771 research outputs found

    Plan Now for Managing Electronic Data and Avoid Tomorrow’s Legal Risks

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    [Excerpt] In a world where the use of electronic data is rapidly increasing, companies must find ways to manage data now so that they effectively control compliance risks. The proliferation of electronic data is both astonishing and overwhelming. Given the storage power of average computers today, even the most modest mom-and-pop business may have electronic storage capacity equivalent to 2,000 four-drawer file cabinets. The task of managing electronic data is further compounded by the fact that the data is no longer just tangible pieces of paper, but rather are bytes of information that are constantly being edited, changed, and updated from different people and sources. Proper archiving, retention, monitoring, filtering, and encryption of electronic data are no longer optional: they are imperative

    The Geochemical Trends of Major and Select Trace Elements through a Soil Profile Near Mt. Daisen, Japan

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    After a catastrophic 9.0 magnitude earthquake struck the east coast of Japan in April 2011, a chain of events was set in motion leading to the release of several volatile radionuclides of Cs and I into the atmosphere due to explosions in three of the six reactor cores at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). This study shows the enrichment of stable Cs relative to other alkali metals at the surface soil samples collected from a 1m thick andisol at Mt. Daisen, Japan, roughly 700 Km SW from the FDNPP. Cs is not enriched in three surface soils collected from the Fukushima Prefecture outside the restricted area. The relative enrichment of Cs compared to other alkali metals show the potential of long-term fixation of radiocesium in these Mt. Daisen soils

    Teachers\u27 Perceptions of Multimodal Literacies in Middle School Health Literacy Programs

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    Health literacy, defined as the ability to understand and use health information to make informed decisions, is critical to maintaining health; however, not all U.S. states mandate strategies to improve adolescents\u27 health literacy. Moreover, many middle school teachers are often unaware of how their roles could improve the health literacy of their students. Multimodal literacies help students to create meaning through viewing print-based resources and using digital technologies. The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers\u27 perceptions of the effectiveness of multimodal literacies on adolescents\u27 overall health literacy via the introduction of health literacy programs into the curriculum. This qualitative research data were gathered, analyzed, and categorized using unstructured narrative interviews and the research was guided by the socioecological model. A phenomenological approach was used to conduct in-depth interviews with 6 middle school teachers. These interviews yielded 4 common themes: efficacy of multimodal literacy, health literacy, blending cultures, and responsibility. The results suggested that (a) multimodal literacies with adolescent literacy components can be used in the middle school curriculum, and that (b) these literacies can help inform policy changes. Understanding teachers\u27 perceptions about multimodal literacy could help to improve adolescent health literacy in the middle school system. Positive social change could occur if school systems understand the utility of incorporating adolescent health literacy in the present curriculum. Doing so could help reduce future health care costs and improve the future health of students

    Primary care-based educational interventions to decrease risk factors for metabolic syndrome for adults with major psychotic and/or affective disorders: A systematic review

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    Background Individuals with major psychotic and/or affective disorders are at increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome due to lifestyle- and treatment-related factors. Numerous pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have been tested in inpatient and outpatient mental health settings to decrease these risk factors. This review focuses on primary care-based non-pharmacological (educational or behavioral) interventions to decrease metabolic syndrome risk factors in adults with major psychotic and/or affective disorders. Methods The authors conducted database searches of PsychINFO, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, as well as manual searches and gray literature searches to identify included studies. Results The authors were unable to identify any studies meeting a priori inclusion criteria because there were no primary care-based studies. Conclusions This review was unable to demonstrate effectiveness of educational interventions in primary care. Interventions to decrease metabolic syndrome risk have been demonstrated to be effective in mental health and other outpatient settings. The prevalence of mental illness in primary care settings warrants similar interventions to improve health outcomes for this population

    Comparison of Macronutrient Loss from Human Milk Based onTube Feeding Method in the NICU Population: A Pilot Study

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    https://digitalcommons.psjhealth.org/stvincent-bootcamp/1008/thumbnail.jp

