1,969 research outputs found

    Potential to Discover Inclusive Supersymmetry using the CMS Detector

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    Generic signatures of supersymmetry with R-parity conservation include energetic jets and missing transverse energy accompanied with leptons. The ability of CMS to discover supersymmetry with these signals is estimated for 1 fb^-1 of data collected. The selection criteria are optimized and the corresponding systematic effects studied for a single low-mass benchmark point of the Constrained MSSM with m_0 = 60 GeV/c^2, m_1/2 = 250 GeV/c^2, tan beta = 10, A_0 = 0 and mu > 0

    Reconstructing Jets and Missing Transverse Energy using the CMS Detector

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    In 2007, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will circulate and collide proton-proton beams for the first time. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of four experiments at the LHC and is entering the final phases of construction and initial phases of commissioning. This report discusses the expected performance of reconstructing jets and missing transverse energy using the CMS Detector. In addition, strategies for calibrating the energy scale using real data are presented

    Hyper (In)visibility: Trans-ing the Politics of Visibility

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    This project responds to an ongoing demand by the LGBTQ+ activist community to center the “on-the-ground” work of queer artists and activists of color in academic theoretical and political work. More specifically, I respond to this call by considering how the work of Alok Vaid-Menon and Travis Alabanza, trans-femme of color activists and artists, interrogates and contests mainstream visibility-based political praxis alongside canonical works of Black feminist thought, postcolonial theory, queer theory and critical race theory. I compile and analyze three archives of data in taking on this project: academic work on the politics of visibility since the liberation movements of the 1960s, public documents - such as online web pages, social media posts, and press releases - reflecting the political thought and praxis of mainstream progressive organizations since 2009, then works of Black and brown trans-femme artists and activists Alok Vaid-Menon and Travis Alabanza. By examining the relationships between these archives, I articulate in a historically and theoretically rigorous way the challenge posed by trans-femmes of the dominant political paradigm of visibility-as-justice, finding additionally how this challenge stands in relation to the recent history of institutionalized academic work on visibility

    Job Monitoring in an Interactive Grid Analysis Environment

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    The grid is emerging as a great computational resource but its dynamic behavior makes the Grid environment unpredictable. Systems and networks can fail, and the introduction of more users can result in resource starvation. Once a job has been submitted for execution on the grid, monitoring becomes essential for a user to see that the job is completed in an efficient way, and to detect any problems that occur while the job is running. In current environments once a user submits a job he loses direct control over the job and the system behaves like a batch system: the user submits the job and later gets a result back. The only information a user can obtain about a job is whether it is scheduled, running, cancelled or finished. Today users are becoming increasingly interested in such analysis grid environments in which they can check the progress of the job, obtain intermediate results, terminate the job based on the progress of job or intermediate results, steer the job to other nodes to achieve better performance and check the resources consumed by the job. In order to fulfill their requirements of interactivity a mechanism is needed that can provide the user with real time access to information about different attributes of a job. In this paper we present the design of a Job Monitoring Service, a web service that will provide interactive remote job monitoring by allowing users to access different attributes of a job once it has been submitted to the interactive Grid Analysis Environment

    Job Interactivity Using a Steering Service in an Interactive Grid Analysis Environment

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    Grid computing has been dominated by the execution of batch jobs. Interactive data analysis is a new domain in the area of grid job execution. The Grid-Enabled Analysis Environment (GAE) attempts to address this in HEP grids by the use of a Steering Service. This service will provide physicists with the continuous feedback of their jobs and will provide them with the ability to control and steer the execution of their submitted jobs. It will enable them to move their jobs to different grid nodes when desired. The Steering Service will also act autonomously to make steering decisions on behalf of the user, attempting to optimize the execution of the job. This service will also ensure the optimal consumption of the Grid user's resource quota. The Steering Service will provide a web service interface defined by standard WSDL. In this paper we have discussed how the Steering Service will facilitate interactive remote analysis of data generated in Interactive Grid Analysis Environment

    The Ultralight project: the network as an integrated and managed resource for data-intensive science

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    Looks at the UltraLight project which treats the network interconnecting globally distributed data sets as a dynamic, configurable, and closely monitored resource to construct a next-generation system that can meet the high-energy physics community's data-processing, distribution, access, and analysis needs

    The Motivation, Architecture and Demonstration of Ultralight Network Testbed

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    In this paper we describe progress in the NSF-funded Ultralight project and a recent demonstration of Ultralight technologies at SuperComputing 2005 (SC|05). The goal of the Ultralight project is to help meet the data-intensive computing challenges of the next generation of particle physics experiments with a comprehensive, network-focused approach. Ultralight adopts a new approach to networking: instead of treating it traditionally, as a static, unchanging and unmanaged set of inter-computer links, we are developing and using it as a dynamic, configurable, and closely monitored resource that is managed from end-to-end. Thus we are constructing a next-generation global system that is able to meet the data processing, distribution, access and analysis needs of the particle physics community. In this paper we present the motivation for, and an overview of, the Ultralight project. We then cover early results in the various working areas of the project. The remainder of the paper describes our experiences of the Ultralight network architecture, kernel setup, application tuning and configuration used during the bandwidth challenge event at SC|05. During this Challenge, we achieved a record-breaking aggregate data rate in excess of 150 Gbps while moving physics datasets between many sites interconnected by the Ultralight backbone network. The exercise highlighted the benefits of Ultralight's research and development efforts that are enabling new and advanced methods of distributed scientific data analysis

    The Design and Demonstration of the Ultralight Testbed

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    In this paper we present the motivation, the design, and a recent demonstration of the UltraLight testbed at SC|05. The goal of the Ultralight testbed is to help meet the data-intensive computing challenges of the next generation of particle physics experiments with a comprehensive, network- focused approach. UltraLight adopts a new approach to networking: instead of treating it traditionally, as a static, unchanging and unmanaged set of inter-computer links, we are developing and using it as a dynamic, configurable, and closely monitored resource that is managed from end-to-end. To achieve its goal we are constructing a next-generation global system that is able to meet the data processing, distribution, access and analysis needs of the particle physics community. In this paper we will first present early results in the various working areas of the project. We then describe our experiences of the network architecture, kernel setup, application tuning and configuration used during the bandwidth challenge event at SC|05. During this Challenge, we achieved a record-breaking aggregate data rate in excess of 150 Gbps while moving physics datasets between many Grid computing sites
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