1,024,654 research outputs found

    Art Walk

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    The Collection is comprised of a wide range of donatedart works—paintings, prints and sculpture. Works in The Collection are installed on campus so thatstudents, faculty, staff and visitors encounter original works of art everywhere—in public areas, such as hallways and common rooms, as well as in private offices throughout the University. As a result, art has become apart of the daily lives of everyone at Sacred Heart University. To assist in appreciating a selection of the art displayed on campus, the essay Looking at Contemporary Art is included in this brochure.

    Australia: Nine Contemporary Artists - Redback Graphix

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    Catalogue of an exhibition of Australian artists held in association with the Olympic Arts Festival, Los Angeles, 1 June - 12 August 1984 at the Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art. Section on Redback Graphix, including photographs of Michael Callaghan and Gregor Cullen printing a poster.https://ro.uow.edu.au/hcp/1004/thumbnail.jp

    Center on Contemporary Art: Facility or Facilitator?

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    The Center on Contemporary Art (CoCA) was founded in Seattle in the early 1980s and continues to exhibit contemporary art today in 2019. This case study looks at the organization through the lens of ecology and living systems to discover its place within Seattle’s greater arts ecosystem, focusing specifically on how and why CoCA emerged; how the organization evolved during the 1980s; how the environment shaped the organization and how the organization in turn shaped its environment

    The erotic and contemporary art

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    Lou Andreas Salomé wrote The Erotic (1911) before she met Freud. The recent English translation of her ground-breaking book encourages us to consider how a century of social change has affected erotic behaviour, and what this may mean for psychoanalysis. In a world of online porn, internet dating and ‘digital emotions’, what are the contours of ‘the erotic’ in the world today? This interdisciplinary conference explores the significance of contemporary erotic life for human relationships and the questions it poses for psychoanalytic theory and practice. Speakers were asked to consider a variety of themes: The erotic at different stages of life Differences and similarities between male and female eroticism The difference between ‘erotic’ and ‘sexual’ The new female erotica – what is its appeal? Sexualisation of childhood and 'childhood sexuality' 'Cultural hypocrisy’ and double standards - do they still exist? Pornography – how is it used and what are its effects on individuals and relationships? Internet dating and online affairs – a modern form of infidelity? New technology and the erotic Eroticism and violence Erotic fantasies Erotic transference and counter-transference in psychoanalysis Heterosexual and homosexual erotic – is there a difference? Cross-cultural and inter-cultural perspectives on the erotic Is there such a thing as a ‘post-modern’ erotic? Emma Talbot's presentation focused on representations of the erotic in contemporary art, and was followed by a roundtable discussion

    Invitation

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    invitiation for Senga Nengudi's performance Nature's Way and Maren Hassinger's Blanket of Branches. Note from Senga Nengudi reads:Nature's Way was later changed to the titlel Dance Card

