1,328 research outputs found

    Short-Course Chemotherapy for Tuberculosis

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    Annotated and edite transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 February 2004. Introduction by Dr Linda Bryder, University of Auckland.First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2005. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2005. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edite transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 February 2004. Introduction by Dr Linda Bryder, University of Auckland.Annotated and edite transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 February 2004. Introduction by Dr Linda Bryder, University of Auckland.Annotated and edite transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 February 2004. Introduction by Dr Linda Bryder, University of Auckland.Annotated and edite transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 February 2004. Introduction by Dr Linda Bryder, University of Auckland.Annotated and edite transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 February 2004. Introduction by Dr Linda Bryder, University of Auckland.Annotated and edite transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 February 2004. Introduction by Dr Linda Bryder, University of Auckland.The introduction in 1952 of isoniazid established the standard treatment of streptomycin, isoniazid and either thiacetazone or para-aminosalicylic acid for pulmonary tuberculosis. To achieve good results, patients had to take treatment for 18 or even 24 months under supervision. By 1970 a move towards short-course chemotherapy was made, in part due to experimental work in mice at the Pasteur Institute (Paris) and in part to experiments in Professor Denny Mitchison's unit at the Hammersmith Hospital, along with the advent of rifampicin and reappraisal of pyrazinamide. Finally, a series of large controlled clinical trials were carried out by the MRC in East and Central Africa, India, Singapore, Hong Kong and elsewhere. The trials showed that a remarkable and quite unpredictable simplification of treatment could be made with a cost-benefit of major importance. Chaired by Dr David Girling this Witness Seminar brought together a group of experts who were involved in some of the major developments in the treatment of tuberculosis and included: Dr Joseph Angel, Dr Ian Campbell, Sir Iain Chalmers, Dr Kenneth Citron, Sir John Crofton, Professor Janet Darbyshire, Professor Alan Glynn, Dr Tony Jenkins, Dr Amina Jindani, Dr Jeanette Meadway, Professor Dennis Mitchison, Dr John Moore-Gillon, Professor Andrew Nunn, Professor Peter Ormerod and Dr Knut Øvreberg. Mrs Gaye Fox attended on behalf of Professor Wallace Fox. Christie D A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2005) Short-course chemotherapy for tuberculosis, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 24. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London is funded by the Wellcome Trust,which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Maternal Care

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    This is the edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine, London, on 6 June 2000. First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2001.©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2001. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 June 2000. Introduction by Dr Hilary Marland, University of Warwick.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 June 2000. Introduction by Dr Hilary Marland, University of Warwick.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 June 2000. Introduction by Dr Hilary Marland, University of Warwick.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 June 2000. Introduction by Dr Hilary Marland, University of Warwick.In June 2000 a distinguished group of obstetricians, midwives, general practitioners, and medical statisticians came together to discuss maternal care. Chaired by Professor James Drife from Leeds, discussion ranged over many topics, including: the changing role of the obstetrician, general practitioners, and the increasing status and responsibility of midwives. Other subjects include the induction of labour, obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia, and debates about the place and kind of delivery that women wanted. Among those who attended and contributed were: Ms Beverley Beech, Dr Michael Bull, Sir Iain Chalmers, Professor Geoffrey Chamberlain, Ms Mary Cronk, Professor Peter Dunn, Ms Chloe Fisher, Mrs Caroline Flint, Ms Rosemary Jenkins, Dr Irvine Loudon, Professor Alison Macfarlane, Professor Lesley Page, Mr Roger Peel, Mr Elliot Philipp, Mrs Wendy Savage, Mrs Vicky Tinsley, Dame Margaret Wheeler and Professor Charles Whitfield. Christie D A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2001) Maternal care, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 12. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Looking at the Unborn: Historical aspects of obstetric ultrasound

