13 research outputs found

    Globalization with Labor Market Frictions and Non-Scale Growth

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    We analyze the interaction between globalization and labor market frictions in a dynamic general equilibrium North-South non-scale growth model with endogenous Northern innovation and endogenous Southern imitation. The employment, growth and relative-wage effects of globalization are shown to depend qualitatively on the degree of Northern labor market frictions. We demonstrate that Northern countries with particular severe labor market frictions benefit from globalization in terms of employment and growth. We also analyze whether stricter intellectual property rights protection in the South, rising R&D subsidies in the North or an increase in Northern labor market flexibility alleviate or aggravate globalization effects.Globalization, Quality-Ladder Model, Non-Scale Growth, Frictional Unemployment, Firing Costs

    Globalization, Labor Market Rigidities and Multiple Equilibria

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    This paper analyses the effects of globalization, stricter intellectual property rights protection and different labor market policies in a dynamic North-South general equilibrium model with non-scale growth. To this aim, we generalize the Schumpeterian product-lifecycle model of Dinopoulos and Segerstrtom (2003) by adding frictional unemployment and firing costs to their framework. We find that the effects on North-South wage inequality, employment and growth depend qualitatively on the level of Northern firing costs. Contrary to the special case of perfect labor market flexibility studied by Dinopoulos and Segerstrom, globalization may not benefit anymore both the South in terms of a relative-wage catch up and the North in terms of a temporary innovation and growth push.Economic Growth, North-South Trade, Globalization, Frictional Unemployment, Firing Costs

    The Conundrum of Recovery Policies: Growth or Jobs?

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    This paper adopts a Neo-Schumpeterian approach to macroeconomics, by proposing a model which includes fully-endogenous growth, involuntary search-based unemployment, and financial frictions. The model analyzes the effects of several recovery policies used by governments to fight unemployment or/and enhance growth. Employment protection legislation reduces growth and unemployment. Policies that reduce the cost of job vacancies decrease unemployment and raise growth. Industrial policies in the form of production subsidies to young small firms, production taxes to adult large firms, and R&D subsidies increase growth and unemployment. Policies that reduce financial frictions accelerate growth but exert an ambiguous effect on unemployment.fully- endogenous growth, Schumpeterian unemployment, financial frictions, recovery policies, vacancy creation

    Can Countries with Severe Labor Market Frictions Gain from Globalization?

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    The interaction between increased Southern trade integration (globalization) and labor market frictions is analyzed in a dynamic general-equilibrium North-South nonscale growth model with endogenous Northern innovation and endogenous Southern imitation. The qualitative employment, growth, and relative-wage effects of globalization are shown to depend crucially on the degree of Northern labor market frictions. I demonstrate that only Northern countries with particularly large labor market adjustment costs for both firms and workers benefit from globalization in terms of permanently lower unemployment, temporarily faster growth, and permanently higher wages. This is because of the resulting general-equilibrium feedback effects of Northern labor market frictions that deter Southern imitation incentives. The result does not imply the recommendation to increase Northern labor market rigidities, but it challenges the common belief that labor market flexibility helps Northern countries to better adjust to the "globalization threat" coming from the South. Copyright � 2009 The Author. Journal compilation � 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

    Globalization with labor market frictions and non-scale growth

    No full text
    We analyze the interaction between globalization and labor market frictions in a dynamic general equilibrium North-South non-scale growth model with endogenous Northern innovation and endogenous Southern imitation. The employment, growth and relative-wage effects of globalization are shown to depend qualitatively on the degree of Northern labor market frictions. We demonstrate that Northern countries with particular severe labor market frictions benefit from globalization in terms of employment and growth. We also analyze whether stricter intellectual property rights protection in the South, rising R&D subsidies in the North or an increase in Northern labor market flexibility alleviate or aggravate globalization effects.Globalization , Quality-Ladder Model , Non-Scale Growth , Frictional Unemployment , Firing Costs

    Globalization with labor market frictions and non-scale growth

    No full text
    We analyze the interaction between globalization and labor market frictions in a dynamic general equilibrium North-South non-scale growth model with endogenous Northern innovation and endogenous Southern imitation. The employment, growth and relative-wage effects of globalization are shown to depend qualitatively on the degree of Northern labor market frictions. We demonstrate that Northern countries with particular severe labor market frictions benefit from globalization in terms of employment and growth. We also analyze whether stricter intellectual property rights protection in the South, rising R&D subsidies in the North or an increase in Northern labor market flexibility alleviate or aggravate globalization effects

    Schumpeterian Growth, North-South Trade and Wage Rigidity

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    This paper presents a two-country non-scale Schumpeterian endogenous growth model with interindustry North-South trade and wage rigidity in the North. Its purpose is to analyze the effects of a compression of the wage structure and an increase in unemployment benefits on Northern unskilled unemployment and growth. Both innovation and skill acquisition rates are endogenously determined. We show how the two labor market policies differ with respect to education incentives in a general equilibrium with balanced trade. We further highlight the relevance of North-South trade and incomplete Northern specialization for the labor market effects that we obtain in our model. We demonstrate that the growth effects of a compression of the Northern wage structure depend decisively on the specific formulation of rising R&D difficulty.

    Globalization, rent protection institutions, and going alone in freeing trade

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    We construct a two-country North South Product-cycle model of trade with endogenous growth and trade barriers. We remove the scale effects on growth by incorporating rent protection activities by Northern incumbents. We examine the effects of two forms of globalization an expansion of the relative size of the South and unilateral trade liberalization by either country. We find that the location of rent protection institutions and the sectoral trade structure determine whether or not globalization raises steady-state economic growth. We demonstrate that for accelerating worldwide economic growth, contrary to conventional wisdom, unilateral Northern trade liberalization is preferable to bilateral trade liberalization

    North-South Trade, Unemployment and Growth : What’s the Role of Labor Unions?

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    We construct a North-South product-cycle model of trade with fully-endogenous growth in which both countries experience unemployment due to union wage bargaining. We find that unilateral Northern trade liberalization reduces growth and increases unemployment in both countries, while unilateral Southern trade liberalization has the opposite effects. We show that the existence of labor unions matters for trade liberalization to have any effect on Northern innovation and worldwide growth. For empirically plausible parameter values, bilateral trade liberalization by equal amounts increases growth and reduces unemployment in both countries. Stronger Northern labor unions hurt both countries by reducing growth and increasing unemployment. However, stronger Southern labor unions exert a positive growth effect for both countries, while decreasing Northern unemployment and increasing Southern unemployment

    Globalization, rent protection institutions, and going alone in freeing trade

    No full text
    We construct a two-country North-South Product-cycle model of trade with endogenous growth and trade barriers. We remove the scale effects on growth by incorporating rent protection activities by Northern incumbents. We examine the effects of two forms of globalization - an expansion of the relative size of the South and unilateral trade liberalization by either country. We find that the location of rent protection institutions and the sectoral trade structure determine whether or not globalization raises steady-state economic growth. We demonstrate that for accelerating worldwide economic growth, contrary to conventional wisdom, unilateral Northern trade liberalization is preferable to bilateral trade liberalization.Globalization Innovation Imitation Product cycle Endogenous growth
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