Archivio Istituzionale della Ricerca - Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli"

    Role of c-kit in myocardial regeneration and aging

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    C-Kit, a type III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is involved in multiple intracellular signaling whereby it is mainly considered a stem cell factor receptor, which participates in vital functions of the mammalian body, including the human. Furthermore, c-kit is a necessary yet not sufficient marker to detect and isolate several types of tissue-specific adult stem cells. Accordingly, c-kit was initially used as a marker to identify and enrich for adult cardiac stem/progenitor cells (CSCs) that were proven to be clonogenic, self-renewing and multipotent, being able to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in vitro as well as in vivo after myocardial injury. Afterwards it was demonstrated that c-kit expression labels a heterogenous cardiac cell population, which is mainly composed by endothelial cells while only a very small fraction represents CSCs. Furthermore, c-kit as a signaling molecule is expressed at different levels in this heterogenous c-kit labeled cardiac cell pool, whereby c-kit low expressers are enriched for CSCs while c-kit high expressers are endothelial and mast cells. This heterogeneity in cell composition and expression levels has been neglected in recent genetic fate map studies focusing on c-kit, which have claimed that c-kit identifies cells with robust endothelial differentiation potential but with minimal if not negligible myogenic commitment potential. However, modification of c-kit gene for Cre Recombinase expression in these Cre/Lox genetic fate map mouse models produced a detrimental c-kit haploinsufficiency that prevents efficient labeling of true CSCs on one hand while affecting the regenerative potential of these cells on the other. Interestingly, c-kit haploinsufficiency in c-kit-deficient mice causes a worsening myocardial repair after injury and accelerates cardiac aging. Therefore, these studies have further demonstrated that adult c-kit-labeled CSCs are robustly myogenic and that the adult myocardium relies on c-kit expression to regenerate after injury and to counteract aging effects on cardiac structure and function

    Molecular aspects of drug-induced gingival overgrowth: An in vitro study on amlodipine and gingival fibroblasts

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    Gingival overgrowth is a serious side effect that accompanies the use of amlodipine. Several conflicting theories have been proposed to explain the fibroblast’s function in gingival overgrowth. To determine whether amlodipine alters the fibrotic response, we investigated its effects on treated gingival fibroblast gene expression as compared with untreated cells. Materials and Methods: Fibroblasts from ATCC® Cell Lines were incubated with amlodipine. The gene expression levels of 12 genes belonging to the “Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules” pathway was investigated in treated fibroblasts cell culture, as compared with untreated cells, by real time PCR. Results: Most of the significant genes were up-regulated. (CTNND2, COL4A1, ITGA2, ITGA7, MMP10, MMP11, MMP12, MMP26) except for COL7A1, LAMB1, MMP8, and MMP16, which were down-regulated. Conclusion: These results seem to demonstrate that amlodipine has an effect on the extracellular matrix of gingival fibroblast. In the future, it would be interesting to understand the possible effect of the drug on fibroblasts of patients with amlodipine-induced gingival hyperplasia.Gingival overgrowth is a serious side effect that accompanies the use of amlodipine. Several conflicting theories have been proposed to explain the fibroblast’s function in gingival overgrowth. To determine whether amlodipine alters the fibrotic response, we investigated its effects on treated gingival fibroblast gene expression as compared with untreated cells. Materials and Methods: Fibroblasts from ATCC® Cell Lines were incubated with amlodipine. The gene expression levels of 12 genes belonging to the “Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules” pathway was investigated in treated fibroblasts cell culture, as compared with untreated cells, by real time PCR. Results: Most of the significant genes were up-regulated. (CTNND2, COL4A1, ITGA2, ITGA7, MMP10, MMP11, MMP12, MMP26) except for COL7A1, LAMB1, MMP8, and MMP16, which were down-regulated. Conclusion: These results seem to demonstrate that amlodipine has an effect on the extracellular matrix of gingival fibroblast. In the future, it would be interesting to understand the possible effect of the drug on fibroblasts of patients with amlodipine-induced gingival hyperplasia

    Superficial spreading and nodular melanoma (including amelanotic melanoma)

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    The incidence of melanoma has increased over the last few decades, and mortality has only recently stabilized. In Central Europe its incidence has increased similarly to that in the United States, from 3-4 cases to 10-15 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The highest incidence of melanoma is recorded in Australia and New Zealand oscillating between 40 and 60 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year.1 In a recent study in Catalonia the incidence increased from 6.74 in 2000 to 8.64 in 2007 for all melanomas, with the Breslow thickness being stable during this period. The increase in invasive melanoma incidence in the elderly was remarkably up to 15.49 in the 60-64 year population.2 It is known that certain populations, such as men >60 years of age and lower socioeconomic status groups, face a greater burden from disease. Men have shown worse melanoma survival than women, and low socioeconomic status groups have increased levels of mortality.

    Importance of seismic site response and soil-structure interaction in the dynamic behaviour of a tall building founded on piles

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    A tall public building in Naples (Italy) has recently undergone a seismic vulnerability assessment, following the new Italian code requirements. The building is about 100 m high and is founded on a piled raft floating in a thick layer of soft pyroclastic and alluvial soils. On the basis of a conventional subsoil classification, the inertial seismic actions on the building would lead to expensive measures for seismic retrofitting. By contrast, if site effects and soil-structure interaction are adequately addressed the picture is completely different. First, free-field seismic response analyses highlighted the beneficial effects of a peat layer, acting as a natural damper on the propagation of shear waves. Finiteelement analyses of pile-soil kinematic interaction were then carried out to define the foundation input motion, which was found not to be significantly affected. The effects of inertial interaction were evaluated accounting for soil-foundation compliance; they resulted in an increase of the structural period of vibration, while the overall damping did not change compared to that of the fixed-base structure. The increased structural period led to further reduction of spectral acceleration. The results could lead to significant impacts on the seismic assessment of slender buildings founded on piles embedded in deformable soils

    - Tipi societari e impresa sociale: profili notarili

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