32 research outputs found

    Robotics in General Surgery

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    How I do it: Pedal access and pedal loop revascularization for patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia

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    An increasing proportion of patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia are older and have multiple comorbidities, including diabetes and renal failure. For those who are not candidates for a surgical bypass, this set of patients presents a challenge to vascular surgeons and interventionalists owing to the complex below-the-knee and increasingly below-the-ankle disease pattern that can fail traditional approaches for endovascular intervention. Two techniques, the retrograde pedal access and the pedal-plantar loop technique, can be useful in these settings and in skilled hands can be used safely, with a high technical success rate. In patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia who are not candidates for a single-segment saphenous vein bypass, the retrograde pedal access technique can be used not only in the setting of failed antegrade treatment, but also primarily when faced with a difficult groin or as an adjunct during a planned antegrade-retrograde intervention. The pedal plantar loop technique allows for retrograde access to tibial vessels without retrograde vessel puncture and additionally offers the ability to treat the pedal-plantar arch, which may have added benefit in wound healing. We describe the tips and tricks for these two techniques used in our limb salvage practice

    Aortic Diameter Varies in Trauma Patients: A Function of Hemodynamic Status

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    Controversies and evidence for cardiovascular disease in the diverse Hispanic population

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    ¬© 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery Objective: Hispanics account for approximately 17% of the U.S. population. They are one of the fastest growing racial/ethnic groups, second only to Asians. This heterogeneous population has diverse socioeconomic conditions, making the prevention, diagnosis, and management of vascular disease difficult. This paper discusses the cultural, racial, and social aspects of the Hispanic community in the United States and assesses how they affect vascular disease within this population. Furthermore, it explores risk factors, medical and surgical treatments, and outcomes of vascular disease in the Hispanic population; generational evolution of these conditions; and the phenomenon called the Hispanic paradox. Methods: A systematic search of the literature was performed to identify all English-language publications from 1991 to 2014 using PubMed, which draws from the National Institutes of Health and U.S. National Library of Medicine, with the words ‚Äúcardiovascular disease,‚ÄĚ ‚Äúprevalence,‚ÄĚ ‚Äúvascular,‚ÄĚ and ‚ÄúHispanic.‚ÄĚ An additional search was performed using ‚Äúcardiovascular disease and Mexico,‚ÄĚ ‚Äúcardiovascular disease and Cuba,‚ÄĚ ‚Äúcardiovascular disease and Puerto Rico,‚ÄĚ and ‚Äúcardiovascular disease and Latin America‚ÄĚ as well as for complications, management, outcomes, surgery, vascular disease, and Hispanic paradox. The resulting publications were queried for generational data (spanning multiple well-defined age groups) regarding cardiovascular disease, and cross-references were obtained from their bibliographies. Results are segmented by country of origin. Results: Compared with non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics face higher risks of cardiovascular diseases because of a high prevalence of high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic stroke. However, the incidence of peripheral arterial disease and carotid disease appears to be significantly lower than in whites. The Hispanic paradox (lower mortality in spite of higher cardiovascular risk factors) may relate to challenges in ascribing life expectancy and cause of death in this diverse population. Low socioeconomic status and high prevalence of concomitant diseases negatively influence the outcomes of all patients, independent of being Hispanic. Conclusions: Understanding the cultural diversity in Hispanics is important in terms of targeting preventive measures to modify cardiovascular risk factors, which affect development and outcomes of vascular disease. The available literature regarding vascular disease in the Hispanic population is limited, and further longitudinal study is warranted to improve health care delivery and outcomes in this group

    Controversies and evidence for cardiovascular disease in the diverse Hispanic population

    No full text
    ¬© 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery Objective: Hispanics account for approximately 17% of the U.S. population. They are one of the fastest growing racial/ethnic groups, second only to Asians. This heterogeneous population has diverse socioeconomic conditions, making the prevention, diagnosis, and management of vascular disease difficult. This paper discusses the cultural, racial, and social aspects of the Hispanic community in the United States and assesses how they affect vascular disease within this population. Furthermore, it explores risk factors, medical and surgical treatments, and outcomes of vascular disease in the Hispanic population; generational evolution of these conditions; and the phenomenon called the Hispanic paradox. Methods: A systematic search of the literature was performed to identify all English-language publications from 1991 to 2014 using PubMed, which draws from the National Institutes of Health and U.S. National Library of Medicine, with the words ‚Äúcardiovascular disease,‚ÄĚ ‚Äúprevalence,‚ÄĚ ‚Äúvascular,‚ÄĚ and ‚ÄúHispanic.‚ÄĚ An additional search was performed using ‚Äúcardiovascular disease and Mexico,‚ÄĚ ‚Äúcardiovascular disease and Cuba,‚ÄĚ ‚Äúcardiovascular disease and Puerto Rico,‚ÄĚ and ‚Äúcardiovascular disease and Latin America‚ÄĚ as well as for complications, management, outcomes, surgery, vascular disease, and Hispanic paradox. The resulting publications were queried for generational data (spanning multiple well-defined age groups) regarding cardiovascular disease, and cross-references were obtained from their bibliographies. Results are segmented by country of origin. Results: Compared with non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics face higher risks of cardiovascular diseases because of a high prevalence of high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic stroke. However, the incidence of peripheral arterial disease and carotid disease appears to be significantly lower than in whites. The Hispanic paradox (lower mortality in spite of higher cardiovascular risk factors) may relate to challenges in ascribing life expectancy and cause of death in this diverse population. Low socioeconomic status and high prevalence of concomitant diseases negatively influence the outcomes of all patients, independent of being Hispanic. Conclusions: Understanding the cultural diversity in Hispanics is important in terms of targeting preventive measures to modify cardiovascular risk factors, which affect development and outcomes of vascular disease. The available literature regarding vascular disease in the Hispanic population is limited, and further longitudinal study is warranted to improve health care delivery and outcomes in this group
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