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    Audit Committee, May 3, 2012

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    The Effect of Post-Event Information on Recognition and Confidence

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    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of misleading post-event information (PEI) on recognition and confidence. Memory is often altered due to the effects of PEI, and because confidence is used as an indicator of memory accuracy, it is important to test if confidence is positively correlated to accuracy. Participants viewed a slideshow simulating an actor stealing multiple items in a store, and then read a narrative which included misleading, neutral, and confirming PEI about the events in the slideshow. Participants completed a forced choice memory task, and were asked to rate their confidence in the accuracy of their answers. Confirming PEI caused both accuracy and confidence scores within sequence A to increase, and misleading PEI caused accuracy scores in sequence B to decrease. There was no effect of PEI on confidence in sequence B. Five out of six Pearson\u27s r correlations showed a positive significant correlation between confidence and accuracy, suggesting that confidence is a predictor of accuracy. This particular subject has implications as it relates to the validity of the Manson Criteria, specifically criteria\u27s #3 (accuracy), and #5 (confidence)

    Use of Loom-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) for the Detection of Tomato Mosaic Virus

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    Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV) is a rapidly spreading single-strand RNA virus that can quickly infect and destroy entire crop yields. As there is no cure for ToMV, early detection is key; the infected plants must be identified, isolated, and destroyed before the infection spreads. Our aim was to develop a testing strategy that not only had the specificity to detect ToMV but could also be implemented in the field and quickly determine infection. Prior to this study, the most common form of detection was by use of polymerase chain reaction. While accurate, this testing method is costly and takes time, leading to greater crop loss. Our method used Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) with specifically designed primers to target the coding region of the viral RNA responsible for the production of coat proteins. We were able to identify infected plants in as little as five minutes and with limited equipment

    How Sonar May Not Be the Only Means for Detecting Nuclear Submarines

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    Nuclear submarines may be able to avoid sonar but not neutrino detection. The first conducted experiment uses the detection of neutrinos from a decaying isotope of Manganese-54 using a NaI detector which uses scintillation to produce a flash of light when a neutrino is detected inside the detector at varying temperatures. The second experiment detects neutrinos coming from a large nuclear reactor which is similar to a nuclear missile on a submarine. Nuclear weapons release an abundance of neutrinos from the decay of the radioactive material inside them. Over the course of approximately one month, as the temperature measured around the detectors increased to over 22 degrees Celsius the detected neutrinos count dropped below the standard 10 to the seventh power. These experiments show that the release of these particles in a sub nautical area below 20 degrees Celsius are a better means of detection when looking for nuclear submarines

    Similarities in SLITRK Gene Mutations and the Development of Neurological Disorders

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    The SLITRK genes code for transmembrane proteins that modulate neurite outgrowth. Mutations in these genes cause a variety of neurological disorders. To better understand the different expressions of the SLITRK genes and the similarities that link each gene together, six differences in the gene mutations are compared using multiple phylogenetic optimality criteria in two taxa (Homo sapiens and Rattus norvegicus). This project analyzes the link between each of the different SLITRK gene mutations and the devolvement of neurological disorders. Finding a link between the different gene mutations can help to better understand the mutations and assist in the development of future treatments

    Nitrogen in wall pond bridge

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    Nitrite, nitrate, and ammonia are all forms of nitrogen. Excessive amounts of ammonia, nitrates, and nitrites can accelerate eutrophication, causing dramatic increases in aquatic plant growth and changes in the types of plants and animals that live in the pond. The level of nitrate should range from 0-50 mg/L, nitrite should range from 0-3.0 mg/L, and ammonia should range from 0-6 ppm. Excess nitrates can cause hypoxia (low levels of dissolved oxygen) and can become toxic to warm-blooded animals at higher concentrations (10 mg/L) or higher) under certain conditions. This research was conducted at the Wall Pond Bridge on Coastal Carolina University\u27s main campus. The measurements were taken using Hach test strips. It was not found that there was too much nitrogen in the pond

    Regulatory RNA structure in \u3cem\u3eStreptococcus pyogenes\u3c/em\u3e: Terminator of streptolysin S associated gene A

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    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS) is associated with necrotizing fasciitis. The host immune response to this disease is inhibited by the exotoxin streptolysin S (SLS), which is encoded by the sagA gene. Disruption of a rho-independent terminator of the sagA gene leads to transcription of the full sag operon and releases SLS. The programs mfold and RNAfold were used to predict secondary structures of the terminator region. RNA transcripts were generated by in vitro transcription. Differential scanning fluorimetry was used to characterize the secondary structure of the terminator RNA and to select optimal conditions for 3D structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Three-dimensional homology models of the structural motifs within each construct were predicted using the FARFAR program within Rosetta. Determining the structure and interactions of the sagA terminator will add for the development of therapeutics that can decrease SLS expression

    Water Quality in Georgetown County

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    Enterococcus is a type of bacteria that lives in the human GI tract. Conductivity inside water is the understanding the ability of water to pass an electrical current. Salt comes from mainly two sources thought the world. Rocks on land are the major source of salts dissolved in seawater. All these areas they are being monitored for Enterococcus for salinity, conductivity & Enterococci between times of May 08,1997 to January 25, 2021. The results of the water quality at Huntington State Park are as follows: Salinity 34.7 PSU, based on geographic trend map this average puts the salinity level in the 76%-90% range. Conductivity in this location is not available. Enterococci is on average 9MPN/100Ml, based on the geographic map this average is 26%-50% range

    Effects of Carbon-14 radioactivity variations in medical dosimetry

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    The half-life decay period has said to be a constant, meaning there were no discoverable environmental causes that could effect nor change the time at which an isotope decayed. Several other recent studies on this topic have taken various types of radioactive isotopes into account and experimented on their half-life decay, and how there may be factors affecting the, as of today known ˜constant\u27, decay. The isotope Carbon-14 was one of the radioactive isoptope studied and experimented on, testing whether or not there were certain factors that influenced the decay rate of Carbon-14. Medical dosimetrists work with cancer patients and calculate doses of Carbon-14 appropriate for the specific tumors present, develop high level treatment procedures and use external beam radiation therapy for treatment. Results using a liquid scintillator, show that there are no factors that overly impact the Carbon-14 decay constant, or which would make a dramatic difference for medical dosimetrists

    The Chanticleer, 1992-09-15

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    The editorially independent student produced weekly newspaper of Coastal Carolina University.https://digitalcommons.coastal.edu/chanticleer/1266/thumbnail.jp
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