34 research outputs found

    Modeling of GERDA Phase II data

    Get PDF
    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) of INFN is searching for neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ0\nu\beta\beta) decay of 76^{76}Ge. The technological challenge of GERDA is to operate in a "background-free" regime in the region of interest (ROI) after analysis cuts for the full 100\,kg\cdotyr target exposure of the experiment. A careful modeling and decomposition of the full-range energy spectrum is essential to predict the shape and composition of events in the ROI around QββQ_{\beta\beta} for the 0νββ0\nu\beta\beta search, to extract a precise measurement of the half-life of the double-beta decay mode with neutrinos (2νββ2\nu\beta\beta) and in order to identify the location of residual impurities. The latter will permit future experiments to build strategies in order to further lower the background and achieve even better sensitivities. In this article the background decomposition prior to analysis cuts is presented for GERDA Phase II. The background model fit yields a flat spectrum in the ROI with a background index (BI) of 16.040.85+0.7810316.04^{+0.78}_{-0.85} \cdot 10^{-3}\,cts/(kg\cdotkeV\cdotyr) for the enriched BEGe data set and 14.680.52+0.4710314.68^{+0.47}_{-0.52} \cdot 10^{-3}\,cts/(kg\cdotkeV\cdotyr) for the enriched coaxial data set. These values are similar to the one of Gerda Phase I despite a much larger number of detectors and hence radioactive hardware components

    Modeling of GERDA Phase II data

    Get PDF
    The GERmanium Detector Array (Gerda) experiment at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) of INFN is searching for neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. The technological challenge of Gerda is to operate in a “background-free” regime in the region of interest (ROI) after analysis cuts for the full 100 kg·yr target exposure of the experiment. A careful modeling and decomposition of the full-range energy spectrum is essential to predict the shape and composition of events in the ROI around Qββ for the 0νββ search, to extract a precise measurement of the half-life of the double-beta decay mode with neutrinos (2νββ) and in order to identify the location of residual impurities. The latter will permit future experiments to build strategies in order to further lower the background and achieve even better sensitivities. In this article the background decomposition prior to analysis cuts is presented for Gerda Phase II. The background model fit yields a flat spectrum in the ROI with a background index (BI) of 16.04+0.78−0.85⋅10−3 cts/(keV·kg·yr) for the enriched BEGe data set and 14.68+0.47−0.52⋅10−3 cts/(keV·kg·yr) for the enriched coaxial data set. These values are similar to the one of Phase I despite a much larger number of detectors and hence radioactive hardware components

    GERDA and LEGEND: Probing the Neutrino Nature and Mass at 100 meV and beyond

    No full text
    The Gerda (GERmanium Detector Array) project, located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), was started in 2005, a few years after the claim of evidence for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of 76Ge to the ground state of 76Se: it is an ultra-rare process whose detection would directly establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino and provide a measurement of its mass and mass hierarchy. The aim of Gerda was to confirm or disprove the claim by an increased sensitivity experiment. After establishing the new technology of Ge detectors operated bare in liquid Argon and since 2011, Gerda efficiently collected data searching for 0νββ of 76Ge, first deploying the 76Ge-enriched detectors from two former experiments and later new detectors with enhanced signal-to-background rejection, produced from freshly 76Ge-enriched material. Since then, the Gerda setup has been upgraded twice, first in 2013–2015 and later in 2018. The period before 2013 is Phase I and that after 2015 is Phase II. Both the Gerda setup and the analysis tools evolved along the project lifetime, allowing to achieve the remarkable average energy resolution of ∼3.6 and ∼2.6 keV for Coaxial Germanium (Coax) detectors and for Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe), respectively, and the background index of 5.2−1.3+1.6 · 10−4 cts/(keV·kg·yr) in a 230 keV net range centered at Qββ. No evidence of the 0νββ decay at Qββ = 2039.1 keV has been found, hence the limit of 1.8·1026 yr on the half-life (T1/20ν) at 90% C.L. was set with the exposure of 127.2 kg·yr. The corresponding limit range for the effective Majorana neutrino mass mee has been set to 79–180 meV. The Gerda performances in terms of background index, energy resolution and exposure are the best achieved so far by 76Ge double beta decay experiments. In Phase II, Gerda succeeded in operating in a background free regime and set a world record. In 2017, the Legend Collaboration was born from the merging of the Gerda and Majorana Collaborations and resources with the aim to further improve the Gerda sensitivity. First, the Legend200 project, with a mass of up to 200 kg of 76Ge-enriched detectors, aims to further improve the background index down to <0.6 · 10−3 cts/(keV·kg·yr) to explore the Inverted Hierarchy region of the neutrino mass ordering, then the Legend1000 (1 ton of 76Ge-enriched) will probe the Normal Hierarchy. In this paper, we describe the Gerda experiment, its evolution, the data analysis flow, a selection of its results and technological achievements, and finally the design, features and challenges of Legend, the Gerda prosecutor

    Highlights from GERDA: Probing the Majorana Neutrino Mass at 100 meV

    No full text
    Since 2010, the Gerda experiment at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) operates searching for neutrinoless double beta decay ( 0 ν β β ) of 76 Ge to the ground and excited states of 76 Se. 0 ν β β is an ultra-rare process whose detection would directly establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino and provide a direct measurement of its mass. Since the apparatus upgrade in 2013–2015, the collaboration released the third update of the achieved results at the Neutrino 2018 Conference. The hardware upgrade and the fine tuning of the powerful analysis tools to reconstruct the event energy and to discriminate the background allowed the achievement of the energy resolution of 3 keV and 3.6 keV for Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) and Coaxial Germanium (Coax) detectors, respectively, and an unprecedented low background index of 0.6 · 10 - 3 cts/(keV·kg·yr) 10 - 3 cts/(keV·kg·yr) in a 230 keV netto range centered at Q β β in the exposure of 58.93 kg·yr. No evidence of the 0 ν β β decay is found at the Q β β = 2039.1 keV, and the limit of 0.9 · 10 26 yr on the half-life ( T 1 / 2 0 ν ) at 90% C.L. is set. This corresponds to the limit range for the effective Majorana neutrino mass m e e of 110–260 meV. The Gerda sensitivity in terms of background index, energy resolution and exposure is the best achieved so far in 76 Ge double beta decay experiments, the energy resolution and background in the Region Of Interest (ROI) allow Gerda to operate in a background-free regime and to set a world record

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume I Introduction to DUNE

    No full text
    International audienceThe preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay—these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. This TDR is intended to justify the technical choices for the far detector that flow down from the high-level physics goals through requirements at all levels of the Project. Volume I contains an executive summary that introduces the DUNE science program, the far detector and the strategy for its modular designs, and the organization and management of the Project. The remainder of Volume I provides more detail on the science program that drives the choice of detector technologies and on the technologies themselves. It also introduces the designs for the DUNE near detector and the DUNE computing model, for which DUNE is planning design reports. Volume II of this TDR describes DUNE's physics program in detail. Volume III describes the technical coordination required for the far detector design, construction, installation, and integration, and its organizational structure. Volume IV describes the single-phase far detector technology. A planned Volume V will describe the dual-phase technology
    corecore