    Student Voices: Recording the First-Generation Student Experience

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    In this session, an English instructor, digital initiatives librarian, and archivist will discuss an interdepartmental collaboration that integrates a digital story-telling project into first-generation undergraduate instruction. They will talk about the project goals, lesson plan, and learning outcomes; procedures for placing student-created oral histories in the digital repository; student reactions to the project; and lessons learned. This project focuses on first-generation students, a population that is growing at colleges and universities across the nation and receiving increased attention in the library and archives literature. At the University of Northern Colorado (UNC), approximately 40% of the undergraduate population is classified as first-generation. These students represent one of the most diverse populations on campus; many are minorities and/or come from underprivileged backgrounds. To enhance the success and retention of these students, the Center for Human Enrichment (CHE) program provides support through instruction, tutoring, and academic advising. First-year CHE participants follow a specialized curriculum of cohort courses, including College Composition and Introduction to Library Research, which are either taught or supported by faculty at UNC Libraries. The existing relationship between CHE and the Libraries has been strengthened in recent years by the development of the Student Voices project, an innovative collaboration that captures oral histories documenting the first-generation freshman experience and makes them available via the Libraries’ digital repository. The goal of the project is twofold: to document the perspectives and experiences of first-generation students, which have been largely absent within the university historical record, while simultaneously delivering instruction in primary sources and archival practice. The project is delivered as a classroom assignment, with the resulting oral history recordings collected by the UNC Archives and Special Collections and placed in the digital repository. Faculty from the UNC Libraries co-present a guest lecture to the CHE College Composition cohort classes, touching on such topics as the purpose of archives, digitization and copyright, and best practices for creating oral histories. Replicating the Story Corps model, students then interview each other in groups of two or three as part of an out-of-class assignment. They are asked to discuss topics such as their first impressions of campus, experiences adjusting to university life, and their expectations for college in addition to the expectations that others may have for them. Along with engaging with classmates to create a meaningful and substantive video or audio oral history, students learn to navigate technical issues of recording and submitting a digital file. While several substantive oral interviews have resulted from this project, it has not been without challenges. First–generation freshmen have unique needs, and challenges arose due to the presenter’s expectations about their experience and prior knowledge. The session will offer a case study that covers both digital initiatives in undergraduate instruction and interdisciplinary collaboration between campus units. Speakers will explore issues of teaching, engaging, and incorporating digital initiative concepts into first-generation education. Attendees will receive ideas for implementing similar collaborations at their institutions

    Student Voices: Recording the First-Generation Experience

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    In this session, an English instructor, digital initiatives librarian, and archivist at the University of Northern Colorado (UNC) will discuss an inter-departmental collaboration that integrates a digital story-telling project into undergraduate instruction. This project focuses on first-generation students, a population that is growing at colleges and universities across the nation. At UNC, approximately 40% of the undergraduate population is classified as first-generation. The UNC Libraries has partnered with the Center for Human Enrichment, which provides support for first-generation students through instruction, tutoring, and advising, to develop the Student Voices project. This innovative collaboration captures oral histories documenting the first-generation freshman experience and makes them available via the Libraries’ digital repository. The goal of the project is twofold: to document the perspectives and experiences of first-generation students, which have been largely absent within the university historical record, while simultaneously delivering instruction in primary sources and archives. The project is delivered as a classroom assignment, with the resulting student-recorded oral histories collected by the UNC Archives and Special Collections and placed in the digital repository. The session will offer a case study that covers both digital initiatives in undergraduate instruction and interdisciplinary collaboration between campus units. The presenters will explore issues of teaching, engaging, and incorporating digital initiative concepts into undergraduate education and will talk about the project goals, lesson plan, learning outcomes, technical aspects, and lessons learned. Attendees will receive ideas for implementing similar collaborations at their institutions

    What, how, who: Developing Mathematical Discourse

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    A collaborative classroom, an open-ended problem, and a what-how-who structure can build students’ reasoning skills and allow teachers to recognize all classroom contributions. With an increased focus on using social discourse to enhance students’ mathematical thinking and reasoning (NCTM 2014, Staples and King 2017), teachers are looking for discussion strategies that encourage middlelevel students to make sense of mathematical concepts. However, structuring these valuable discussions is complex. “Mathematical discourse should build on and honor student thinking, and provide students with opportunities to share ideas, clarify understandings, develop convincing arguments, and advance the mathematical learning of the entire class” (Smith, Steele, and Raith 2017, p. 123). In other words, teachers must carefully consider what tasks provide meaningful opportunities to explore ideas, generate hypotheses, and promote questions within a collaborative environment. Then, teachers need to consider how to structure the activity to encourage discussions and incorporate responses that contribute to understanding specific mathematical objectives. Additionally, teachers must select who will speak to “advance the mathematical storyline of the lesson” (NCTM 2014, p. 30). By intentionally focusing on these elements in mathematics instruction, middle-grades teachers can develop a classroom culture that not only emphasizes sense making but also values the intellectual capacity that students bring to the classroom (Gutiérrez 2013; Lemons-Smith 2008). In this article, we describe how teachers can promote meaningful discussions using the what-how-who structure while giving students opportunities to make sense of mathematical ideas within a social context

    Maths Games: A Universal Design approach to mathematical reasoning

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    By incorporating math games into the classroom, through the principles of Universal Design teachers are able to address mathematical content, reasoning and problem solving, as well as tailoring games to address students\u27 individual needs
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