573 research outputs found

    Enhancing Creativity in Interaction Design: Alternative Design Brief

    Get PDF
    This paper offers a critique of the design brief as it is currently used in teaching interaction design and proposes an alternative way of developing it. Such a design brief requires the exploration of alternative application domains for an already developed technology. The paper presents a case study where such a novel type of design brief has been offered to the students taking part in a collaborative design project and discusses how it supported divergent thinking and creativity as well as helped enhancing the learning objectives

    Exploring the Design Space

    Get PDF

    Using Frustration in the Design of Adaptive Videogames

    Get PDF
    In efforts to attract a wider audience, videogames are beginning to incorporate adaptive gameplay mechanics. Unlike the more traditional videogame, adaptive games can cater the gaming experience to the individual user and not just a particular group of users as with the former. Affective videogames, games that respond to the user's emotional state, may hold the key to creating such gameplay mechanics. In this paper we discus how the emotion frustration may be used in the design of adaptive videogames and the ongoing research into its detection and measurement

    Artefact Ecologies: Supporting Embodied Meeting Practices with Distance Access

    Get PDF
    Frameworks such as activity theory, distributed cognition and structuration theory, amongst others, have shown that detailed study of contextual settings where users work (or live) can help the design of interactive systems. However, these frameworks do not adequately focus on accounting for the materiality (and embodiment) of the contextual settings. Within the IST-EU funded AMIDA project (Augmented Multiparty Interaction with Distance Access) we are looking into supporting meeting practices with distance access. Meetings are inherently embodied in everyday work life and that material artefacts associated with meeting practices play a critical role in their formation. Our eventual goal is to develop a deeper understanding of the dynamic and embodied nature of meeting practices and designing technologies to support these. In this paper we introduce the notion of "artefact ecologies" as a conceptual base for understanding embodied meeting practices with distance access. Artefact ecologies refer to a system consisting of different digital and physical artefacts, people, their work practices and values and lays emphasis on the role artefacts play in embodiment, work coordination and supporting remote awareness. In the end we layout our plans for designing technologies for supporting embodied meeting practices within the AMIDA project. \u

    Affective Videogames and Modes of Affective Gaming: Assist Me, Challenge Me, Emote Me

    Get PDF
    In this paper we describe the fundamentals of affective gaming from a physiological point of view, covering some of the origins of the genre, how affective videogames operate and current conceptual and technological capabilities. We ground this overview of the ongoing research by taking an in-depth look at one of our own early biofeedback-based affective games. Based on our analysis of existing videogames and our own experience with affective videogames, we propose a new approach to game design based on several high-level design heuristics: assist me, challenge me and emote me (ACE), a series of gameplay "tweaks" made possible through affective videogames

    Evaluating research assessment: metrics-based analysis exposes implicit bias in REF2014 results

    Get PDF
    The recent UK research assessment exercise, REF2014, attempted to be as fair and transparent as possible. However, Alan Dix, a member of the computing sub-panel, reports how a post-hoc analysis of public domain REF data reveals substantial implicit and emergent bias in terms of discipline sub-areas (theoretical vs applied), institutions (Russell Group vs post-1992), and gender. While metrics are generally recognised as flawed, our human processes may be uniformly worse

    Validity

    Get PDF

    To err is AI

    Get PDF
    In this work, we analyze the different contexts in which one chooses to integrate artificial intelligence into an interface and the implications of this choice in managing user interaction. While AI in systems can provide significant benefits, it is not infallible and can make errors that seriously affect users. We aim to understand how to design more robust human-AI systems so that these initial AI errors do not lead to more catastrophic failures. To prevent failures, it is essential to detect errors as early as possible and have clear mechanisms to repair them. However, detecting errors in AI systems can be challenging. Therefore, we examine various approaches to error detection and repair, including post-hoc estimation, the use of traces and ambiguity, and multiple sensor layers

    Truth in an Age of Information

    Get PDF
    Many of the issues in the modern world are complex and multifaceted: migration, banking, not to mention climate change and Covid. Furthermore, social-media, which at first seemed to offer more reliable 'on the ground' citizen journalism, has instead become a seedbed of dis-information. Trust in media has plummeted, just when it has become essential. This is a problem, but also an opportunity for research in HCI that can make a real difference in the world. The majority of work in this area, from various disciplines including datascience, AI and HCI, is focused on combatting misinformation - fighting back against bad actors. However, we should also think about doing better - helping good actors to curate, disseminate and comprehend information better. There is exciting work in this area, but much still to do
    corecore