19 research outputs found

    Multi-frequency segmental bio-impedance device:design, development and applications

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    Bio-impedance analysis (BIA) provides a rapid, non-invasive technique for body composition estimation. BIA offers a convenient alternative to standard techniques such as MRI, CT scan or DEXA scan for selected types of body composition analysis. The accuracy of BIA is limited because it is an indirect method of composition analysis. It relies on linear relationships between measured impedance and morphological parameters such as height and weight to derive estimates. To overcome these underlying limitations of BIA, a multi-frequency segmental bio-impedance device was constructed through a series of iterative enhancements and improvements of existing BIA instrumentation. Key features of the design included an easy to construct current-source and compact PCB design. The final device was trialled with 22 human volunteers and measured impedance was compared against body composition estimates obtained by DEXA scan. This enabled the development of newer techniques to make BIA predictions. To add a ‘visual aspect’ to BIA, volunteers were scanned in 3D using an inexpensive scattered light gadget (Xbox Kinect controller) and 3D volumes of their limbs were compared with BIA measurements to further improve BIA predictions. A three-stage digital filtering scheme was also implemented to enable extraction of heart-rate data from recorded bio-electrical signals. Additionally modifications have been introduced to measure change in bio-impedance with motion, this could be adapted to further improve accuracy and veracity for limb composition analysis. The findings in this thesis aim to give new direction to the prediction of body composition using BIA. The design development and refinement applied to BIA in this research programme suggest new opportunities to enhance the accuracy and clinical utility of BIA for the prediction of body composition analysis. In particular, the use of bio-impedance to predict limb volumes which would provide an additional metric for body composition measurement and help distinguish between fat and muscle content

    Wideband Characterization of Equatorial Ionospheric Fading Using MUOS Signals

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    The DUNE Far Detector Vertical Drift Technology, Technical Design Report

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    International audienceDUNE is an international experiment dedicated to addressing some of the questions at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics, including the mystifying preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe. The dual-site experiment will employ an intense neutrino beam focused on a near and a far detector as it aims to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to make high-precision measurements of the PMNS matrix parameters, including the CP-violating phase. It will also stand ready to observe supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector implements liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) technology, and combines the many tens-of-kiloton fiducial mass necessary for rare event searches with the sub-centimeter spatial resolution required to image those events with high precision. The addition of a photon detection system enhances physics capabilities for all DUNE physics drivers and opens prospects for further physics explorations. Given its size, the far detector will be implemented as a set of modules, with LArTPC designs that differ from one another as newer technologies arise. In the vertical drift LArTPC design, a horizontal cathode bisects the detector, creating two stacked drift volumes in which ionization charges drift towards anodes at either the top or bottom. The anodes are composed of perforated PCB layers with conductive strips, enabling reconstruction in 3D. Light-trap-style photon detection modules are placed both on the cryostat's side walls and on the central cathode where they are optically powered. This Technical Design Report describes in detail the technical implementations of each subsystem of this LArTPC that, together with the other far detector modules and the near detector, will enable DUNE to achieve its physics goals

    DUNE Offline Computing Conceptual Design Report

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    This document describes Offline Software and Computing for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) experiment, in particular, the conceptual design of the offline computing needed to accomplish its physics goals. Our emphasis in this document is the development of the computing infrastructure needed to acquire, catalog, reconstruct, simulate and analyze the data from the DUNE experiment and its prototypes. In this effort, we concentrate on developing the tools and systems thatfacilitate the development and deployment of advanced algorithms. Rather than prescribing particular algorithms, our goal is to provide resources that are flexible and accessible enough to support creative software solutions as HEP computing evolves and to provide computing that achieves the physics goals of the DUNE experiment

    DUNE Offline Computing Conceptual Design Report

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    This document describes Offline Software and Computing for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) experiment, in particular, the conceptual design of the offline computing needed to accomplish its physics goals. Our emphasis in this document is the development of the computing infrastructure needed to acquire, catalog, reconstruct, simulate and analyze the data from the DUNE experiment and its prototypes. In this effort, we concentrate on developing the tools and systems thatfacilitate the development and deployment of advanced algorithms. Rather than prescribing particular algorithms, our goal is to provide resources that are flexible and accessible enough to support creative software solutions as HEP computing evolves and to provide computing that achieves the physics goals of the DUNE experiment