13,550 research outputs found

    FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT REFORM PROCESS IN THE INDONESIAN VILLAGE GOVERNMENT

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    Purpose: The study aimed to examine contingency factors influencing the village reform especially the financial management process. Methodology: Primary data was obtained through interviews, while the supporting data was gathered from an examination of Indonesian government documents, organizational reports, and academic literature. Result: The present study found that the primary motive for FMS Reform in the Indonesian village government was the need that was expressed by the Indonesian Ministry of Home Affairs (MoHA) as a regulator of Indonesian village government for modernizing the village financial management and reporting system. Applications: This research can be used for the universities, teachers, and students. Novelty/Originality: The first FMS reform was marked by the enactment of Indonesian Government Regulation (GR/PP) 72/2005 on 'Village' followed by the MoHA regulation on the 'guidance of financial management system'. These regulations were denoted as a reform from the old village administration system regime to the new village financial management system

    The Politics of Development Policy and Development Policy Reform in New Order Indonesia

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    How can we account for Indonesia’s astonishing development performance between 1965 and 1997—rapid growth, massive reduction in the incidence of poverty, low income-inequality and substantial diversification of the economy—in the face of extremely dirigiste microeconomic policies, even by developing country standards, and massive, systemic and endemic rent-seeking and corruption? This question is answered by demonstrating that Suharto, the leader of Indonesia’s New Order government, was extremely successful in building and sustaining a procapitalist, pro-integration with the world economy, and pro-growth with equity political coalition in which corruption played a central role.http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/40018/3/wp632.pd

    Improving Indonesia's Forest and Land Governance: Using a Delphi Approach to Identify Efficacious Interventions

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    It is now recognized that addressing deforestation and forest and peatlands degradation and destruction in Indonesia requires improvements to land and forest governance. It is also accepted that further research is required into this large field of study and practice. In particular needs have been identified for better links between theory and practice, and between academic analysis and work in the field. To respond to this gap, this study investigates the underlying drivers of deforestation, and forest and peatlands degradation and destruction (herein called deforestation and peatlands degradation) with the intention of identifying interventions that will improve land and forest governance in Indonesia. Through a Delphi process, a panel of experts on forest and land governance identified three main drivers of deforestation and peatlands degradation. These were: (1) unclear land tenure and uncertain land classification (agreed by 88% of respondents); (2) business and political interests that influence policy-making and regulations (70% agreement) and (3) ineffective land use planning (53% agreement). In response, the panel recommended three priority governance interventions relating to the following issues: (1) increasing the capacity of local communities to manage and monitor forests and natural resources (65% agreement); (2) gazetting forests to clarify land boundaries and determine which areas should be village, community and state forest zone (58% agreement); (3) integrating participatory maps into spatial plans to protect local communities and indigenous peoples' development needs (53% agreement). A research theme with the highest agreement was the following: action research involving the government, private sector and community (64% agreement). This study finds that there is strong support for community level approaches to forest management. Securing community forest tenure through clarifying land claims and integrating local land tenure into spatial planning is a key step to achieving sustainable forest management. The concluding recommendations suggest that the most efficacious interventions to be taken by researchers, government, donors and civil society to improve Indonesia's forest and land governance processes include: Support community institutions; Accelerate forest gazettement using local community institutions to clarify community forest claims; Integrate participatory maps into spatial plans; Support local communities' ability to monitor forests; Conduct action research involving all stakeholders; Address financing of the forest and land sector; Engage political economy analysis

    The bureaucratisation of local government in Indonesia

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    Policy statements on rural development in New Order Indonesia devote considerable attention to engaging the participation of the rural population. To some extent this rhetorical posturing reflects a recognition of the central government's real dependence on local organisation in the realisation of its political and economic agenda

    Development Through Empowerment: Delivering Effective Public Services - A Literature Review

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    This paper reviews the channels through which empowerment may improve the efficiency and quality of public service delivery, particularly in developing Asia. Departing from a macro perspective, we focus and revisit microeconomic evidence for three broad measures aimed at empowering the poor: empowerment through voice, empowerment through exit, and empowerment through information

    Pro-poor intervention strategies in irrigated agriculture in Asia: poverty in irrigated agriculture: issues and options: Indonesia

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    Irrigated farming / Poverty / Institutional development / Irrigation management / Colonialism / Policy / Privatization / Hydrology / Climate / Cropping systems / Soils / Participatory rural appraisal / Performance indexes / Crop production / Costs / Households / Income / Expenditure / Irrigation systems / Operations / Maintenance / Water users’ associations / Financing / Constraints / Indonesia

    An Agricultural Development Legacy Unrealised by Five Presidents, 1966–2014

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    The founding fathers of the Indonesian Republic, Soekarno and Moh. Hatta, whobecame first President and Vice President respectively, designated the agriculturalsector as the major factor contributing to Indonesia's economic growth. Prof AnneBooth's research findings during the Green Revolution in the mid-1970s also indicatethe importance of the agricultural sector. Food self-sufficiency in the country wasachieved in 1985, when Indonesia was close to its “take-off” stage.However, subsequent developments after the New Order period indicated a gradual shiftof policy guide lines from People's Welfare to Export-driven Growth and IncreasingForeign investment. Five Presidents since Sukarno have neglected the urgency ofagrarian reform in Indonesia

    The Politics of Development Policy and Development Policy Reform in New Order Indonesia

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    How can we account for Indonesia’s astonishing development performance between 1965 and 1997—rapid growth, massive reduction in the incidence of poverty, low income-inequality and substantial diversification of the economy—in the face of extremely dirigiste microeconomic policies, even by developing country standards, and massive, systemic and endemic rent-seeking and corruption? This question is answered by demonstrating that Suharto, the leader of Indonesia’s New Order government, was extremely successful in building and sustaining a procapitalist, pro-integration with the world economy, and pro-growth with equity political coalition in which corruption played a central role.Suharto, New Order, corruption, Indonesia, development policy, economic reform
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