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    Edited trascript of a Witness Seminar held at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine,in London, on 10 March 1998. First published by the Wellcome Trust, 2000. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2000. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 10 March 1998. Introduction by E M Tansey.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 10 March 1998. Introduction by E M Tansey.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 10 March 1998. Introduction by E M Tansey.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 10 March 1998. Introduction by E M Tansey.The obstetric ultrasound scanner had its major origins in a programme of research undertaken in Glasgow in the 1950s and 1960s, under the leadership of the obstetrician, Professor Ian Donald. Donald’s work was characterized by a remarkable series of collaborations between engineers and clinicians, many of whom took part in this Witness Seminar to consider the early history of ultrasound imaging, its technical development and significant clinical applications in the diagnosis of fetal abnormalities. Technical and engineering developments of the scanner were discussed and it was practical demonstrations of the early scanners that gradually convinced the majority of obstetricians to invest time and training in this new technology. Participants include: Mr Usama Abdulla, Mr Thomas Brown, Professor Dugald Cameron, Professor Stuart Campbell, Mr John Fleming, Professor John MacVicar, Professor Peter Wells and Dr James Willocks. Tansey E M, Christie D A. (eds) (2000) Looking at the unborn: Historical aspects of obstetric ultrasound, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 5. London: The Wellcome Trust.The Wellcome Trust is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Intestinal Absorption

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    This is the edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine,in London, on 9 February 1999. First published by the Wellcome Trust, 2000. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2000.All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edtied transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 9 February 1999. Introduction by Sir Christopher Booth.Annotated and edtied transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 9 February 1999. Introduction by Sir Christopher Booth.Annotated and edtied transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 9 February 1999. Introduction by Sir Christopher Booth.Annotated and edtied transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 9 February 1999. Introduction by Sir Christopher Booth.A record of a meeting chaired by Lord Turnberg that brought together those from laboratory research and medical practice to discuss some of the key aspects of intestinal absorption, including work on basic physiological mechanisms and techniques, such as the discovery of dedicated transport systems and their localization, and their clinical impact in intestinal disorders and oral rehydration therapy. Participants include: Sir Christopher Booth, Dr Richard Boyd, Professor Ramsey Bronk, Professor Hermon Dowling, Professor Michael Gardner, Dr Michael Hellier, Dr Roy Levin, Professor Richard Naftalin, Professor Timothy Peters, Professor John Walker-Smith and Professor Oliver Wrong. Christie D A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2000) Intestinal absorption, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 8. London: The Wellcome Trust.The Wellcome Trust is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Environmental Toxicology: The legacy of Silent Spring

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    The transcript of a Witness Seminar held by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, London, London, on 12 March 2002. First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2004.©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2004.All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 March 2002. Introduction by Dr John Clark, St Andrews.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 March 2002. Introduction by Dr John Clark, St Andrews.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 March 2002. Introduction by Dr John Clark, St Andrews.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 March 2002. Introduction by Dr John Clark, St Andrews.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 March 2002. Introduction by Dr John Clark, St Andrews.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 March 2002. Introduction by Dr John Clark, St Andrews.The period immediately following the Second World War brought great hopes of continuing benefits from widespread use of organo-chlorine and organophosphorus insecticides and other pesticides whilst the health risks of pre-war and other later practices were largely ignored. Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) coincided with the adoption of a more cautious approach to the use of pesticides, and the ensuing decades have been characterized by continued identification of both natural and man-made hazards and consequent efforts to minimize risk. ‘Environmental toxicology’ has no firm boundaries, encompassing as it does such diverse areas as the health risks of passive smoking, asbestos, lead, radon, air-borne particles, and accidental release of toxic chemicals (‘chemical incidents’), some of which still await resolution. Chaired by Professor Tony Dayan, this Witness Seminar brought together many of those who helped shape understanding in this area – 40 years after the publication of Silent Spring. Christie D A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2004) Environmental toxicology: The legacy of Silent Spring, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 19. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL. ISBN 978 085484 0915The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Cystic Fibrosis

