebrews portrays Jesus as divine. Second, this study argues that Heb. 2 contains a “Second Adam Christology.” The Son shares in true humanity and is appointed to fulfill the destiny of humanity. In this humanity, he is crowned with glory and honor in fulfillment of Ps. 8. The Son stands in solidaric representation of the people of God. This second Adam function is both kingly and priestly as representative who leads God’s people to this glory. Third, as this eschatological man who is crowned as king and priest the Son ascends into heaven. This is set against the background of apocalyptic literature where heaven is a temple and the dwelling place of God. The Son is portrayed in Hebrews as ascending into a true tabernacle that is heaven itself. He enters heaven as both king and priest of the age to come because he himself has first come to participate in the age to come. Finally, the study demonstrates that the obedience of the Son qualifies him for his ascension and eschatological ‘perfection.’ We argue that the theme of obedient trust and crying out to God is an Adamic-Davidic role with a Psalmic background. We conclude, in the book of Hebrews, Christ is the eternal Son who also functions in the Adam-David role of sonship. His actions as the true human exercising trust and obedience qualify him to ascend up into heaven crowned with humanity’s eschatological glory

    Hebrews and Work

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    Introduction to Hebrews Christ Created & Sustains the World (Hebrews 1:1-2:8) The Creation has Become Subject to Evil (Hebrews 2:14-3:6) Life in the Wilderness: Journey to the New World (Hebrews 3:7-4:16) Our Great High Priest (Hebrews 5:1-10:18) Christ\u27s Sacrifice Makes Possible Our Service (Hebrews 5:1-7:28) Christ\u27s Intercession Empowers Our Life and Work (Hebrews 7:1-10:18) Realizing the Faith (Hebrews 10:19-11:40) Enduring Hardship, Pursuing Peace (Hebrews 12:1-16) Shaking Things Up (Hebrews 12:18-29) Hospitality (Hebrews 13:1-3) Money Matters (Hebrews 13:5-6) Working Outside the Camp (Hebrews 13:11-25) Conclusion to Hebrew

    The Heir of Righteousness and the King of Righteousness: The Priestly Noachic Polemics in 2 Enoch and the Epistle to the Hebrews

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    It has previously been noted that 2 (Slavonic) Enoch, a Jewish pseudepigraphon written in the first century CE, contains traces of polemics against the priestly Noachic tradition. In the course of the polemics the role of Noah as the pioneer of animal sacrificial practice to whom God reveals the commandments about the blood becomes transferred to other characters of the story, including the miraculously born priest Melchizedek. In light of the polemics detected in 2 Enoch, it is possible that another work written at the same period of time, namely, the Epistle to the Hebrews—a text which like 2 Enoch deals with the issues of blood, animal sacrificial practice, and the figure of Melchizedek—might also contain implicit polemics against Noah and his role as the originator of such practice. It has been noted before that the author of Hebrews appears to be openly engaged in polemics with the cultic prescriptions (δικαιώματα λατρείας) found in the law of Moses and perpetuated by the descendants of Levi. Yet the origin of animal sacrificial practice and the expiatory understanding of blood can be traced to the figure of Noah, who first performed animal sacrifices on the altar after his disembarkation and who received from God the commandment about the blood. By renouncing the practice of animal sacrifices and invalidating the expiatory significance of the animal blood through the sacrifice of Jesus, who in the Epistle to the Hebrews is associated with the figure of Melchizedek, the authors of the Epistle to the Hebrews appear to be standing in opposition not only to Moses and Levi, but also to Noah. Here again, as in 2 Enoch, the image of Melchizedek serves as a polemical counterpart to Noah and the priestly Noachic tradition, which the hero of the Flood faithfully represented

    Studies in the Epistle to the Hebrews - Lesson 12

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    Exhortation - warning - encouragement in view of access to our great High priest within the veil - Hebrews 10:19-39 Warning against deliberate apostasy Hebrews 10:26-31 Encourage for the persecuted Christian - Hebrews 10:32-39 A kingdom of priest

    NT 641 Exegesis of Hebrews

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    Required Reading: Greek New Testament (Nestle-Aland for comprehensive students or an interlinear for concise students). DeSilva, David. Despising Shame: The Social Function of the Rhetoric of Honor and Shame in the Epistle to the Hebrews. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1996. Lindars, Barnabas. The Theology of the Letter to the Hebrews. New Testament Theology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991. Required: Purchase One Attridge, Harold W. Hebrews. Hermeneia: A Critical and Historical Commentary on the Bible. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1989. Bruce, F. F. The Epistle to the Hebrews. The New International Commentary on the New Testament. Rev. ed. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1990. DeSilva, David. Preserverance in Gratitude: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000. Lane, William L. Hebrews 1-8. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas: Word, 1991. —. Hebrews 9-13. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas: Word, 1991.https://place.asburyseminary.edu/syllabi/3595/thumbnail.jp

    NT 641 Exegesis of Hebrews

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    Required Reading: Greek New Testament (Nestle-Aland for comprehensive students or an interlinear for concise students). Coljin, Brenda, Let Us Approach (in the Readings folder in the Course Center). DeSilva, David. Despising Shame: The Social Function of the Rhetoric of Honor and Shame in the Epistle to the Hebrews. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1995. Lindars, Barnabas. The Theology of the Letter to the Hebrews. New Testament Theology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991. Buy TWO of the following commentaries (Hints below) Attridge, Harold W. Hebrews. Hermeneia: A Critical and Historical Commentary on the Bible. Minneapolis: Fortress, 1989. Bruce, F. F. The Epistle to the Hebrews. The New International Commentary on the New Testament. Rev. ed. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1990. DeSilva, David. Perseverance in Gratitude: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on the Epistle \u27to the Hebrews.\u27 Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000. Lane, William L. Hebrews 1-8. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas: Word, 1991. —. Hebrews 9-13. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas: Word, 1991.https://place.asburyseminary.edu/syllabi/2873/thumbnail.jp

    The Religious Policy of Emperor Heraclius (610-641) in regards to Hebrews

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    Our study sets out to discuss the religious policy of Emperor Heraclius ( 610-641) in regards to Hebrews. Before the relic of the Holy Cross was reinstalled in Jerusalem (31 March 630), Emperor Heraclius's relations with the Hebrews do not seem to be tense. Starting with 630, Heraclius  retaliates against the Hebrews as a punishment for their collaboration with the Persians, as well as for their involvement in the massacre of Christians when Jerusalem was conquered by the Persians (614). The Emperor issued an edict for the forced conversion of Hebrews to Christianity. The scope of this edict covered the entire Byzantine Empire, but it was only enforced in Cartagena (May 31, 632). Saint Maximus the Confessor condemns Heraclius's decision to forcibly convert Cartagena Hebrews to Christianity. Heraclius's decree was contested among the Hebrews. Their forced christening caused their migration to Persia. Also, Heraclius's anti-Hebrew policy determined them to facilitate the Arab expansion in Byzantine territories.    Keywords: religious policy, emperor Heraclius, Hebrews, conversion, baptis

    1. Jerusalem: The Hebrews

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    Long the political and religious center of the Hebrew people and for a brief time the chief center of Christianity, the city of Jerusalem has been chosen to represent the Judeo-Christian heritage of Western Civilization. Jerusalem is older than Rome, possibly even older than Athens (as far as habitation by the Greeks is concerned), and it will be helpful to keep that fact in mind. Solomon lived perhaps before there was a city of Rome. The kingdom of Judah fell almost a century before the Persians attacked Greece. [excerpt

    The Argument of Hebrews

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    This is a commentary on the book of Hebrew
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