19 research outputs found

    Lichens of the Innvika Bay, Prins Oscars Land (Nordaustlandet, Svalbard)

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    The paper presents a list of lichens for the Innvika Bay, which includes 157 lichenized and 2 lichenicolous fungi. Alectoria gowardii and Peltigera elisabethae are new to Svalbard. Furthermore, 36 other species were found new to Nordaustlandet. Twenty-seven species are rare on Svalbard, among them Aspilidea myrinii, Candelariella borealis, Gyalecta erythrozona, Miriquidica deusta, Rhizocarpon viridiatrum (reported for the second time), and Aspicilia cinerea, Cetraria nigricans, Cladonia arbuscula, Cystocoleus ebeneus, Lecidea ecrustacea, Peltigera frippii, Rhizocarpon eupetraeoides, Rinodina terrestris, Stereocaulon cumulatum, Toninia squalida, Verrucaria hydrela. Localities, substrates and distribution in Svalbard are given for each species. For rare and extremely rare species, all known locations are given. For some species, differences from closely related species are given

    Addition to the lichen biota of Franz Josef Land archipelago

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    Forty-four new lichen species and one lichenicolous fungus have been identified as a result of studies of the lichen biota of the Franz Josef Land archipelago. Bryocaulon hyperboreum was reported for the first time from Russia. Gyalecta hypoleuca and Umbilicaria maculata were first identified in the Arctic. Arctocetraria andrejevii, Brodoa oroarctica, Candelariella borealis, Cercidospora stereocaulorum, Massalongia carnosa, Miriquidica nigroleprosa, M. plumbeoatra, Myriolecis zosterae var. palanderi and Polyblastia gothica are new to the Arkhangelsk Region; and Arthrorhaphis citrinella, Mycoblastus alpinus, Racodium rupestre, Rhizocarpon ferax, Scytinium intermedium, Stereocaulon glareosum are new to the Arctic part of the Arkhangelsk Region. Species new to Arkhangelsk Region, Arctic and Russia are supplied with information on distribution in neighboring regions and world and on differences from closely related species. The checklist of the Franz Josef Land archipelago thus includes 277 species and 6 varieties of lichenized and 43 lichenicolous fungi to date

    Flora of lichens, mosses and liverworts of Wrangel Island: New records

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    New records to lichen flora and bryoflora of Wrangel Island are presented. The additions to the island cryptogam flora include 32 lichens and one lichenicolous fungus, 26 mosses and eleven liverwort species. Acarospora sinopica, Alectoria gowardii, Austroplaca sibirica, Calogaya bryochrysion, Hymenelia ceracea, Porpidia ochrolemma, and Sagiolechia protuberans are new to the island and to the Russian Far East. Two lichen species (Lecidea lithophila and Rinodina terrestris), as well as two liverwort taxa (Clevea hyaline, Lophoziopsis excisa var. elegans and Pseudolophozia debiliformis), are new to the Chukotka Autonomous Area. Two of the reported moss species (Funaria arctica and Schistidium umbrosum) are extremely rare. Location data and ecological descriptions for the newly reported species are included

    Lichens of the Frankenhalvøya Peninsula (Northern of Barentsøya, Svalbard)

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    This paper contributes to the studies on the lichen diversity of Barentsøya. It covers 211 species, of which four ( Buellia schaereri, Myriolecis zosterae var. palanderi, Rhizocarpon furfurosum, R. leptolepis) are reported for the first time for the Svalbard archipelago. Additionally, 84 of the species are reported for the first time for Barensøya. Our study includes 2 subspecies as well, both new for Barentsøya. Thirty-six species (16.8% among the identified species) are rare in Svalbard, whereas more than two thirds (70.1% from identified in the Barensøya) are relatively widespread species in Svalbard and the Arctic

    New records of lichens and allied fungi from the Leningrad Region, Russia. XI

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    Twelve lichen species and two lichenicolous fungi, of them seven that belong to Micarea prasina group, are reported for the first time for St. Petersburg or the whole Leningrad Region. The lichenicolous fungus Intralichen baccisporus is new to Russia, and the lichen Micarea nowakii – for European Russia. A comparative table of characteristics for seven species of Micarea prasina group is presented

    The lichens of Pukhtolova Gora (St. Petersburg, Russia)

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    The lichen diversity of the proposed protected area Pukhtolova Gora counts 252 species, including 232 lichenized, 12 lichenicolous, and 8 non-lichenized saprobic fungi. Micarea laeta, M. pusilla, and Pyrenidium actinellum s. lat. are new to North-Western European Russia; Parmelia serrana, Rhizocarpon cinereovirens, and Stereocaulon taeniarum are new to St. Petersburg. Altogether 13 species recorded in the study area are red-listed in St. Petersburg, with two of them known only from historical collections. Pukhtolova Gora is an area with a high conservation value; the lichen biota of this area is one of the richest within the city limits due to the well-preserved forest habitats

