Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics

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    Latin American Newspaper Coverage of Climate Change or Global Warming, 2005-2023 - January 2024

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    The Media and Climate Change Observatory Data monitors 131 sources (across newspapers, radio and TV) in 59 countries in seven different regions around the world. Data is assembled by accessing archives through the Lexis Nexis, Proquest and Factiva databases via the University of Colorado libraries. More information may be found at: http://mecco.colorado.edu.</p

    Australian Newspaper Coverage of Climate Change or Global Warming, 2000-2023 - December 2023

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    The Media and Climate Change Observatory Data monitors 131 sources (across newspapers, radio and TV) in 59 countries in seven different regions around the world. Data is assembled by accessing archives through the Lexis Nexis, Proquest and Factiva databases via the University of Colorado libraries. More information may be found at: http://mecco.colorado.edu.</p

    Unfortunate frontiers: patterns of skeletal trauma in the Colorado State Hospital 1879-1898

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    This project explores trauma patterning in an institutionalized population from a late 19th-century state asylum in Colorado. The results are compared to contemporaneous skeletal assemblages and interpreted through the poetics of violence. A sample of 40 individuals from the skeletal assemblage associated with Cemetery 2 (1879-1898) of the Colorado State Hospital were assessed for traumatic injury. Fractures were documented by location, type, degree of healing, and descriptive measurements. Demographic distributions of trauma and analyses of injuries by body area demonstrate to what extent different cohorts of individuals presented with differential risks regarding traumatic injury. Of the 40 adult individuals assessed, 27 (67.5%) exhibited at least one fracture. Over half of these individuals (55%) exhibited more than one fracture. The most common fracture site was the ribs, with 18 individuals (66% of those with fractures) displaying one or more rib fractures. Amongst this sample, 44% females exhibited fractures in comparison to 74% of males. Nine individuals exhibited multiple fractures at varying stages of healing, suggesting injury recidivism. The extensive trauma in this sample fits patterns of occupational injuries and interpersonal violence, signifying the hazards of mining, farming, and institutionalization that these individuals faced. Trauma frequencies are significantly higher in this population than other contemporary institutional contexts, potentially reflecting unique intersections of gendered divisions of labor, violence, and institutional practices on the American western frontier.</p

    Exploring Disproportionate Arrest Rates: Adding Social Class to the Conversation

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    This study examines the likelihood of arrest based on socioeconomic status using labeling theory. I build on prior research by distinguishing between race effects and class effects, ultimately introducing social class as a predominant factor in police discretion. Using data from the University of Missouri &ndash; St. Louis Comprehensive School Safety Initiative (UMSL CSSI) I found that individuals with low socioeconomic status have a 5% higher chance of experiencing sanctions than adolescents with high socioeconomic status when committing the same crime. My research aligns with prior studies in that African Americans are 4.5% more likely to experience arrest than members of other racial and ethnic groups. When conducting an ordinary least squares regression analysis, the results also reveal that controlling for socioeconomic status removes race as a statistically significant predictor of arrest. There is, however, a statistically significant predictor for SES on arrest decisions even when controlling for self-report offending (c = .031, SE = .01, p = .003). I discuss the implications for theory as well as policy in the paper.</p

    Who Votes for Vox? The Rise of the Radical Right in Spain

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    &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Over the past two decades, populist radical right parties have become increasingly prevalent in Western Europe. The rise of the radical right has been explained as a reaction to increased immigration and processes of modernization such as globalization and post-industrial developments. However, Spain did not follow the same pattern as other countries. Despite being a country with high levels of immigration, citizens remained relatively tolerant toward immigrants, and no radical right-wing parties achieved significant electoral success. However, Spain's exceptional status appeared to change after the emergence of Vox in 2019, the country&rsquo;s first successful far right-wing party since the country&rsquo;s transition to democracy in the 1970s. Because of the late development of the radical right in Spain and the country&rsquo;s history of tolerance toward immigrants, explaining the rise of Vox has been difficult: though Vox&rsquo;s platform aligns with populist radical right-wing parties in other countries, it is unclear if Vox voters follow the same demographic and ideological patterns as right-wing voters in other countries. In this thesis, I investigate the individual-level demographic and ideological features of Vox voters. I demonstrate that contrary to previous findings, Vox voters generally align with trends exhibited by radical-right wing voters in other countries. Despite Spain&rsquo;s history of &ldquo;Spanish exceptionalism,&rdquo; Vox voters are not exceptional among their radical right-wing counterparts.</p

