22 research outputs found

    The Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detectors for LHCb

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    The success of the LHCb experiment depends heavily on particle identification over the momentum 2-100 GeV/c. To meet this challenge, LHCb uses a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system composed of two detectors with three radiators. RICH1 has both aerogel and gas (C4_4F10_{10}) radiators, while RICH2 has only a gas (CF4_4) radiator. The design of RICH1 is almost complete, whereas RICH2 has been constructed and installed (Nov 2005). Novel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) have been developed in collaboration with industry to detect the Cherenkov photons. A silicon pixel detector bump-bonded to a readout chip is encapsulated in a vacuum tube. A bi-alkali photocathode is deposited on the inside of the quartz entrance window to convert photons in the range 200-600 nm. The pixel chip is manufactured in 0.25 Ό\mum deep-submicron radiation-tolerant technology and consists of 1024 logical pixels, each pixel having an area of 0.5 mm x 05. Mm. Photo-electrons are accelerated by a 20kV potential, resulting in a signal of typically 5000 electrons that is amplified and digitized at the LHC speed of 40 MHz. The HPDs are enclosed in iron shielding and Mumetal cylinders surround the individual detectors to protect them from magnetic fields within the external shielding of up to 50 mT. The mass production of a total of 484 HPDs required for the two RICH detectors has already commenced. The design and current status of the LHCb RICH system will be reviewed. Results obtained using prototype HPDs to detect Cherenkov light in particle test beams using the full LHCb readout chain will be presented. Finally, the expected performance of the LHCb RICH system, obtained from realistic simulation, will be shown

    LHCb Upgraded RICH 1 Engineering Design Review Report

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    During the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC, the LHCb collaboration will replace the upstream Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH 1). The magnetic shield of the current RICH 1 will be modified, new spherical and plane mirrors will be installed and a new gas enclosure will be manufactured. New photon detectors (multianode photomultiplier tubes) will be used and these, together with their readout electronics, require a new mechanical support system. This document describes the new optical arrangement of RICH 1, its engineering design, installation and alignment. A summary of the project schedule and institute responsibilities is provided

    The LHCb RICH Upgrade for the LHC Run 3

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    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume I Introduction to DUNE

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    International audienceThe preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay—these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. This TDR is intended to justify the technical choices for the far detector that flow down from the high-level physics goals through requirements at all levels of the Project. Volume I contains an executive summary that introduces the DUNE science program, the far detector and the strategy for its modular designs, and the organization and management of the Project. The remainder of Volume I provides more detail on the science program that drives the choice of detector technologies and on the technologies themselves. It also introduces the designs for the DUNE near detector and the DUNE computing model, for which DUNE is planning design reports. Volume II of this TDR describes DUNE's physics program in detail. Volume III describes the technical coordination required for the far detector design, construction, installation, and integration, and its organizational structure. Volume IV describes the single-phase far detector technology. A planned Volume V will describe the dual-phase technology

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume II: DUNE Physics

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    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay -- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. DUNE is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. Volume II of this TDR, DUNE Physics, describes the array of identified scientific opportunities and key goals. Crucially, we also report our best current understanding of the capability of DUNE to realize these goals, along with the detailed arguments and investigations on which this understanding is based. This TDR volume documents the scientific basis underlying the conception and design of the LBNF/DUNE experimental configurations. As a result, the description of DUNE's experimental capabilities constitutes the bulk of the document. Key linkages between requirements for successful execution of the physics program and primary specifications of the experimental configurations are drawn and summarized. This document also serves a wider purpose as a statement on the scientific potential of DUNE as a central component within a global program of frontier theoretical and experimental particle physics research. Thus, the presentation also aims to serve as a resource for the particle physics community at large

    Reconstruction of interactions in the ProtoDUNE-SP detector with Pandora

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    International audienceThe Pandora Software Development Kit and algorithm libraries provide pattern-recognition logic essential to the reconstruction of particle interactions in liquid argon time projection chamber detectors. Pandora is the primary event reconstruction software used at ProtoDUNE-SP, a prototype for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment far detector. ProtoDUNE-SP, located at CERN, is exposed to a charged-particle test beam. This paper gives an overview of the Pandora reconstruction algorithms and how they have been tailored for use at ProtoDUNE-SP. In complex events with numerous cosmic-ray and beam background particles, the simulated reconstruction and identification efficiency for triggered test-beam particles is above 80% for the majority of particle type and beam momentum combinations. Specifically, simulated 1 GeV/cc charged pions and protons are correctly reconstructed and identified with efficiencies of 86.1±0.6\pm0.6% and 84.1±0.6\pm0.6%, respectively. The efficiencies measured for test-beam data are shown to be within 5% of those predicted by the simulation
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