North Georgia College & State University: Digital Commons

    Book Review: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

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    Gender Preference on the Use of the UNG Cumming Campus Learning Common

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    At the University of North Georgia, Cumming Campus, the Learning Common is a versatile place that serves as e-library where students search for references, study, and do things that serve them best. This study aims to know whether male and female students at the Cumming Campus of UNG use the library for different purposes. It is hypothesized that male and female UNG students equally use the Cumming Campus library solely for academic purposes. To conduct the investigation we created and printed out a short survey, and placed it in the middle of the library with a sign asking people to fill it out. We placed the survey out on February 2nd 2015 and gathered data for two weeks. We decided to present the data in two different graphs, one bar graph showing what males did in the Library during the two weeks, and one bar graph showing what females did in two weeks. The bar graphs created indicate the percentage of surveyed males and females that participate in activities listed on the survey. The graph depicts that the male UNG student to female UNG student ratio for academic activity is 3:1. Academic activity is categorized to be researching, conducting meetings, surfing the internet, and reading. The results of the experiment reject the hypothesis that male and female students equally use the Cumming Campus library solely for academic purposes. For, it is evident that more male UNG students use the Cumming Campus library for academic activity compared to female UNG students

    The Yellow Wallpaper: A Discussion of Mental Healthcare, Feminism, and Gender Roles Under the Guise of the Supernatural

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    This presentation is a discussion of literary research pertaining to the short story The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. The story is a tale of madness and, to some readers, even supernatural horror but it is clear that Gilman meant it to be read as a piece that would discuss women and the way they were treated in her society. The clearest examples of the author\u27s radical focus in the piece are: the autobiographical elements of the story that make it an honest discussion of mental healthcare for women in the late 1800\u27s, the narrative told about the woman the narrator sees in her wallpaper and all that woman represents, and the traditional gender roles apparent in the narrators relationship with her husband and the other men in the story. The presentation includes both ideas put forth by literary critics and evidence from the work supporting those ideas

    Lost Patriarchs: The Destruction of Traditional Masculinity in Modern Society Portrayed in Tender is the Night, The Sound and the Fury, and The Sun Also Rises

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    Much of the most well-known modern literature seems to directly focus on gender roles and gender issues, a theme that is present in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night, William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, and Earnest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises. In my research project, I will compare and examine each author’s similar portrayal of changing gender roles and how these changes contributed to the formation of the notorious “lost generation.” Using a combination of information from various scholarly articles and a close analysis of each primary text, I will specifically focus on these three modern novelist’s insinuation of how changing ideas of masculinity and femininity, brought about by WWI and modernization, affected the lives of the younger men during the time period; through the symbolism, language, and other literary devices surrounding their primary characters, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and Hemingway indicate the changing idea of a man’s role in family and society as a critical catalyst in the loss of identity and purpose associated with members of the “lost generation.

    Shadows, Day and Night

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    Abstract: Shadows, Day and Night Carl Jung is considered the father of analytic psychology. Scholars and psychologists alike consider his work with the “collective unconscience” to be his crowning achievement. By developing a series of archetypes to describe what he called “the weather conditions of the human brain,” Jung was able to quantify the probable human reaction to emotional stimuli and categorize this response by archetype. The collective conscience is the entity that all of humanity pays into; all of our morals, sins, wrongs, and perceptions have built a constantly changing societal standard that we sometimes compare our behavior to. The collective unconscience is the human reaction, good or bad, that comes in response to our behavior as compared to society’s standards. The shadow is the archetype that descends upon us during times of uncertainty, when we have done something wrong, or when under emotional distress. Bobby Ann Masons “Shiloh” and Billy Joel’s “The Stranger” take different approaches to recognizing and processing the shadow archetype. In “Shiloh,” Mason uses Leroy Moffitt to demonstrate what happens to one who ignores the shadow. In Joel’s song “The Stranger,” the narrator shows what it is like to recognize, come to terms with, and understand the shadow archetype. In the end, both artists demonstrate an individual’s response to the collective conscience, or lack thereof, and how the shadow archetype affects one’s perception when comparing experiences to societal standards