    Home indoor air quality and cognitive function over one year for people working remotely during COVID

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    The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic triggered an increase in remote work-from-home for office workers. Given that many homes now function as offices despite not being designed to support office work, it is critical to research the impact of indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes on the cognitive performance of people working from home. In this study, we followed 206 office workers across the U.S. over one year under remote or hybrid-remote settings during 2021&ndash;2022. Participants placed two real-time, consumer-grade indoor environmental monitors in their home workstation area and bedroom. Using a custom smartphone application geofenced to their residential address, participants responded to surveys and periodic cognitive function tests, including the Stroop color&ndash;word interference test, Arithmetic two-digit addition/subtraction test, and Compound Remote Associates Task (cRAT). Exposures assessed included carbon dioxide (CO2) and thermal conditions (indoor heat index: a combination of temperature and relative humidity) averaged over 30 min prior to each cognitive test. In adjusted longitudinal mixed models (n &le; 126), we found that indoor thermal conditions at home were associated with cognitive function outcomes non-linearly (p &lt; 0.05), with poorer cognitive performance on the Stroop test and poorer creative problem-solving on the cRAT when conditions were either too warm or too cool. Most indoor CO2 levels were &lt;640 ppm, but there was still a slight association between higher CO2 and poorer cognitive performance on Stroop (p = 0.09). Our findings highlight the need to enhance home indoor environmental quality for optimal cognitive function during remote work, with benefits for both employees and employers.</p

    European Newspaper Coverage of Climate Change or Global Warming, 2004-2024 - March 2024

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    The Media and Climate Change Observatory Data monitors 131 sources (across newspapers, radio and TV) in 59 countries in seven different regions around the world. Data is assembled by accessing archives through the Lexis Nexis, Proquest and Factiva databases via the University of Colorado libraries. More information may be found at: http://mecco.colorado.edu.</p

    Quasilinear Analysis in Positive and Negative Triangularity

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    &nbsp;As we continue to improve the performance of fusion reactors, it is necessary to predict the turbulent transport of particles and energy. Particle transport of high-Z impurities such as Carbon in DIII-D or Tung sten in ITER may not fully ionize and produce significant line radiation. This particle and energy transport can be modeled via computer simulation. However, modeling tokamak plasmas can be a time-consuming and costly endeavor due to the nonlinear nature of the gyrokinetic system of equations. To expedite this process, linear simulations can be employed to simplify these models. In good confinement regimes, it is reasonable to assume that the turbulent fluctuations are made up of a superposition of linear eigenmodes so that quasilinear expressions for fluxes are valid. What is more uncertain is the turbulent saturation level. An investigation into three theory-based models capturing what is currently used in the community will be presented and used to model a DIII-D shot with a Carbon impurity. In addition, these theory-based models will be used to test the effects of negative triangularity in the H-mode regime. Linear GENE calculations provide ion-scale eigenvalue and eigenmode information for detailed quasilinear flux estimates.&nbsp;</p

    Issai Aquino Sotelo Onboarding and Training Badge Reflection

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    This submission pertains to the Office of the Registrar and highlights my role as Student Lead III. Demonstrating exceptional Training and Onboarding skills, I played a crucial role in the interviewing and training processes, selecting and integrating four new hires over 16 weeks. My proactive approach to updating training protocols and dedication to fostering inclusivity and mentorship underline my capability to enhance team dynamics. My contribution showcases my aptitude for roles requiring robust leadership and effective training abilities, proving me an indispensable asset to any team-focused environment.</p

    World Radio Coverage of Climate Change or Global Warming, 2000-2024 - January 2024

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    The Media and Climate Change Observatory Data monitors 131 sources (across newspapers, radio and TV) in 59 countries in seven different regions around the world. Data is assembled by accessing archives through the Lexis Nexis, Proquest and Factiva databases via the University of Colorado libraries. More information may be found at: http://mecco.colorado.edu.</p

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