    Poetics, Materialities, Performances: Greek Photographic Books 2000-2023

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    At the dawn of the new century, we are witnessing the renaissance and democratisation of the photographic book in Greece. The exhibition Poetics, Materialities, Performances: Greek Photographic Books 2020-2023 documents this evolution and explores its characteristics. Several factors have influenced this development. The advent of new digital technologies enabled cost-efficient production, self-publishing, and international dissemination. The relatively delayed institutionalisation of photography as an art form on par with painting and sculpture within the Greek art scene, played an equally significant role, resulting in a notable increase in museum publications. Furthermore, as photographic books respond to and reflect diverse pictorial approaches and trends, this curatorial proposition seeks to offer a concise overview of contemporary photographic practices. To this end, the selection is cross-generational and includes books that retrospectively cover a broader context of practice dating back to the 1970s. It encompasses monographs that may focus on a specific topic, publications presenting one or more bodies of work, curated retrospectives of a practitioner’s oeuvre, as well as expanded exhibition publications and self-published books. The books on display present a kaleidoscope of photographic practices, ranging from landscape, street, studio, directorial, and diaristic photography to social documentary, conflict photography, and re-articulations of “the photographic,” which often arise from the intersection of photography with various other media, such as digital media and painting. They also address a wide array of topics: identities, the Greek crisis, history and collective memory, the interplay between nature and culture, communities, societal issues, politics. The title of the exhibition indicates three methodological approaches to the materials. Poetics, that is, the storytelling mechanisms, the editing and sequencing of the photographs, the dialectical juxtaposition of text, images, and graphic design, plays a pivotal role in this exploration. Equally significant are the materiality and objecthood of these publications, including their size and format, the paper thickness and texture, all of which are integral parts of their narrative and haptic experience. Lastly, the exhibition highlights how photographic books perform as visual and textual propositions and as cultural experiences, and examines the impact these performances have on audiences and the histories of Greek photography. The purpose of a book is to be leafed through and read. In line with this principle, the exhibition is designed as an interactive display that invites touch and contemplation. Here, visitors are not passive spectators but active participants whose individuality determines the ways the books are handled and their journey of multiple associations. Artists Costis Antoniadis, Alexandros Avramidis, Manolis Baboussis, Ilias Bourgiotis, Dimitra Dede, John Demos, Nikos Economopoulos, Petros Efstathiadis, Pavlos Fysakis, Aikaterini Gegisian, Alexandros Georgiou, Aris Georgiou, Haris Kakarouhas, Stratos Kalafatis, Katerina Kaloudi, Alexandros Katsis, Demetris Koilalous, Panos Kokkinias, Yannis Kontos, Maria Louka, Natassa Markidou, Nikos Markou, Despina Meimaroglou, Persephone Michou, Katerina Moschou, Lia Nalbantidou, Effie Paleologou, Nikos Panayotopoulos, Yiannis Pantelidis, Roula Patra, Avraam Pavlidis, Paris Petridis, Penelope Petsini, Nikos Pilos, Platon Rivellis, Andreas Schοinas, Panagiotis Sotiropoulos, Spyros Staveris, Yiannis Theodoropoulos, Marinos Tsagkarakis, Dimitris Tsoumplekas, Eirini Vourloumis, Tassos Vrettos, Yorgos Yatromanolakis, Yiorgis Yerolymbos, Zak / Zackie Oh, Lily Zoumpoul

    GSK Contemporary – Aware: Art Fashion Identity

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    The Royal Academy of Arts presented GSK Contemporary 2010, the third season of contemporary art at 6 Burlington Gardens. GSK Contemporary – Aware: Art Fashion Identity focused on how artists and a number of designers examine clothing as a mechanism to communicate and reveal elements of our identity. The exhibition contained work by over 30 international contemporary artists and designers, including some newly commissioned work, and occupied the main galleries of the Royal Academy’s 6 Burlington Gardens building. As assistant curator, Daniela Hatfield assisted in the design and organisation of a series of Salon Conversations to accompany the event. Cake and conversation featured at these salons, where the audience joined practitioners from the realms of art, fashion, sociology, performance, journalism, and fashion image-making to explore themes provoked by ‘Aware’, and to discuss ways in which fashion and art are presented, consumed, understood, respected, or reviled

    Talking about a Christine Borland sculpture: effective empathy in contemporary anatomy art (and an emerging counterpart in medical training?)

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    This Introduction and interview discusses the poetical and empathic insights that are a key to the effectiveness of contemporary artist Christine Borland's practice and its relevance to the medical humanities, visual art research and medical students’ training. It takes place in a context of intensive interest in reciprocity and conversation as well as expert exchange between the fields of Medicine and Contemporary Arts. The interview develops an understanding of medical research and the application of its historical resources and contemporary practice-based research in contemporary art gallery exhibitions. Artists tend not to follow prescriptive programmes towards new historical knowledge, however, a desire to form productive relationships between history and contemporary art practice does reveal practical advantages. Borland's research also includes investigations in anatomy, medical practices and conservatio

    My road to ruin: the studio without walls

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    This paper considers examples of ‘ruin’ in contemporary visual art and examines fracture, fragmentation and provisionality in contemporary installation art practice. Areas of commonality and difference are explored within a critical framework of concepts. The paper contributes towards the creation of a taxonomy of potential source material for the study of ruin in visual art
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