1,360,250 research outputs found

    Toward a social compact for digital privacy and security

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    Executive summary The Global Commission on Internet Governance (GCIG) was established in January 2014 to articulate and advance a strategic vision for the future of Internet governance. In recent deliberations, the Commission discussed the potential for a damaging erosion of trust in the absence of a broad social agreement on norms for digital privacy and security. The Commission considers that, for the Internet to remain a global engine of social and economic progress that reflects the world’s cultural diversity, confidence must be restored in the Internet because trust is eroding. The Internet should be open, freely available to all, secure and safe. The Commission thus agrees that all stakeholders must collaborate together to adopt norms for responsible behaviour on the Internet. On the occasion of the April 2015 Global Conference on Cyberspace meeting in The Hague, the Commission calls on the global community to build a new social compact between citizens and their elected representatives, the judiciary, law enforcement and intelligence agencies, business, civil society and the Internet technical community, with the goal of restoring trust and enhancing confidence in the Internet. It is now essential that governments, collaborating with all other stakeholders, take steps to build confidence that the right to privacy of all people is respected on the Internet. It is essential at the same time to ensure the rule of law is upheld. The two goals are not exclusive; indeed, they are mutually reinforcing. Individuals and businesses must be protected both from the misuse of the Internet by terrorists, cyber criminal groups and the overreach of governments and businesses that collect and use private data. A social compact must be built on a shared commitment by all stakeholders in developed and less developed countries to take concrete action in their own jurisdictions to build trust and confidence in the Internet. A commitment to the concept of collaborative security and to privacy must replace lengthy and over-politicized negotiations and conferences

    Sustaining Arts and Culture in Buffalo Niagara

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    Like all nonprofits, arts and culture organizations are not immune to the inevitable shifts in fiscal health due to trends in the region’s economy and in charitable giving. In recent years, however, the shifts have turned sharply downward due to budget crises for one of the industry’s most important supporters – local government. With cherished arts and cultural assets in Erie and Niagara Counties struggling to make ends meet, the region is suddenly forced to confront a series of provocative questions. With increasingly limited resources, how can the region sustain an industry integral to Buffalo Niagara’s economy and quality of life? Can the region fill this gap while providing a higher degree of funding predictability? If not, how will it be determined which organizations are left to falter? If so, whose responsibility is it to bridge the fiscal chasm – the public sector, the private sector, the cultural institutions themselves, or all of the above

    The security implications of geoengineering:blame,imposed agreement and the security of critical infrastructure

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    The prospect of solar geoengineering in response to climate change (on the basis of its supposedly significantly lower cost and/or more rapid impact on global temperature than carbon reduction strategies) raises a number of security concerns that have traditionally been understood within a standard Geo-political framing of security. This relates to unrealistic direct application in inter-State warfare or to a securitization of climate change. However, indirect security implications are potentially significant. Current capability, security threats and international law loopholes suggest the military, rather than scientists would undertake geoengineering, and solar radiation management (SRM) in particular. SRM activity would be covered by Critical National Infrastructure policies, and as such would require a significant level of secondary security infrastructure. Concerns about termination effects, the need to impose international policy agreement 4 (given the ability of 'rogue States' to disrupt SRM and existing difficulties in producing global agreement on climate policy), and a world of extreme weather events, where weather is engineered and hence blameworthy rather than natural, suggest these costs would be large. Evidence on how blame is attributed suggest blame for extreme weather events may be directed towards more technologically advanced nations, (such as the USA) even if they are not engaged in geoengineering. From a security perspective SRM is costly, ungovernable, and raises security concerns of a sufficient magnitude to make it a non-viable policy option

    Will solar radiation management enhance global security in a changing climate?

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    Citizenship

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    The turn of the century has witnessed the beginning of a new era in international politics. What are the implications for citizenship, an institution that, like few others, defines who we are and how we organise political life? This issue of Schlossplatz³ provides a snapshot of the ongoing debate on the past and future of citizenship

    The future of labour

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    The world of labour has undergone tremendous changes throughout the last years. Globalisation, de-industrialisation and the constant change of labour environments are posing challenges to labour markets. Schlossplatz3 discusses a number of these challenges and will show different angles of how "The Future of Labour" can be incorporated in policy discourse and policy-making

    Progressive governance and globalisation

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    Jean Pisani-Ferry discusses the development of globalisation during the last decade and the challenges ahead. The speed and magnitude of the transformation affecting the world economy are larger than initially envisaged, while domestic policy reforms and redistribution have often been insufficient to cope with this adjustment challenge. Against this background, the definition of a renewed agenda that builds on the success of the initial one should be a priority for progressive governments. This paper was presented at the Progressive Governance Summit 2008.

    Cities

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    The editorial team of Schlossplatz³ has regrouped and now includes a number of MPP students from the new class of 2009. For the fourth issue of the student magazine of the Hertie School of Governance, the new team has focused on urban governance as the central topic
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