ChesterRep

    An evaluation of Advice 4 Youth: A health and support service for young people

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    This report discusses and evaluates the work of Advice 4 Youth - in particular it seeks to develop effective and efficient systems for routine data collection, provide data on uptake of services by young people, analyse data to reveal a pattern of useage in relation to key variables, and assess the general progress of Advice 4 Youth.North Cheshire Health

    Immersive Virtual Reality for the Cognitive Rehabilitation of Stroke Survivors

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    “©2022 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.”We present the results of a double-blind phase 2b randomized control trial that used a custom built virtual reality environment for the cognitive rehabilitation of stroke survivors. A stroke causes damage to the brain and problem solving, memory and task sequencing are commonly affected. The brain can recover to some extent, however, and stroke patients have to relearn how to carry out activities of daily living. We have created an application called VIRTUE to enable such activities to be practiced using immersive virtual reality. Gamification techniques enhance the motivation of patients such as by making the level of difficulty of a task increase over time. The design and implementation of VIRTUE is described together with the results of the trial conducted within the Stroke Unit of a large hospital. We report on the safety and acceptability of VIRTUE. We have also observed particular benefits of VR treatment for stroke survivors that experienced more severe cognitive impairment, and an encouraging reduction in time spent in the hospital for all patients that received the VR treatment

    Five years of national policies: progress towards tackling obesity in England.

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    From PubMed via Jisc Publications RouterPublication status: aheadofprin

    The Bogus Men: Eno, Ferry and Roxy Music

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    Book chapter

    A Christian Case for Farmed Animal Welfare

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    From MDPI via Jisc Publications RouterHistory: accepted 2019-12-08, pub-electronic 2019-12-11Publication status: PublishedFunder: Arts and Humanities Research Council; Grant(s): AH/R014752/1It is now common to blame Christianity for broader society’s general inattention to the needs and comfort of animals in general, and farmed animals in particular. This critique of Christianity claims that certain biblical themes and particular biblical passages form the foundation for an anti-animal position that Christianity has imposed on Christians and on wider Western society. This article concedes that Christianity has often been used to justify exploitation of animals, but argues that it is a mistake to consider Christianity inevitably opposed to concern for animals. After reviewing the views of critics such as Lynn White Jr., Peter Singer, and Tom Regan, the article demonstrates the complexity of interpreting biblical passages and the possibility of readings that affirm the importance of treating animals well. It shows that Christians have indeed been advocates for animals, notably in relation to the first legislation against animal cruelty in the early nineteenth century and the formation of the RSPCA. Finally, it proposes a constructive framework for a Christian ethics of farmed animal welfare that could provide the basis for Christian action to reduce consumption of animals and shift to higher welfare sources of animal products

    Reasons for indoor tanning use and the acceptability of alternatives: A qualitative study.

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    From PubMed via Jisc Publications RouterHistory: received 2020-08-05, revised 2021-07-26, accepted 2021-08-19Publication status: aheadofprintUsing indoor tanning devices is associated with substantial health consequences, such as an increased risk of melanoma and other skin cancers. Many people including minors and some at high risk of skin cancer continue to use these devices. In the absence of effective restrictions on use, it is important that behaviour change interventions are designed to reduce indoor tanning. To explore reasons for use of indoor tanning devices and the acceptability of alternatives in adult users residing in North-West England. Participants were required to be current indoor tanners aged 18 years and above and were recruited online. Twenty-one participants took part in either a focus group or semi-structured interview. An inductive thematic analysis was conducted. Six themes were identified: psychological benefits; improving physical health; denial of health risks; alternatives do not meet psychological needs; alternatives do not meet physical needs; and perceived side-effects. Participants used indoor tanning devices to improve their self-esteem and to prevent sun damage to their skin (by gaining a 'base tan'). Participants appeared to justify their usage by responding defensively to avoid accepting they were at risk, exaggerating the benefits of indoor tanning, and discounting alternatives to indoor tanning. Alternatives to indoor tanning were perceived as risky for health, inadequate to provide the desired aesthetic, and incapable of meeting their self-esteem needs. Interventions to reduce indoor tanning behaviour should increase sources of self-esteem other than appearance, increase media literacy and address defensive responses to information around indoor tanning and alternatives. Further research is needed to develop these interventions and assess their feasibility. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2021. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

