7,930,069 research outputs found

    The Elementary Persuasive Letter: Two Cases Of Situated Competence, Strategy, And Agency

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    Research on persuasive writing by elementary children posits primarily a developmental perspective, claiming that elementary-age children can effectively argue through talk but not through writing. While this view is commonly held, this article presents counterevidence. Drawing on two cases of third and fourth grade children writing persuasive letters gathered during six-month naturalistic studies of literacy practices and social identities in contrastive communities (one urban, one suburban), these data challenge the developmental generalization by showing that children in these settings can write persuasively. Further, this work complicates understandings of children\u27s persuasive writing by showing how assignments and local cultures shape children\u27s writing. Evidence is developed through rich description of the case study settings and instructional tasks, a typology of the children\u27s persuasive strategies, and a critical discourse analysis of the children\u27s persuasive letters. This study suggests that children in both communities are capable of persuasive writing, although they enact different patterns of response, drawing on locally learned discourses. The settings, the hybridity of the persuasive letter as both argument and letter, and the children\u27s habitus may account for some of the differences in how the children address the tasks through ranges of centeredness and agentive strategies. Differing patterns of response suggest new frames for viewing and fostering children\u27s argumentative competence in a range of settings, including understandings of agency. The author encourages a research agenda that accounts for socially situated classroom and community practices, and argues for ongoing research and critique of the power and place of persuasive writing for children in a range of schools

    Casting And Recasting Gender: Children Constituting Social Identities Through Literacy Practices

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    Considers how gender, identity and literacy are entangled and mutually constitutive. Concludes that social experience, desire, proximate others, and the ways in which children can draw upon these in the classroom are aspects of the situated condition that deserve more prominence in literacy and identity research

    Toward Digital, Critical, Participatory Action Research: Lessons From The #BarrioEdProj

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    The Education in our Barrios project, or #BarrioEdProj, is a digital critical participatory action research (D+CPAR) project that examines the interconnected remaking of public education and a New York City Latino core community in an era of racial capitalism. This article is a meditation on the ongoing development of #BarrioEdProj as an example of strategically coupling digital media with the theories and practices of critical participatory action research (CPAR). The author describes the project and the theoretical and political commitments that frame this project as a form of public and participatory science. The author then discusses some of the lessons that have been learned as the research group implemented the project and decided to move to a digital archiving model when our digital media design was initially ineffective. The author argues that rather than dropping digital media, engaged scholars must continue to explore the potentially transformative work that can come from carefully devised D+CPAR

    Developmental Psychology And Instruction: Issues From And For Practice

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    Further Notes On Teaching In The Time Of #Ferguson

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    Constructing a Model of ppbv of Surface Ozone

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    The purpose of this activity is to construct a model that will provide students with a visual representation of parts per billion. Students work in teams to construct cubes of different volumes and to compare them to get a feel for parts per million by volume and parts per billion by volume. The intended outcome is that students gain a feeling for the small quantities of gases, such as ozone, present in the Earth's atmosphere. Educational levels: Middle school, High school

    Introduction To Part 2 Of A Symposium On Teachers As Leaders: Teachers Write Now: Collaborating, Writing, And Acting On Teacher Leadership

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    This introduction to the second part of our Symposium on Teachers as Leaders examines the role of collaboration and writing as part of teacher leadership. The first part of the symposium described teacher leadership as a stance that values professionalism and the intellectual, political, and collaborative work of teaching. This introduction explores how a group of teacher leaders who have met regularly during the past several years have used writing to reflect on practice, to share ideas with one another, and to communicate their perspectives to others

    Do Individual Interests Make A Difference?

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    Reading Salt and Pepper : Social Practices, Unfinished Narratives, And Critical Interpretations

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    Symposium Introduction: Stepping Into Their Power: The Development Of A Teacher Leadership Stance

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    This introduction to the symposium on Teacher Leadership describes how a group of teachers have developed a definition of teacher leadership as a stance. The article explores how prior definitions of teacher leadership tend to focus on individual skills or roles. Neoliberal educational policies that emphasize market-based policy, privatization, individual effort and benefit, and efficiency have contributed to these task-oriented definitions of teacher leadership. The teacher leaders who participate in this project resist this framing and explore teacher leadership as a stance that values professionalism and the intellectual, political, and collaborative work of teaching
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