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Avoiding structural collapses in refurbishment - a decision support system (HSE research report)

By CJ Anumba, CO Egbu and M Kashyap
Year: 2006
OAI identifier: oai:irep.ntu.ac.uk:6540

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Citations

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  2. 6187:2000: Code of Practice for Demolition, British Standards Institution. doi
  3. (2000). A Decision Support System for Building Refurbishment Design,’
  4. (2003). A Decision-Making Tool To Support Integration Of Sustainable Technologies
  5. (1994). A guide to the management of building refurbishment.
  6. (2002). Adapting Buildings For Changing Uses, doi
  7. (1993). Appraisal and Repair of Claddings and Fixings, doi
  8. (1978). Approaches for design against progressive collapse, doi
  9. Are any of the floors, beams pulling away and/or appear to have a sag or cracks? No No No No No
  10. (1990). Assessing traditional housing for rehabilitation’.
  11. (2003). Assessment and Inspection of Buildings and other facilities.
  12. (1988). Blackspot Construction: A Study of Five Years of Fatal Accidents in the Building and Civil Engineering Industries, Health and Safety Executive,
  13. (2000). BS 6187 Code of practice for demolition, doi
  14. (2002). Building Adaptation, doi
  15. (2004). Building collapses (Manmade Disasters), BookRags Research Topic Guide, Lucent Books
  16. (2005). Building Design for Abnormal Loads and Progressive doi
  17. (1970). Canadian Structural Design Manual, Supplement No. 4 to the National Building Code of Canada.
  18. (1996). Characteristics and difficulties associated with refurbishment’,
  19. (1996). Characteristics and difficulties associated with refurbishment’, Construction Papers, The Chartered Institute of Building,
  20. (1999). Collapse – doi
  21. (1992). Competitive Tendering for Refurbishment Work’ doi
  22. (1993). Construction Safety Management
  23. damaged or deteriorated structure have strength less than 85% of full strength?
  24. (1998). Database Developer's Guide with doi
  25. (1989). Decision Support Systems - Putting Theory into Practice,
  26. (2000). Development of a FuzzyBased Decision Making Tool for Construction Project Teams’
  27. Do the method statements identify hazards, risks and provide solutions?
  28. Does the Demolition Contractor understand methods of construction and stress patterns?
  29. Does the risk assessments outline sequence, method of dismantling and demolition?
  30. (2000). End User Evaluation of Engineering Knowledge Based Systems’, doi
  31. Engineer assessed the structural stability of the structural members?
  32. (2000). EPIQR and IEQ: Indoor Environment Quality in European Apartment Buildings. Energy and Buildings. Volume 31, Issue 2, doi
  33. (1986). Expert System in Management Science, doi
  34. (1998). Final Report: Process Protocol,
  35. Harrison, P., Appraisal and Repair of Claddings doi
  36. Has the Client ensured that the report of the survey is available and s/he has informed the utility companies? No Yes No No Yes
  37. Has the Contractor ensured the structure is left in a stable condition at all stages of the project? No No No No Yes No 7 Not likely to collapse due to other loadings, such as wind, storm, and vibrations due to traffic and movement of construction plants?
  38. Has the Contractor finalised procedures and plans to hand-over the refurbished project/facility?
  39. Has the Contractor prepared an operation and maintenance plan?
  40. Has the Demolition Contractor knowledge of typical failures and collapse hazards from previous failures and experiences? No No No No Yes
