2,476,953 research outputs found

    Attributes of graduate entry nurses: An integrative review

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    Second degree graduate entry (GEN) programmes transition graduates into the nursing workforce using the candidateā€™s first degree to fast track a career change. This presentation explores the attributes of graduate entry nurses as background to developing a graduate entry Master of Health Science degree in nursing. A qualitative integrative review approach was used to synthesise the findings of 24 published research reports on attributes of graduate entry nurses. Data bases searched included CINAHL, Proquest, Science Direct, and open source data bases included Pubmed, DOAJ and CORE, using keywords ā€˜graduate entry nursingā€™, ā€˜academic performanceā€™, ā€˜readiness for practiceā€™, ā€˜socialisationā€™, and ā€˜perceptionsā€™. The Critical Appraisal Programmes (CASP, 2017) Checklist was used to ascertain the quality, relevance and validity of the articles identified in the database and other search approaches. A thematic synthesis approach (Thomas & Harden, 2008) was used to analyse the qualitative information presented as findings in the articles. This approach used three levels of analysis; coding of text line by line, the identification of descriptive themes, and the creation of analytical themes. Descriptive themes were used to group statements from the text of the articles, and analytical themes were developed as interpretive explanations created in the conceptual synthesis. The analytical themes developed included; confidence, motivation, and competence as learners; emotional intelligence within relationships; focus on research-based practice; and challenges for faculty. GEN students require professional socialisation that takes account of the attributes they bring to nursing. GENs need educational approaches and supervision that offer opportunities for critical reflection and peer support

    Protecting a Portion of the Beaver Dam Heath Conservation Focus Area and Initiating Innovative Conservation Financing in Berwick, Maine

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    This project permanently protected 28 acres in the Beaver Dam Heath Conservation Focus Area through a bargain sale of the fee simple interest. The Grants Meadow III parcel is 85% wetland. The remainder of the upland lies along Diamond Hill Road with adequate frontage for 2-3 house lots. This project involved outreach to the Town of Berwick for project funding to match the PREP funding awarded. GWRLT also received NAWCA funds to complete the project

    Comparative evaluation of phytochemical profiles and identification of flavonoids in cereal grains

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    The phytochemicals including flavonoids and phenolic acids mainly contained in the outer layer of the kernels are key factors responsible for the biofunctionality of whole grains. The phytochemical profiles of twelve grain samples comprising 6 wheats, 3 barleys and 3 oats were studied for comparative evaluation of their antioxidant properties. Total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activities (DPPH and ORAC) of the grain extracts were measured. The bound phenolic acids were identified and quantified using HPLC and mass spectrometry. The flavonoids in different grain were analyzed using HPLC and tandem mass spectrometric techniques. TPC in acidified methanol extracts ranged from 164 to 226, 264-391, and 308-331 mg/100 g for wheat, oats and barley, respectively. Similarly TPC in acetone extracts were 78 to 118, 223 to 351 and 367 to 433 mg/100 g. Acetone extracts had significantly (p < 0.05) higher TPC than acidified methanol extracts for barley samples. On the contrary, acidified methanol extracts from wheat and oats had higher TPC than their acetone extracts. The results showed that for both acetone and acidified methanol extracts, barley samples had significantly higher antioxidant activity than oats and wheat samples although even some of the oats had similar or even higher TPC compared to barley samples. Wheat extracts had low antioxidant activity assayed using both DPPH and ORAC assays. Oats had the highest levels of bound phenolic acids (431 to 656 mg/100 g) followed by wheat samples (91 to 153 mg/100 g). The bound phenolic acid contents of barley samples ranged from 81ā€“105 mg/100 g. The major flavonoids in barley samples are dimers and trimers of proanthocyanidins, while flavone glucosides are the major flavonoids for wheat. The phytochemical including flavonoid profile may explain the antioxidant activity for different cereal grain rather than TPC

    Trust Games Measure Trust

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    The relationship between trust and risk is a topic of enduring interest. Although there are substantial differences between the ideas the terms express, many researchers from different disciplines have pointed out that these two concepts become very closely related in personal exchange contexts. This raises the important practical concern over whether behaviors in the widely-used ā€œtrust gameā€ actually measure trust, or instead reveal more about risk attitudes. It is critical to confront this question rigorously, as data from these games are increasingly used to support conclusions from a wide variety of fields including macroeconomic development, social psychology and cultural anthropology. The aim of this paper is to provide cogent evidence on the relationship between trust and risk in ā€œtrustā€ games. Subjects in our experiment participate either in a trust game or in its risk game counterpart. In the trust version, subjects play a standard trust game and know their counterparts are human. In the risk version, subjects know their counterparts are computers making random decisions. We compare decisions between these treatments, and also correlate behavior with subjectsā€™ risk attitudes as measured by the Holt and Laury (2002) risk instrument. We provide evidence that trusting behavior is different than behavior under risk. In particular, (i) decisions patterns in our trust and risk games are significantly different; and (ii) risk attitudes predict decisions in the risk game, but not the trust game.

