East Tennessee State University

    The Acute Effect Of Whole Body Vibration On 30 Meter Fly Sprint Performance

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    Abstract available in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Researc

    Authentication via OpenAthens: Implementing a Single Sign-on Solution for Primo, Alma, and EZproxy

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    OpenAthens is a hosted identity and access management service that provides a streamlined solution for implementing single sign-on authentication. This presentation will outline the steps East Tennessee State University took to configure OpenAthens authentication across the Alma, Primo, and EZproxy platforms. We will give a brief overview of the internal configurations related to LDAP integration, allocating electronic resources, and selectively assigning permissions. Finally, we will share our experiences with OpenAthens including support, vendor adoption, and end user benefits

    Positive Connections: An Initial Step in Addressing School Failure in High Schools

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    Positive Connections is a screening tool that quickly highlights secondary students at risk for school failure by providing (a) a list of at-risk students, (b) emphasizing teacher-student relationships, and (c) creating opportunity for early interventions

    Relationship Between Concentric Velocities at Varying Intensity in the Back Squat Using a Wireless Inertial Sensor

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    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of velocities in the back squat between one repetition maximum (1RM) and submaximally loaded repetition maximum (RM) conditions, specifically in regard to what has been described as the minimal velocity threshold (MVT). The MVT describes a minimum concentric velocity that an individual must reach or surpass in order to successfully complete a repetition. Design: To test the presence of a MVT, participants were tested for 1RM and RM back squat ability. The mean concentric veloci ties (MCV) of the last successful repetition of each condition were then compared. Methods: Fourteen male participants familiar with the back squat volunteered to participate in the current study (age = 25.0 y ± 2.6, height = 178.9 cm ± 8.1, body mass = 88.2 kg ± 15.8). The mean concentric velocity (MCV) during the last successful repetition from each testing condition was considered for the comparison. Results: Results indicated a non-significant negative relationship of MCV between the 1RM and RM conditions (r = -0.135), no statistical difference between testing conditions (p = 0.266), with a small-to-moderate effect size (d = 0.468). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that MVT should be further investigated to enhance its use in the practical setting. Additionally, coaches considering using a velocity-based approach for testing athletes should use data from either 1RM or RM conditions, but not both interchangeably. Coaches should be cautious when considering group averages or comparing velocity data between athletes, which may not be appropriate based on our results

    The Chelation of Metal Ions by Vicibactin, a Siderophore Produced by Rhizobium leguminosarum ATCC 14479

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    Vicibactin is a small, high-affinity iron chelator produced by Rhizobium leguminosarum ATCC 14479. Previous work has shown that vicibactin is produced and secreted from the cell to sequester ferric iron from the environment during iron-deplete conditions. This ferric iron is then transported into the cell to be converted into ferrous iron. This study uses UV-Vis spectroscopy as well as ion trap-time of flight mass spectroscopy to determine that vicibactin does form a complex with copper(II) ions, however, at a much lower affinity than for iron(III). Stability tests have shown that the copper(II)-vicibactin complex is stable over time. The results of this study show that vicibactin could be used in order to remove copper(II) ions from the soil or other media if they are present in toxic amounts. It also suggests that vicibactin’s purpose for the rhizobia could be expanded to include both copper sequestering and to reduce extracellular copper concentrations to prevent toxicity

    Where the Feral Things Are: An Analysis of how the USDA and Department of the Interior’s Agencies Manage Feral Hogs, Horses, and Burros

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    Title: “Where the Feral Things Are: An analysis of how the USDA and Department of the Interior’s Agencies Manage Feral Hogs, Horses and Burros” Author: Elizabeth Poczobut, MPA Candidate, Department of Political Science, Public Policy and International Affairs, College of Arts and Sciences, ETSU. Abstract: Many Americans cannot picture the “Wild West” without also picturing the majesty, liberty and mystique of wild horses roaming the plains. This deeply held cultural view of wild horses lead to the 1971 passage of the Wild, Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. This act tasked the Department of the Interior, and subsequently the Bureau of Land Management, with protecting wild horses and burros from “capture, branding, harassment, or death…as an integral part of the natural system of the public lands.” In 1971, there were approximately 25,000 free-roaming horses and burros on public land in the western United States. That number has grown to over 70,000 animals today, and the Bureau of Land Management alone spends approximately $81 million in taxpayer money every year to continue carrying out the management objectives set in 1971. Wild horses and burros are a uniquely protected and managed non-native species in the United States due to a variety of administrative, cultural and legal management constraints. They are protected from many forms of eradication and have virtually no natural predators. When feral horses are compared with other non-native species like wild hogs, the management inequalities are obvious. The United States Department of Agriculture estimates that there are 5 million feral hogs roaming the United States, and that they are responsible for about $1.5 million in damages to natural resources. Unlike feral horses, feral hogs are managed by a variety of means up to and including unrestricted eradication. This paper will analyze the non-native, mammal management practices of five major United States agencies and compare legislation, cultural expectations and administrative regulations of these two major feral species. The attempted resolutions and new management proposals are also discussed, and the potential implications of these are taken into consideration

    4 Imperatives of Great Leaders

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    East Tennessee State University is based in US
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