7,748 research outputs found

    Talking Back: Lay Theologians Create a Whole New Climate

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    Disability Employment in the Hospitality Industry: Human Resources Considerations

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    [Excerpt] The characteristics of the hospitality industry are extremely dynamic and differ from other industries. In the United States and many other parts of the world, the predominant industry is transitioning from manufacturing to service. The hospitality industry is growing—the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the hospitality industry to add 17% in wage and salary employment, compared to the 14% for all other industries combined. The nature of the hospitality industry makes it very labor intensive. Additionally, the hospitality industry has extremely high employee turnover rates. While the annual turnover rate for all industry sectors was 39.6% the leisure and hospitality sectors averaged 74.6%

    Learning from Doing: Using Analysis of Fertilizer Demonstration Plots to Improve Programs for Stimulating Fertilizer Demand in Rwanda

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    Food Security Research Project (FSRP) and Division of Agricultural Statistics (DSA) Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Forestry MINAGRIfood security, food policy, Rwanda, fertilizer, Crop Production/Industries, Q18,

    The implementation of discrete demand management algorithms within energy systems modelling

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    Traditionally, demand side management (DSM) programs have been driven by utilities. With the prospect of growth in the utilization of building-integrated micro-generation, DSM offers opportunities for additional energy savings and CO2 emission reductions through better utilisation of local renewable energy resources. This paper examines the feasibility of using discreet demand management (DDM) to improve the supply/demand match. For many combinations of micro-generation and DDM controls, it is necessary to know the environmental conditions (i.e. temperatures and lighting levels) within the buildings being modelled. One method would be to embed all the renewable energy technologies and DDM algorithms within a detailed simulation program. An alternative method, investigated in this study, involves coupling two existing tools: a dynamic building simulation program (ESP-r) and a demand/supply matching program (MERIT) that incorporates DDM algorithms and renewable energy system technologies. These two programs interact at the time-step level and exchange calculated parameters (relating to loads, supply potentials and prevailing environmental conditions) to enable an evaluation of DDM techniques in terms of energy saving and occupant impact. This paper describes the technique and presents simulation results relating to a number of building cases

    Covid-19 Journal

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    A personal reflection upon the changes faced by a Longwood student, and a member of society.https://digitalcommons.longwood.edu/covid19/1019/thumbnail.jp

    Viewing the Chromosphere of the Sun in the Near Infrared Spectrum

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    The outermost layer of the sun, the chromosphere, cannot normally be seen due to the overwhelming brightness of the photosphere, the layer beneath it. However, in certain wavelengths of light, the chromosphere outshines the photosphere, meaning it can be seen when these wavelengths are selected for. One such wavelength of light is in the near infrared spectrum, centered around 670 nm. When the infrared filters are removed from regular cameras, they are able to see far enough into the infrared spectrum to detect light of these wavelengths. Unfortunately, the atmosphere absorbs most incoming radiation in the near infrared spectrum, meaning that one cannot measure light coming from the chromosphere from the ground. Instead, I affixed two cameras to a balloon, which was flown to 60,000 feet in elevation, high enough that the atmosphere no longer absorbed significant amounts of near infrared light. One camera took images in the visible spectrum, while the other filter out all light except that in the near infrared spectrum. Consequently, one camera took “normal” pictures of the sun while the other took pictures of the chromosphere of the sun. By comparing the images, the most apparent difference between them was in a phenomenon known as “limb darkening,” which is the effect where the edges of a star look darker than the center. This is caused by the light seen emanating from the center of a star being emitted from deeper within the star, where it is hotter and consequently brighter. While the visible-spectrum images displayed this effect in full, the near infrared images did not, as they were only viewing one layer of the sun

    2023 Community Bank Case Study Competition

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    We studied a community bank in Danville, Arkansas named Chambers Bank. This was part of a 2023 Community Bank Case Study Competition, which illustrated the financial analysis, staffing, and training of the bank. We learned about technology implemented into the bank, and how the bank works with customers locally to ensure the best quality care
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