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    First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2004. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2004. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.In the 1930s, when cystic fibrosis (CF) was first clearly recognised, it was a disorder that inevitably led to death in early childhood from respiratory failure and malnutrition. Since that time, antibiotic treatment and improving nutrition have brought increasing hope to sufferers from the disorder, so that increasing numbers of children have lived on into adult life. Chaired by Professor John Walker-Smith, and attended by a group of leading experts in field at the time, this transcript discusses the history and development of treatment as a result of the establishment of multidisciplinary teams working at special CF centres. Participants also discussed the role of the Cystic Fibrosis Trust and the identification in 1989 of the defective gene, which made antenatal diagnosis possible and suggests that gene therapy might become feasible in the future. Christie D A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2004) Cystic fibrosis, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 20. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London is funded by the Wellcome Trust,which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Development of Physics Applied to Medicine in the UK, 1945–90

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    Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 5 July 2005. Introduction by Dr Jeff Hughes.First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2006.©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2006.All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 5 July 2005. Introduction by Dr Jeff Hughes.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 5 July 2005. Introduction by Dr Jeff Hughes.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 5 July 2005. Introduction by Dr Jeff Hughes.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 5 July 2005. Introduction by Dr Jeff Hughes.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 5 July 2005. Introduction by Dr Jeff Hughes.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 5 July 2005. Introduction by Dr Jeff Hughes.Organized with the assistance of Professor John Clifton (UCL) and chaired by Professor Peter Williams (Manchester), this seminar examined the early developments of medical physics in the UK between 1945 and 1990. Participants discussed a range of themes including medical physics before and during the war, the role of the King's Fund and the formation of the Hospital Physicists' Association (HPA), expansion of medical physics outside radiotherapy and to non-radiation physics (ultrasound, medical instrumentation, bioengineering, use of digital computers), developing regional services and links with industry. The seminar finished with a discussion on the changing scene in the 1980s, covering topics such as funding, academic and undergraduate medical physics, imaging, CT, NMR and others. Participants included Mr Tom Ashton, Dr Barry Barber, Professors Roland Blackwell and Terence Burlin, Dr Joseph Blau, Mr Bob (John) Burns, Professors John Clifton, David Delpy, Philip Dendy and Jack Fowler, Dr Jean Guy, Mr John Haggith, Drs John Haybittle, Alan Jennings and John Law, Professors John Mallard and Joe McKie, Mr David Murnaghan, Professor Angela Newing, Dr Sydney Osborn, Professor Rodney Smallwood, Dr Adrian Thomas, Dr Peter Tothill, Mr Theodore Tulley, Professors Peter Wells and John West, and Mr John Wilkinson. Christie D A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2006) Development of physics applied to medicine in the UK, 1945–90, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 28. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    The Discovery, Use and Impact of Platinum Salts as Chemotherapy Agents for Cancer

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    Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 4 April 2006. Introduction by Professor Matti Aapro, Grenolier, Switzerland.First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2007.©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2007. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 4 April 2006. Introduction by Professor Matti Aapro, Grenolier, Switzerland.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 4 April 2006. Introduction by Professor Matti Aapro, Grenolier, Switzerland.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 4 April 2006. Introduction by Professor Matti Aapro, Grenolier, Switzerland.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 4 April 2006. Introduction by Professor Matti Aapro, Grenolier, Switzerland.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 4 April 2006. Introduction by Professor Matti Aapro, Grenolier, Switzerland.Proposed by Dr Mark Walport (Wellcome Trust) this Seminar examined the discovery, use and impact of platinum salts as chemotherapy agents for cancer. Organized with the assistance of Professor Paul Andrews (St George's Hospital Medical School) and Dr Tony Woods (Wellcome Trust) and chaired by Professor Sir Kenneth Calman (Durham) the Seminar discussed the serendipitous emergence of platinum salts as widely used anticancer agents from a chance observation in a microbiology laboratory; through their use especially for the treatment of previously untreatable solid tumours such as those of the testes and ovary; and their significance in the development of antiemetic agents for chemotherapy patients. Participants included chemists, oncologists, and academic and industrial pharmacologists who devised, in particular, the 5HT3 receptor antagonists. Participants included: Professor Kenneth Bagshawe, Dr Penelope Brock, Professor Hilary Calvert, Professor David Grahame-Smith, Professor Richard Gralla, Professor Kenneth Harrap, Dr James Hoeschele, Professor Ian Judson, Mr Wesley Miner, Professor Robert Naylor, Mrs Brenda Reynolds, Dr John Rudd, Dr Gareth Sanger, Dr David Tattersall, Professor Andrew Thomson, Professor Robert Williams and Dr Eve Wiltshaw. Christie D A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2007) The discovery, use and impact of platinum salts as chemotherapy agents for cancer, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 30. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Public Health in the 1980s and 1990s: Decline and rise?