  41. Has the Demolition Contractor prepared an asbestos removal report No No No No Yes
  42. Has the Demolition Contractor prepared the final demolition report No No No No Yes
  43. Has the Designer ensured compliance with statutory approvals?
  44. Has the Designer/Architect prepared drawings from site surveys in case no such drawings are available?
  45. Has the Designer/Architect prepared the needs assessment report for the refurbished facility?
  46. Has the feasibility study identified the scope of refurbishment project?
  47. Has the feedback from the project been used for best practice guidance notes?
  48. (1994). Has the Health and Safety plan handed over to the Client? No No No No No No 12 The major issues are to be included in the health and safety plan for the construction phase which is required under the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations
  49. Has the maintenance plan been prepared for efficient operation of the facility?
  50. Has the Planning Supervisor been involved in the review process of method statements No No No Yes No No 7
  51. Has the Planning Supervisor determined safe site transport arrangements and identified access points, egress routes and rescue procedures and
  52. Has the Planning Supervisor identified safe practices and procedures?
  53. Has the Planning Supervisor prepared a risk mitigation plan?
  54. Has the Project Manager assessed all the site logistics?
  55. Has the Project Manager ensured that inspections to detect hazards and unsafe conditions are carried out on a daily basis or other appropriate levels? No Yes No No No
  56. Has the Project Manager finalised the sequence of works?
  57. Has the Project Manager got the safety plan, method statements, risk assessments and refurbishment plan readily available before the work commences? No Yes No No No
  58. Has the Project Manager identified Health and Safety criteria for the supply chain? No Yes No No No
  59. Has the Project Manager made input to Health and Safety file? No Yes No No No
  60. Has the Project Manager prepared any procurement strategy suitable for refurbishment?
  61. Has the project manager prepared the sequence of refurbishment activities?
  62. Has the Project Manager prepared the snag list and handed this over to the contractor? No Yes No No No
  63. Has the Structural Engineer examined 'as built drawings', structural design and construction details of the existing structure? No No No No No
  64. Has the Structural Engineer examined the structure for any movement in foundations, structural frame and wall panels? No No No No No
  65. Has the Structural Engineer quantified the severity of any damage and geometric location of the damage? No No No No No
  66. Has the Structural Engineer/Designer identified the elements which might be adversely affected during any additions and/or alterations? No No No No No Yes 5
  67. Have all load bearing elements been assessed for load carrying capacity? No No No No No
  68. Have all the affected walls and floors been adequately supported, shored or braced before demolition? No No No No Yes
  69. Have all the work packages been awarded to the most preferred contractors No Yes No No No
  70. Have the designers considered wind load conforming to BS 6399? No No Yes No No No 3 There are evidences where gable walls have collapsed as a result of not conforming to the BS 6399.
  71. Have the gable walls been braced and tied properly?
  72. Have the load paths been identified during the structural appraisal?
  73. Have the vertical load bearing components been strengthened?
  74. Have you conducted the end of project review to produce end-of-project review report?
  75. (2004). Health and Safety in refurbishment involving demolition and structural instability’,
  76. How far has the Client progressed with the appointment of the Designer/Architect? Yes No No No No No 1 The Designer could be the Architect, Engineer or any person who carries out this function in the process.
  77. How far has the Client progressed with the appointment of the Structural Engineer? Yes No No No No
  78. (2005). Index of supplementary safety and enforcement tables to Health and
  79. (1997). Institute, BS 8110: Structural Use of Concrete,
  80. (1996). Institution of Structural Engineers "Appraisal of existing structures", IStructE 2nd Edition,
  81. (2001). Intelligent Pathological Assessment of Housing Subsidence Damage’, Structures and Buildings, doi
  82. Is the existing structure a framed structure?
  83. Is the opening cut into floor extending the full span of the floor between supports? No No No No Yes
  84. Is the Project Manager managing and monitoring the construction work against the job specifications and method statements? No Yes No No No
  85. Is the structural steel being removed column length to column length?
  86. Is there any record/prediction about the remaining service life of the damaged structure?
  87. Is there structural continuity between key structural elements?
  88. (2001). Lee's Building Maintenance Management (Fourth edition),
  89. London.
  90. (1994). Management education and training for refurbishment work within the construction industry.
  91. Manager got safety plan, method statements, risk assessments and refurbishment plan readily available before the work commences? No Yes No No No
  92. of the project respondents ICE Health and Safety Registered? No Yes Yes No Yes Yes 4 The Institution of Civil Engineers has established a health
  93. (1970). Part 9, Housing and Small Buildings.