    The Ethics Surrounding Artificial Consciousness in Humanoid Robots

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    Kristian Knowles English 1102 H/K. Redding Research Proposal 26 February 2016 The Ethics Surrounding Artificial Consciousness in Humanoid Robots Science fiction has many challenges and implications connected to artificial consciousness within humanoid robots. The creation and existence of humanoid robots is very complex, which can generate many questions. My research will focus on the ethics surrounding humanoid robots with consciousness. Knowing right from wrong, and having morals is a standard that each human must acquire for themselves. Robots do not have the ability to do so just yet. Is it possible for these robots to possess this trait, or is it far too dangerous? Many challenges we are confronted with are as a result of the existence of conscious humanoid robots. Freedom, personhood, and moral rights are each attributes that robots do not withhold. These features could potentially aid or impair humans depending on how far technology progresses. Through my research, I will display the challenges, implications, and possible solutions that affect the abilities these humanoid robots obtain. Literature such as Laws Surrounding-Science Fiction and Philosophy by Susan Schneider, and The Ethical and Social Implications of Robotics by Patrick Lin will help me increase my knowledge to understand the distinct views on humanoid robots with consciousness. Furthermore, these findings will assist me to discover the solution and complications to why humanoid robots are not capable of certain features yet. The more technology expands, the greater the betterment of these features will be. We must notice the problems associated along the way and realize that more problems could arise, and we might not find the solution to these complications

    A minimal completion of double substochastic matrices

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    Let B be an n x n doubly substochastic matrix and let s be the sum of all entries of B. In this paper we show that B has a sub-defect of k which can be computed by taking the ceiling of (n-s) if and only if there exists an (n+k) x (n+k) doubly stochastic extension containing B as a submatrix and k minimal. We also propose a procedure constructing a minimal completion of B, and then express it as a convex combination of partial permutation matrices

    3. Beyond the Nursery Walls

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    Beyond the Nursery Walls One of the benefits of modern medical technology is the ability to learn a great deal about a baby prior to its birth. One of the pieces of data available through prenatal testing that is of greatest interest to many expectant parents is the sex of their child. This in turn has caused gender role designation to begin before a baby breathes its first breath. One of the most popular means of signifying sex designations of infants is by using the familiar pink and blue color dichotomy. From newborn wardrobe items, to nursery decorating motifs, to “gender-reveal” events, these colors are still strongly associated with expectations of gender. This research project will investigate the origins of the “blue for boys, pink for girls” dichotomy, explore the manifestations of this dichotomy in our contemporary society, and to discuss the implications of maintaining strong associations between colors and ideas of sex and gender. Drawing on the disciplines of sociology, psychology, pop culture studies, and history, this research will delve into the influences of United States culture and societal norms on the “genderization” of pink and blue. The implication of colors designating gender has been a topic of sociological analysis. However, the lasting impacts on how these gendered colors affect gender identity has not. Through content analysis of text and images in mainstream publications, this paper seeks to illuminate the social construction of gendered colors, and how this construction affects aspects of an individual’s life beyond the color of their nursery walls

    18. Feeding Selectivity of Tetrahymena pyriformis with the Use of Charged Latex Beads

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    Tetrahymena pyriformis is a single-cellular alveolate that uses cilia to filter-feed on small particles. The fact that T. pyriformis ingests non-nutritive material, such as latex beads and carbon particles, along with nutritional ones, led to the hypothesis that the organism feeds non-selectively. One recent article, however, calls this hypothesis into question. We sought to investigate feeding preference in Tetrahymena by determining its rate of phagocytosis on three types of 3 mm polystyrene beads, each at two concentrations. Beads had either a neutral surface, one that was negatively-charged through carboxylation, or a positively-charged, aminated surface. To determine feeding rate, we mixed one type of bead with Tetrahymena and made slides from that mixture at three time points. Since beads accumulate in T. pyriformis over time, the slope of the best-fit line provides a measure of feeding rate. Thirty such measures were obtained for each type of bead and concentration. ANOVA revealed that both bead-type and concentration had significant effects on feeding rate, but there was no hint of an interaction. Tetrahymena fed 54% more rapidly on positively-charged beads than on the ones that were negatively charged. The rate of feeding on neutral beads fell in between the other two. Our study provides new evidence that Tetrahymena feeds selectively. Since surface charge plays a role, electrostatic interactions, as often occur when receptors bind ligands, appear to underlie that selectivity
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