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    Justice Data Base Directory

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    The Justice Data Base Directory was originally published in 1988 with an introduction, 8 chapters describing Alaska justice agencies and their data holdings, and an index. It was published in looseleaf notebook format for easy updating. Four updates were published in 1989–1992, each update consisting of additional chapters, revised table of contents and index, and updates to existing pages to reflect changes such as agency addresses. Five chapters were added in 1989; five in 1990; four in 1991; and five in 1992, for a total of 27 agencies covered by the Justice Data Base Directory in its final form. For archival purposes, this record includes all five versions of the directory. The 1992 edition is the most complete.The Justice Data Base Directory, first published in 1988 with new chapters added annually through 1992, presents information about the primary databases maintained by Alaska justice agencies and the procedures to be followed for access to the data. Its availability should substantially reduce the work required to identify the sources of data for research and policy development in law, law enforcement, courts, and corrections. The 1992 update to the directory adds five chapters, for a total of 27 Alaska agencies whose justice-related data holdings are described: Alaska Court System; Alaska Judicial Council; Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct; Alaska Department of Law; Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) and three agencies under DPS: Alaska Police Standards Council, Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (CDSA), and Violent Crimes Compensation Board; Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) and Parole Board; four agencies of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services β€” Bureau of Vital Statistics (Division of Public Health), Epidemiology Section (Division of Public Health), Division of Family and Youth Services, and Office of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse; Alaska Public Defender Agency; Office of Public Advocacy (OPA); Alaska Bar Association; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit; Alaska Office of Equal Employment Opportunity (Office of the Governor); Alaska Office of the Ombudsman; Alaska Legal Services Corporation; Alaska Public Offices Commission; Alaska State Commission for Human Rights; Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board; Legislative Research Agency; Legislative Affairs Agency; State Archives and Records Management Services (Alaska Department of Education). Fully indexed.Funded in part by a grant from the Bureau of Justice Statistics.1. Introduction / 2. Alaska Court System / 3. Alaska Department of Law / 4. Alaska Department of Public Safety / 5. Alaska Department of Corrections / 6. Division of Family and Youth Services, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services / 7. Alaska Bar Association / 8. Alaska Judicial Council / 9. Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit / 10. Bureau of Vital Statistics, Division of Public Health, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services / 11. Alaska Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, Office of the Governor / 12. Office of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services / 13. Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Alaska Department of Public Safety / 14. Epidemiology Section, Division of Public Health, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services / 15. Violent Crimes Compensation Board, Alaska Department of Public Safety / 16. Alaska Police Standards Council, Alaska Department of Public Safety / 17. Alcoholic Beverage Control Board / 18. Alaska Office of the Ombudsman / 19. State Archives and Records Management Services, Alaska Department of Education / 20. Legislative Research Agency / 21. Legislative Affairs Agency / 22. Alaska State Commission for Human Rights / 23. Parole Board, Alaska Department of Corrections / 24. Alaska Public Offices Commission / 25. Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct / 26. Alaska Legal Services Corporation / 27. Office of Public Advocacy / 28. Alaska Public Defender Agency / 29. Inde

    Modelling mortality rates using GEE models

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    Generalised estimating equation (GEE) models are extensions of generalised linear models by relaxing the assumption of independence. These models are appropriate to analyze correlated longitudinal responses which follow any distribution that is a member of the exponential family. This model is used to relate daily mortality rate of Maltese adults aged 65 years and over with a number of predictors, including apparent temperature, season and year. To accommodate the right skewed mortality rate distribution a Gamma distribution is assumed. An identity link function is used for ease of interpretating the parameter estimates. An autoregressive correlation structure of order 1 is used since correlations decrease as distance between observations increases. The study shows that mortality rate and temperature are related by a quadratic function. Moreover, the GEE model identifies a number of significant main and interaction effects which shed light on the effect of weather predictors on daily mortality rates.peer-reviewe

    Session Law 84-190

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    Session Law 78-198

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