49,418 research outputs found

    Applying a Multidimensional Strategy to Mitigate Lateral Violence in a Small Rural Community Hospital in Western New York

    Get PDF
    Providing registered nurses with education and strategies to mitigate lateral violence is an evidenced-based method for creating a culture of civility. A descriptive pilot study with registered nurses was conducted on two medical/surgical units at a small rural community hospital. Strategies included a review of organizational policies, a one-day educational retreat for unit managers and registered nurse champions, and an online educational toolkit on lateral violence for the staff nurses on the pilot units

    Horizontal Violence Effect on Nurse Retention

    Get PDF
    Horizontal violence is known by a variety of terms such as lateral violence, bullying, and incivility. Christie and Jones (2014) describe lateral violence as a problem in nursing where a behavior is demonstrated through harmful actions that occur between nurses. Studies have revealed how horizontal violence affects nurse retention. Horizontal violence is a relevant issue in the healthcare community, yet often goes undiscussed. Walrafen (2012) explains that an outcome of horizontal violence in nursing is directly proportional to a decrease in retention of nurses. Sherman (2012) proclaimed that nurses who are subjected to horizontal violence have low self-esteem, depression, excessive sick leave, and poor morale. As Wilson (2011) identified nurses, who witness or experience horizontal violence have an increased desire to leave the organization where the bullying takes place. Horizontal violence is a pervasive source of occupational stress with physical, psychological, and organizational consequences (Hauge, et al, 2010). Roy (2007) describes this as an unkind, discourteous manner in which nurses relate to their colleagues. As nurses seek to perform their daily tasks, other co-workers may embarrass them for their lack of knowledge, tease them as they participate in informal cliques, or demean them for their technique (Bakker, 2012). Creating excuses, taunting, and refusing to share information, nursing education or knowledge are examples of horizontal violence (Ball, 1996)

    The Effects of Education and Training on Nurses\u27 Perception of Lateral Violence in the Healthcare Field

    Get PDF
    The effects of lateral violence are costly for all aspects of the healthcare profession. Lateral violence is an act of aggression directed towards another nurse. Educating nurses of lateral violence and its appearance may prove to increase nurse\u27s perception of lateral violence therefore decreasing its occurrence. This study will explore the effects of education and training on nurses\u27 perception of lateral violence in the healthcare field. Lateral violence threatens the integrity of each nurse, the nursing profession, and the organization. Increasing the awareness of lateral violence attempts to make a culture change among nurses in the healthcare profession. Minimizing lateral violence can restore the value in the nursing profession that it once obtained

    A Cognitive Rehearsal Based Educational Intervention for Healthcare Staff to Decrease Workplace Lateral Violence

    Get PDF
    Abstract PURPOSE: To determine if an education-based intervention will afford staff the tools needed to handle lateral violence situations, and consequently feel more comfortable and willing to handle situations when they arise. METHODS: Surveys evaluating comfort level, willingness, barriers, and approach to lateral violence were completed by participant’s pre and post workshop, and thirty-days post workshop. SITE AND PARTICIPANTS: The study was conducted within a community hospital in central Virginia. The study consisted of 30 employees, either RN, LPN, or patient care technician. All hospital employees who met the job role inclusion criteria and were above age 18 were invite to participate. INTERVENTION: The intervention for the study was an in-person lateral violence workshop to evaluate the effectiveness of lateral violence education. The workshop taught to staff included didactic information regarding lateral violence (definition, prevalence, effects on staff) by use of power point, optional information experience sharing, and role play. DESIGN: Evaluation of the lateral violence workshop was conducted by use of a pre-experimental, one-group pre/posttest design. RESULTS: The study had a total of 30 participants. Knowledge of lateral violence was significantly higher following program participation (t = -4.163, p \u3c.001). Participants were more comfortable (t = -4.163, p \u3c.001) and were more willing to confront lateral violence (t = -4.208, p \u3c.001). SIGNIFICANCE: An increase in knowledge, willingness to confront lateral violence and comfort level with increasing lateral violence may decrease lateral violence in the workplace, leading to a safer work environment for both staff as well as patients

    Male Perspectives of Lateral Violence in Nursing

    Get PDF
    Lateral violence is an intentional and harmful behavior in the workplace by one employee against another. In nursing lateral violence has impacted the performance of nurses as well as patient care. Research suggests that lateral violence behaviors are still prevalent in the nursing workplace and that there have been few interventions to change these behaviors or address the power dynamics that cause them. Though most of the research on lateral violence has been conducted on female nurses, the population of male nurses is growing. Thus, the purpose of the study was to explore lateral violence in the workplace from the perspective of male nurses. A phenomenological approach with Marion Conti-O\u27Hare\u27s theory of the wounded healer as the theoretical framework was used to address the research question on male nurse perception of lateral violence in nursing. The data for this study were drawn from interviews of 10 male nurses who were recruited with criterion sampling. Exploratory questions and vignettes were used to gather participants\u27 responses. This allowed for larger themes and core ideas to establish codes. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The results of the study indicate that lateral violence is a problem in nursing and that there is a gender bias that perpetuates this phenomenon. Results of this study have the potential to contribute to positive social change regarding male perception of lateral violence in nursing by encouraging interventions for lateral violence based on communication differences between genders

