DSpace University of New Mexico

    RAP AND RESISTANCE: VISIONS OF SELF AND SOCIETY IN AMERICAN, AFRICAN, AND FRENCH HIP HOP MUSIC

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    Rap and Resistance: Visions of Self and Society in American, African, and French Hip Hop Music probes the ties between the formation of subjectivity in rap and its strategies of resistance against state, cultural, and societal violence and control of minority groups. This study examines the themes of the body, economy, and social grouping through analyses of rap music and lyrics. The first chapter focuses on state control and violence, particularly in Black populations in the United States. The second investigates the practice of Female Genital Cutting in West Africa and the various responses and activism of African rappers. Chapter three discusses the identities of the economically disadvantaged populations and immigrants who reside in the space of the banlieue and how their image shapes their interactions with French society as a whole. Studying rap music as a cultural expression, a mode of thought, and a politics makes it possible to inform our understanding of the debates and social problems that are currently at the fore among young, marginal groups. Finally, this thesis aims to show how the local and global qualities of rap production make it a vital and revolutionary stage for social change, personal agency, and non-violent communication.FrenchMastersUniversity of New Mexico. Dept. of Foreign Languages and LiteraturesVallury, RajeshwariBishop, StephenPutnam, Walte

    Effects of climate change upon birds in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts

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    Climate change has increasingly become an area of concern in relation to ecological communities. In this study, climatic signals were investigated to determine whether bird diversity indices in the Breeding Conservation Region (BCR) of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts were related (1) to the oceanic/atmospheric systems El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and/or the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO); (2) to regional moisture influences determined by the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI); and (3) to local precipitation and temperature. Specifically, an examination was conducted to determine the relationship between climatic variables for thirteen bird species, total abundance (individuals), and species richness observed over a 40 year period from 1970 to 2009 on 14 different Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) routes. Data were analyzed using the Open Source version of the S language called R. Multi-panel scatterplots, Pearson correlation coefficients, and variance inflation factors (VIF) were used to identify collinearity (correlation between covariates). An Information Theoretic (IT) approach was applied to compare a set of 12 climatic models. Generalized linear mixed modeling (GLMM) was applied to analyze multiple observations per route. The results indicated that birds are individualistically responding to climatic signals at different probability intensities at the 95% confidence level: a weak signal (between a probability of 0.001-0.05), and a strong signal (less than a probability of 0.001). Four important IT results utilizing Akaike’s Information Criteria (AIC) included each bird species diversity index responding (1) differently to each of the twelve AIC climatic models; (2) differently to covariates or explanatory climatic influences [Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI), AMO, Precipitation, Temperature, and PDSI] established within the models, in a positive or negative manner; (3) differently in relation to the significance intensities [Probability (Pr) values] to covariates or explanatory climatic variables within the models; and (4) differently to climatic influences present during the spring and summer months.Northern New Mexico CollegeBiologyMastersUniversity of New Mexico. Biology Dept.Collins, ScottParmenter, BobWitt, Chri

    Personalities

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    The University of New Mexic

    Tiwa

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    The University of New Mexic

    Authorities for the Identification of Archaeological Material

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    The University of New Mexic

    Volume Information

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    The University of New Mexic

    21 escritoras mexicanas revolucionarias

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    entrevista de Particia Rosas Lopátegui sobre su libro "Óyeme con los ojos - de Sor Juana al siglo XXI"entrevista de Particia Rosas Lopátegui sobre su libro "Óyeme con los ojos - de Sor Juana al siglo XXI

    Cannabinoid 2 receptor (CB2R) agonists modulate neuropathic pain and cytokine expression

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    The focus of the work in this dissertation is to elucidate the efficacy of cannabinoid 2 receptor agonists, specifically targeting the spinal cord, for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. Chemical structures for all cannabinoid compounds utilized are displayed (Supplemental Figure A-1). As an orientation for the reader, the organization of this dissertation consists of five components: chapters 1 through 5. In the first chapter, a background is developed to acquaint one with the topics of chronic pain, and the use of cannabinergic compounds for chronic pain relief. This chapter is in the form of a review, and specifically addresses (1) the underlying differences in physiological processes during periods of acute pain compared to chronic pain, (2) the role of spinal cord glial cells under conditions of chronic inflammation, reflecting what is seen under chronic pain conditions, (3) the endogenous cannabinoid system; (4) evidence that specifically targeting the cannabinoid 2 receptor in the spinal cord may eventually be ideal for the treatment of chronic pain; and (5) the current clinical trial endeavors utilizing cannabinoid 2 receptor agonists. Following the review, evidence will be presented in support of the stated specific aims. Specific aim 1 of this dissertation will be in the form of two published manuscripts. The first manuscript, Chapter 2, explores the efficacy of one of the most widely utilized cannabinoid 2 receptor agonists, AM1241 following a peri-spinal, intrathecal injection. I display a dose-dependent effect, and the timecourse of the compound’s ability to reverse pain symptoms. Further, using immunohistochemical techniques I detail a novel method of quantifying discrete anatomical changes in the immunostaining of inflammatory markers via the use of a computer assisted analysis of the entire spectral range of a variety of fluorescently-tagged antibodies. I refer to this method as ‘spectral analysis’. This spectral analysis approach is more sensitive and accuate than conventional methods. Finally, this manuscript examines changes in critical factors known to mediate pathological pain in both the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglia. The second manuscript, Chapter 3, explores the efficacy of a novel cannabinoid 2 receptor agonist AM1710 belonging to a chemically distinct classification of cannabinoid-like compounds following a peri-spinal, intrathecal injection. As in the first manuscript, for this compound, I display a dose-dependent effect, and the time course of the compound’s ability to reverse pain symptoms. Additionally, spectral analysis methods are utilized to examine AM1710’s ability to alter levels of critical factors known to mediate pathological pain, in both the spinal cord dorsal horn and the dorsal root ganglia. Finally, this manuscript characterizes AM1710’s ability to act through anti-inflammatory pathways via peri-spinal glial cells within the meninges surrounding the spinal cord to block the development of neuropathic pain in a purely immune-mediated model of chronic pain. Specific aim 2 is in the form of a fourth manuscript to be submitted for peer-review in The Journal of Pain. The studies presented here within Chapter 4, are completed and provide evidence for AM1710’s specificity to act via a restricted cannabinoid type 2 receptor, and not on the other classical cannabinoid receptor, the cannabinoid type 1 receptor. Further, the use of transgenic mice that lack functional cannabinoid 1 receptors uncovers a potentially novel and protective role of the endocannabinoid system under chronic pain conditions. Chapter 5 consists of a discussion of the main points from all the prior chapters to support the overarching thesis that the use of cannabinoid 2 receptor agonists is effective for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Additionally presented is a critique of some of the methods used to conduct experiments, and a supporting rationale for why these methods were selected. This dissertation concludes with potential future directions of this work, to further elucidate the endocannabinoid system for pain control.Biomedical SciencesDoctoralUniversity of New Mexico. Biomedical Sciences Graduate ProgramMilligan, ErinWallace, JamesCunningham, Lee AnnaBizzozero, Osca

    When in Our Music God is Glorified

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    Work for SSATBB choir a cappella. Words by Fred Pratt Green. To Sheldon Kalberg. Written on January 28, 2000

    Two Songs for Soprano and Marimba

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    Work for soprano and marimba or piano. To Martha Rowe and Fred Bugbee. On poems by James J. Meeker
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