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    Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 October 2004. Introduction by Professor Virginia Berridge, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2006.©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2006.All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 October 2004. Introduction by Professor Virginia Berridge, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 October 2004. Introduction by Professor Virginia Berridge, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 October 2004. Introduction by Professor Virginia Berridge, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 October 2004. Introduction by Professor Virginia Berridge, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 October 2004. Introduction by Professor Virginia Berridge, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 12 October 2004. Introduction by Professor Virginia Berridge, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.The 1974 reorganization of the National Health Service was largely seen as a disaster for the public health profession. The post of Medical Officer of Health, with its links to local government, was replaced by the community physician, located within health services. The technician-manager rather than the activist role predominated: community medicine doctors carried little weight by comparison with their clinical colleagues. Chaired by Professor Virginia Berridge this Witness Seminar examined the decline and rise of 'public health' both nationally and internationally in the 1980s and 1990s: the impact of the 1988 Acheson Report on public health medicine on a demoralized profession; the role of new ideas about health promotion imported from the international scene; the rise of evidence-based medicine and health services research, and their impact on public health; and the movement for multidisciplinary public health (MDPH) as a new avenue for public health from the 1990s. Participants included Professor Sir Donald Acheson, Professor John Ashton, Professor Nick Black, Professor David Blane, Dr Tim Carter, Sir Iain Chalmers, Dr Aileen Clarke, Dr June Crown, Dr Jeff French, Professor Alan Glynn, Ms Shirley Goodwin, Professor Rod Griffiths, Professor Walter Holland, Professor Klim McPherson, Dr Ornella Moscucci, Dr Geoffrey Rivett, Professor Alwyn Smith and Professor Ann Taket. Berridge V, Christie D A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2006) Public health in the 1980s and 1990s: Decline and rise? Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 26. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine: Volume 2

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    Annotated and edited transcripts of 4 Witness Seminars. Introduction by E M Tansey. First published by the Wellcome Trust, 1998 Occasional Publication no. 6, 1998. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 1998.All volumes are freely available online following the links to Publications/Wellcome Witnesses at www.ucl.ac.uk/histmed.Annotated and edited transcripts of 4 Witness Seminars. Introduction by E M Tansey.Annotated and edited transcripts of 4 Witness Seminars. Introduction by E M Tansey.Annotated and edited transcripts of 4 Witness Seminars. Introduction by E M Tansey.Annotated and edited transcripts of 4 Witness Seminars. Introduction by E M Tansey.Annotated and edited transcripts of 4 Witness Seminars. Introduction by E M Tansey.Annotated and edited transcripts of 4 Witness Seminars. Introduction by E M Tansey.Second volume of four Witness Seminar transcripts of meetings held between 1996 and 1997: ‘Making the Human Body Transparent: The Impact of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging’ (Tansey E M, Christie D A, eds); ‘Research in General Practice’ (Tansey E M, Reynolds L A, eds); ‘Drugs in Psychiatric Practice’ (Tansey E M, Christie D A, eds); ‘The MRC Common Cold Unit (Tansey E M, Reynolds L A, eds). Tansey E M, Christie D A, Reynolds L A. (eds) (1998) Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine: Volume 2. London: The Wellcome Trust.The Wellcome Trust is a registered charity, no. 210183
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