    Lateral Violence among New Graduate Nurses

    Get PDF
    Lateral violence is an act of aggression that is committed against one nurse by another. There are many names for lateral violence, some of these include: horizontal violence, bullying, aggression, horizontal hostility, verbal abuse, or nurses eating their young. Lateral violence occurs when nurses covertly or overtly direct the dissatisfaction they are feeling inward toward each other. The effects of lateral violence on new graduate nurses and the organizations in which they work can be detrimental. An extensive literature review was undertaken to understand the significance and prevalence of lateral violence against new graduate nurses. The purpose of this study is to determine if new graduate nurses continue to experience the negative acts of lateral violence. Registered nurses who have been in the profession for one year or less were invited to participate in the survey. The Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) was used as the measurement tool. This study used descriptive analysis to summarize and show the relationship between the quantitative data. One hundred and sixty survey invitations were sent out electronically through the email of the research facility. Thirty five surveys were completed for a response rate of 22%. This research study showed that lateral violence has decreased for new graduate nurses in the facility in which it was conducted. There is however, lateral violence that continues to occur

    Lateral Violence: An Education Module

    Get PDF
    Nursing is a very diverse, fast-paced, and demanding profession. The aspects of perioperative nursing are further influenced by the multidisciplined professions that take part in the team-focused approach to patient care. One facet that grossly affects the team approach to patient care in the perioperative setting is lateral violence. The focus of this project is to develop an education module to address lateral violence in the perioperative setting, Travelbee\u27s human-to-human relationship theory provides the framework for this project. Additional topics examined are basic concepts of lateral violence and the ramifications on the patient and nursing professionals. Information revealed in the literature review includes identification of lateral violence, skills for verbally addressing perpetrators of lateral violence, implications for nursing practice and leadership, and evaluation are addressed in this project

    The art of Emotional Intelligence: Decreasing Lateral Violence Among Nurses

    Get PDF
    Nurses work in stressful and complex work environments and, unfortunately, can be subjected to lateral violence. Lateral violence is described as repetitive actions and behaviors of verbal and emotional abuse or acts of incivility from one nurse(s) to another on equal levels of the organizational structure; the behaviors are meant to threaten, harm, or intimidate. Nurses will not stay in an environment that is negative, hostile, and demoralizing; lateral violence can decrease nursing retention rates and increase turnover and job dissatisfaction. Nurses leaving the profession contributing to shortages, poor patient outcomes, and safety concerns. Enhancing nurses’ emotional intelligence may assist as a strategy against lateral violence. Emotional intelligence is the ability to recognize, manage, and control one’s emotions and predict and perceive another’s emotions. This project educates 14 ambulatory nurses on a general medical care unit at a Midwest academic tertiary medical center on lateral violence and the skill sets of emotional intelligence. As a transformational nurse manager, guided by Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring, including the concept of self-awareness and Caritas consciousness, four educational sessions were designed. These sessions included recognizing lateral violence, cultivating self-awareness, practicing empathy, and listening, and communicating assertively with conflict resolution as a catalyst to address and mitigate lateral violence in this workplace

    An Exploration of Social Capital among Nurses in the Ambulatory Setting

    Get PDF
    Bullying and lateral violence are a sadly, common phenomena among nurses. While this issue has been examined within the inpatient, acute setting, it has not been widely researched in the ambulatory setting. This concept is usually looked at from a negative standpoint, looking at the levels of lateral violence. The purpose of this research study was done to explore the levels of social capital, also known as positive peer support, among nurses in the ambulatory setting. The participants of the study were 39 registered nurses from a public health department and an embedded care management department. The tool used was an 18 question survey that was evaluated on a 5 point Likert scale. The results were generally positive showing that the nurses had trust and confidence in their organization, management, and coworkers, but there were also several statistically significant results that showed difference in experience levels of the nurses and their responses and also differences between work location and their responses

    Perceptions of Nurses’ Abilities to Provide Safe Care in Unhealthy Work Environments

    Get PDF
    As many as 90% of nurses report working in an environment where their peers engage in passively and overtly violent activities against other nurses. Working in such an environment is unhealthy and has consequences for the career trajectory of nursing. There is a lack of literature available that specifically addresses nurses’ perceptions of their abilities to provide safe patient care in unhealthy work environments. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of nurses who have experienced lateral violence and their perceptions of their ability to provide safe care. Husserl’s philosophy of phenomenology was used as the conceptual framework and Freire’s theory of pedagogical oppression and empowerment was used as the theoretical framework of this study. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 13 registered nurses who experienced lateral violence. I then analyzed verbatim transcriptions of the interviews using manual coding. Categorization of data into 5 themes was accomplished utilizing interpretative phenomenological analysis. The themes included lateral violence, responses to lateral violence, oppressive group behavior, unsafe care, and coping. Recommendations based on this research included acknowledging that lateral violence is often present in the workplace, taking a clear stand against it, supporting the victim by directly confronting the perpetrator, and providing support services to the victim. Results from this study can be used to promote positive social change by informing nurses of the dangers of lateral violence and by encouraging a change of culture in work environments where nurses support each other. In doing so, nurses may be better equipped to address patient needs and provide safe car
    • …
    corecore