    Three new species of crustose Teloschistaceae in Siberia and the Far East

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    Three species of the family Teloschistaceae (lichenized Ascomycota) are described as new to science from Southern and Eastern Siberia and the Far East. Corticolous Caloplaca saviczii belongs to the genus Caloplaca s. str.; it has C. cerina-like apothecia and green to grey-green, crateriform soralia with a white rim. Lendemeriella aureopruinosa is a saxicolous taxon with a thin grey thallus and small apothecia 0.3-0.6 mm in diameter, with a dark orange disc usually bearing epipsamma and often with a grey true exciple containing the pigment Cinereorufa-green. Orientophila infirma is a corticolous species with an endophloeodal thallus and small orange apothecia, 0.2-0.3 mm in diameter, usually with an inconspicuous thalline exciple. All new taxa presumably have a boreal north-eastern distribution in Asia

    New and rare lichens and allied fungi from Arkhangelsk region, North-West Russia

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    Thirty-one lichen-forming fungi, 12 lichenicolous fungi, and 5 non-lichenized fungi are reported as new for Arkhangelsk Region; 7 species are new for its mainland area. Micarea fallax is reported for the first time for Russia; M. laeta and M. pusilla are new for the European part of Russia. The second finding of Nicropuncta rugulosa for Russia is recorded; microconidia are first observed in this species. The records of ten species which have been included in the new edition of the Red Data Book of the Arkhangelsk Region (2020) are presented. Nephromopsis laureri from the Red Data Book of the Russian Federation (2008) and Leptogium rivulare from the IUCN Red List are reported for the first time for Arkhangelsk Region

    New national and regional bryophyte records, 63

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    Erkul, Karaman ( Aksaray, Yazar )Bucklandiella subsecunda (Harv.) Bedn.-Ochyra & Ochyra Contributor. R. Ochyra Madagascar. Diana Region, Tsaratanana Massif, 14° 01′ S, 48°56′ W, 1200–2400 m a.s.l., April 1924, leg. Perrier de la Bathe s.n. (H-Brotherus, JE-Herzog, PCP.de la Varde 0707821, PC-Thériot 0708099). Racomitrium Brid., in its traditional circumscription is poorly represented in the moss flora of Madagascar and hitherto only one specimen of this genus has been discovered on this fourth largest island in the world. It was collected in 1924 by Perrier de la Bathie on the Tsaratanana Massif, and Thériot (1926) reported it as an unnamed form of Racomitrium lepervanchei Besch., a species endemic to Réunion Island. As Racomitrium proved to be heterogeneous, it was split into six segregates (Ochyra, Żarnowiec et al. 2003; Bednarek-Ochyra, Ochyra, Sawicki et al. 2014; Bednarek-Ochyra, Sawicki, Ochyra, et al. 2015; Sawicki et al. 2015), R. lepervanchei was placed in the genus Bucklandiella Roiv. Nevertheless, the voucher specimen was not studied by De Sloover (1977) in his survey of African Racomitrium and this material was assigned either to R. crispulum (Hook.f. & Wilson) Wilson (Crosby et al. 1983) or Bucklandiella membranacea (Mitt.) Bedn.-Ochyra & Ochyra (Marline et al. 2012), as R. lepervanchei was considered to be conspecific with these species (Clifford 1955; Lawton 1973). The specimen from the Tsaratanana Massif has distinct auricles and broad, flattened costa with 6–8 enlarged ventral guide cells, which are typical of Bucklandiella subsecunda. This is a pantropical oreophyte, widespread in tropical and subtropical Asia (Frisvoll 1988), subSaharan Africa (Bednarek-Ochyra and Ochyra 2012a, 2013; Ochyra and van Rooy 2013), Central and South America (Bednarek-Ochyra et al. 1999; Bednarek-Ochyra and Ochyra 2012b; Ellis, Bakalin et al. 2013) and the maritime Antarctic (Ochyra, Lewis Smith et al. 2008)

    The lichens of the northern shore of the Gulf of Finland in the limits of St. Petersburg, Russia – diversity on the edge of the megapolis

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    We present a lichen checklist for the northern shore of the Gulf of Finland in the limits of St. Petersburg, Russia. This area has diverse lichen biota within the city limits, and has been comprehensively studied since 1893, which gives a good base for analysis of historical changes in lichen diversity. The documented lichen biota comprises 469 species (430 lichenized, 24 lichenicolous, 3 facultatively lichenicolous, and 12 non-lichenized saprobic fungi), of them 191 species are known from herbaria and literature for the period before 1991, and 436 species were recorded since 1991 to 2019. Thirty-three taxa were excluded from the lichen list of the study area as erroneous or dubious records. Altogether 48 species are new to St. Petersburg, including: Lecidea malmeana and Micarea czarnotae – new to Russia; Caloplaca lucifuga, Gyalecta nigricans, Micarea soralifera – new to European Russia; Agonimia flabelliformis, Endococcus verrucosus, Lecania turicensis, Micarea fallax, M. tomentosa, Xanthomendoza huculica – new to Northwestern European Russia; Lichenoconium lichenicola, Ramalina europaea, Sarcogyne hypophaea – not known also from the Leningrad Region. The studied lichen biota is moderately rich compared to other city territories. The history of economic development of the region has caused its serious transformation, degradation of natural habitats and therefore partial loss of lichen diversity. At the same time, human-made substrates and anthropogenic plant communities are inhabited by lichens, including species unknown in the natural habitats of the study area. However, 44 species recorded in the study area are red-listed in St. Petersburg, with 13 of them known only from historical collections. Forest communities, as well as historical parks, in NW part of St. Petersburg are important source of biodiversity on regional level nowadays and hopefully in future, and deserve protection
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