  94. (1975). Progressive collapse, doi
  95. (1975). Psychological Determinants of bonded rationality: Implications for Decision-Making Strategies, Decision Sciences, doi
  96. (1987). Refurbishment and Modernisation in Code of estimating practice(10), Chartered Institute of Building,
  97. (1996). Refurbishment management practices in the shipping and construction industries -lessons to be learned’ doi
  98. (1999). Report : Ashford Building Collapse, Health and Safety Executive,
  99. (2000). Rethinking construction: doi
  100. Revitalising Health and Safety doi
  101. Safety Management of Civil Engineering Structures using knowledge-based systems ISMES viale Giulio Cesare. 29 -
  102. (1999). Skills, Knowledge and Competencies for Managing Construction Refurbishment’, doi
  103. Tenth report of Standing Committee on Structural doi
  104. Tenth report of Standing Committee on Structural Safety,
  105. (1995). The art of case research’, doi
  106. (1991). The Building Regulations 2000, Approved Document Part A: (Structure), Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions,
  107. (1981). The Conversion, Improvement and Extension of Buildings, London: Estates Gazette,
  108. (1973). The Nature of Managerial Work, doi
  109. To what extent does the risk assessment include full risk assessment including risk of collapse? No No No No Yes No 3 A guide to risk assessments
  110. To what extent has the Architect identified, evaluated and reviewed potential refurbishment proposals with respect to Health and Safety? No No Yes No No
  111. To what extent has the Client been able to furnish information relating to design, construction, maintenance and history of the use of the building? Yes No No No No
  112. To what extent has the Client provided all the information to enable the Planning Supervisor prepare the pre-tender H&S plan Yes No No Yes No No 5
  113. To what extent has the contractor conducted safety induction for all the workers and explained the method statements? No No No No Yes
  114. To what extent has the Demolition Contractor ensured that manual demolition starts at the top and proceeds downwards? No No No No Yes
  115. To what extent has the Designer detailed the potential problems during and after the structural alterations? No No Yes No No No 5
  116. To what extent has the Designer reviewed specifications relating to Health and Safety issues?
  117. To what extent has the Planning Supervisor prepared Health and Safety control procedures? No No No Yes No No 5
  118. To what extent has the Project Manager aligned Health and Safety plan with the procurement plan? No Yes No No No No 7
  119. To what extent has the Structural Engineer identified existing structural distress, deformation and deterioration in the building elements?
  120. To what extent has the structure been investigated for stability, integrity, and distortion? No No No No No
  121. To what extent have all the Health and Safety issues been identified and enlisted before any proposed demolition?
  122. To what extent have all the Health and Safety issues been identified and enlisted before any proposed demolition? No Yes No No Yes
  123. To what extent have all the requirements of end users been captured? No No Yes No No No 1 Has the Client's brief or requirements for the refurbishment project been met by the Designer's drawings and/ or specifications?
  124. To what extent have the condition of the foundations, roofs, walls and floors been assessed? No No No No No
  125. To what extent have the daily inspections to detect hazards and unsafe conditions been carried out? No Yes No No Yes
  126. To what extent have the Designers/Architect undertaken an environment impact assessment? No No Yes No No No 4 The designers play a major role in managing hazards associated with refurbishment. Please refer to Construction industry council CDM Designers'
  127. To what extent have the load bearing elements been assessed for the presence of any cavities, chases or other sources of potential failure? No No No No No
  128. To what extent have the method statements been prepared for safe working? No No No No Yes
  129. To what extent have the Project Manager and/or Engr Zone ID list Description
  130. To what extent is the Client aware about his duties and responsibilities as the duty holder? Yes No No No No No 1 The clients have specific duties to carry out under CDM regulations. For more information please refer to HSE information sheet 39.
  131. To what extent the method statements include detailed design of temporary supporting structures? No No No No Yes
  132. (1999). Towards a Virtual Environment for Safety-Integrated Site Layout Design and Organisation’, Implementation of safety and health on construction sites:
  133. (2002). Why Buildings Fall Down: How Structures Fail. doi
  134. Wordsworth, P., Lee's Building Maintenance Management

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