    Trust Games Measure Trust

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    The relationship between trust and risk is a topic of enduring interest. Although there are substantial differences between the ideas the terms express, many researchers from different disciplines have pointed out that these two concepts become very closely related in personal exchange contexts. This raises the important practical concern over whether behaviors in the widely-used Ć¢ā‚¬Å“trust gameĆ¢ā‚¬ actually measure trust, or instead reveal more about risk attitudes. It is critical to confront this question rigorously, as data from these games are increasingly used to support conclusions from a wide variety of fields including macroeconomic development, social psychology and cultural anthropology. The aim of this paper is to provide cogent evidence on the relationship between trust and risk in Ć¢ā‚¬Å“trustĆ¢ā‚¬ games. Subjects in our experiment participate either in a trust game or in its risk game counterpart. In the trust version, subjects play a standard trust game and know their counterparts are human. In the risk version, subjects know their counterparts are computers making random decisions. We compare decisions between these treatments, and also correlate behavior with subjectsā€™ risk attitudes as measured by the Holt and Laury (2002) risk instrument. We provide evidence that trusting behavior is different than behavior under risk. In particular, (i) decisions patterns in our trust and risk games are significantly different; and (ii) risk attitudes correlate with decisions in the risk game, but not the trust game.trust; risk attitudes; laboratory experiments

    Isle of Gigha Heritage Trust: an innovation history

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    The Isle of Gigha Heritage Trust is a company limited by guarantee with a charitable status, consisting of an elected board of directors to represent the Isle of Gigha residents. Since its inception, the Isle of Gigha Heritage Trust has created three subsidiary trading companies, which operate the islandā€™s commercial activities (such as the running of three wind turbines). These provide the Trust with financial sustainability and fund regeneration on the island. The aims of the Trust in setting up Gigha Renewable Energy Limited were, firstly, to advance community ownership and development on the island; secondly, to promote the financial, social and environmental sustainability of the island; and thirdly, to generate profits to be recycled into other community projects on the island, including housing improvements and energy efficiency measures. This innovation history traces the development of the Isle of Gigha Heritage Trust from its inception (i.e. when the community bought their island from its laird in 2002) through to its development of a portfolio of renewable and energy efficiency projects

    Trust Games Measure Trust

    Get PDF
    The relationship between trust and risk is a topic of enduring interest. Although there are substantial differences between the ideas the terms express, many researchers from different disciplines have pointed out that these two concepts become very closely related in personal exchange contexts. This raises the important practical concern over whether behaviors in the widely-used ā€œtrust gameā€ actually measure trust, or instead reveal more about risk attitudes. It is critical to confront this question rigorously, as data from these games are increasingly used to support conclusions from a wide variety of fields including macroeconomic development, social psychology and cultural anthropology. The aim of this paper is to provide cogent evidence on the relationship between trust and risk in ā€œtrustā€ games. Subjects in our experiment participate either in a trust game or in its risk game counterpart. In the trust version, subjects play a standard trust game and know their counterparts are human. In the risk version, subjects know their counterparts are computers making random decisions. We compare decisions between these treatments, and also correlate behavior with subjectsā€™ risk attitudes as measured by the Holt and Laury (2002) risk instrument. We provide evidence that trusting behavior is different than behavior under risk. In particular, (i) decisions patterns in our trust and risk games are significantly different; and (ii) risk attitudes predict decisions in the risk game, but not the trust game.

    'Letting the children lead: The Jeely Nursery' - A second interim report for the Robertson Trust

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    This is the second interim report undertaken for the Robertson Trust of an ongoing project developed by the Jeely Nursery (JN) in Castlemilk, Glasgow, from 2007-10

    A review of the National Performance Framework in light of the Stiglitz Report recommendations

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    Contents: A review of the National Performance Framework in light of the Stiglitz Report recommendations -- Annex 1: A national performance framework (Chapter 8 of 'Scottish budget spending review 2007') -- Annex 2: The capabilities approach (reproducedĀ fromĀ SenĀ andĀ AlkireĀ inĀ theĀ StiglitzĀ Report,Ā p.Ā 151) -- Annex 3: The equality measurement frameworkThis report is based on the 'Report by the Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress' (Stiglitz Report, 2009) and 'More than GDP : measuring what matters' (2011).The aim of this paper is to review the structure of the Scottish National Performance Framework (NPF) against the 12 recommendations set out in the Stiglitz Report.Publisher PD
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