    THE HEALTH IMPACT OF SCAMS

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    From Crossref via Jisc Publications RouterHistory: epub 2019-11-08, ppub 2019-11-08Article version: VoRAbstract This presentation will offer new and alternate insights into ‘scams’ and the health effects of fraud on older people. It reports data captured from a Mass Observation Project “Directive” focusing on scams and their impact on individuals. Eighty “Observers’” aged 50 and over responded to the “Directive”. Responses indicate that falling victim to a scam may have negative impacts on individuals’ mental wellbeing, self-esteem and relationships with others. Data analysis also identified that fear of victimisation can also affect individuals, resulting in worry, anxiety and maladaptive coping strategies. Offering a sociology of health perspective, we will focus is on these health impacts of scams and the legitimisation of the issue as a socio-political problem. We will also highlight additional important areas for consideration, such as the absence of a common understanding of the concept and nomenclature of ‘scam’, and the ‘vagaries of scams’ by presenting a typology of scams

    TEST delete 11-3-19

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    The impact of graphene oxide sheet lateral dimensions on their pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution profiles in mice.

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    From PubMed via Jisc Publications RouterHistory: received 2020-05-02, revised 2021-08-11, accepted 2021-08-16Publication status: aheadofprintAlthough the use of graphene and 2-dimensional (2D) materials in biomedicine has been explored for over a decade now, there are still significant knowledge gaps regarding the fate of these materials upon interaction with living systems. Here, the pharmacokinetic profile of graphene oxide (GO) sheets of three different lateral dimensions was studied. The GO materials were functionalized with a PEGylated DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid), a radiometal chelating agent for radioisotope attachment for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging. Our results revealed that GO materials with three distinct size distributions, large (l-GO-DOTA), small (s-GO-DOTA) and ultra-small (us-GO-DOTA), were sequestered by the spleen and liver. Significant accumulation of the large material (l-GO-DOTA) in the lungs was also observed, unlike the other two materials. Interestingly, there was extensive urinary excretion of all three GO nanomaterials indicating that urinary excretion of these structures was not affected by lateral dimensions. Comparing with previous studies, we believe that the thickness of layered nanomaterials is the predominant factor that governs their excretion rather than lateral size. However, the rate of urinary excretion was affected by lateral size, with large GO excreting at slower rates. This study provides better understanding of 2D materials behaviour with different structural features in vivo. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2021. Published by Elsevier B.V.

    Engaging older people to explore the age-friendliness of a rural community in Northern England: A photo-elicitation study.

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    From PubMed via Jisc Publications RouterHistory: received 2020-02-20, revised 2021-04-13, accepted 2021-04-20Publication status: ppublishAn ageing society brings with it increased health costs due to the prevalence of long term conditions increasing with age. It is therefore vital to support good health in older people, both to improve their quality of life and to reduce the financial implications of an ageing society. Isolation and loneliness can put people at risk of dying early, and increasing opportunities for social interaction and engagement could mitigate some of the health effects of ageing. However, this requires society to create the conditions that enable older people to participate fully. The World Health Organization's Age-Friendly Cities programme has identified factors that make urban areas Age-Friendly, but research shows that older rural dwellers have unique unmet needs preventing full engagement in their communities. This article describes a pilot project which adapted photo-elicitation to explore the age-friendliness of a rural area in Calderdale, Northern England. It shows that photo-elicitation is a successful method for identifying what older people think is important in making their community age-friendly and it reveals differences between ageing in a city and in a rural setting. This rich data can be used to inform the development of policy in rural areas which is more closely aligned to the needs, preferences and interests of the growing population of older residents. The project also demonstrates the engagement potential of this methodology. Participants continued as co-researchers, learning new skills and taking responsibility for a variety of dissemination activities such as photographic exhibitions, a public report and presentations. This suggests that adapted photo-elicitation is a useful tool for engaging older people in research. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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