38 research outputs found

    Analysis of marketing systems on traditional bananas and plantains in Peru

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    Poster presented at Tropentag 2011 - Development on the Margin. Bonn (Germany), 3-7 Oct 2011

    The impact of organic bananas in Alto Beni, Bolivia

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    This Impact Brief reports on an assessment using an asset-based livelihoods approach and carried out in 2009, five years after the end of the project. Overall, about 85% of farm families in the region said their incomes had increased since the end of the project, and the community enterprise grew in terms of both sales and membership. The project clearly initiated and catalyzed the developments that resulted in these outcomes. The impact assessment also identified elements that could be used to strengthen any future similar projects; a greater ongoing investment in the community enterprise, particularly in social and human capital, and decentralization to meet farmers’ preferred methods of working are two examples

    Dietary diversity and nutrition status of preschool children from banana dependent households in Gitega (Burundi) and Butembo (Democratic Republic of Congo)

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    A cross-sectional survey was carried out in Gitega health zone (Burundi) and Butembo health zone (Democratic Republic of Congo, DRC) with the objective of establishing dietary diversity and nutritional status of pre-school children from rural-banana dependent households. The two health zones were selected based on high dependency on bananas and plantains and the high levels of food insecurity. Through multi-stage random sampling commune/collectivity, colline/localite and villages were selected from each of the health zones; household listing was done in each of the sub-sites and systematic random sampling used to select 281 households with pre-school children (Butembo- 138 and Gitega- 143). Findings showed that 48% and 42% of the children from Butembo (DRC) and Gitega (Burundi) respectively had consumed food items from less than 3 food groups. Only 7% and 29% of children from Butembo (DRC) and Gitega (Burundi), respectively had consumed highly diversified diets (>6 food groups). The other popular food groups were; vegetables group, cereals and grains group in Gitega (Burundi) and vegetables group and legumes group in Butembo (DRC). In both countries less than 15% of the preschool children consumed food from meat, eggs or milk groups

    The impact of the Musa International Transit Centre

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    This brief presents the findings of a study published in 2010 that documented and assessed the performance of the International Transit Centre for Musa germplasm (ITC) in terms of the conservation and distribution of Musa germplasm. It also analysed the costs of ITC operations, including possible future developments

    From technology adoption to understanding innovation: lessons from plantain innovation systems in four countries

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    Plantain is an important staple food and cash crop in Latin America and West Africa with growing market demand. In recent decades, new production technologies and varieties have become available and are being tested in major producing countries. The purpose of the project ‚ÄėIntensification of plantain production in Latin America and West Africa‚ÄĚ which results are presented on this poster was 1) to identify determinants for successful technological change for intensification in plantain production and bottlenecks in the socio-economic and market context, and innovation and seed systems in Latin America and 2) analyze how these elements are relevant under conditions in West Africa, so as to contribute to intensification and off-season plantain production for West African smallholders

    Dietary Diversity And Nutritional Status Of Pre-School Children From Musa -Dependent Households In Gitega (Burundi) And Butembo (Democratic Republic Of Congo)

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    In sub-Saharan African countries, diets of pre-school children are predominantly based on starchy foods with little or no animal products and few fresh fruits and vegetables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in Gitega health zone (Burundi) and Butembo health zone (Democratic Republic of Congo‚ÄďDRC) with the objective of establishing dietary diversity and nutritional status of pre-school children from rural-banana dependent households. The two health zones were selected based on high dependency on bananas and plantains and the high levels of food insecurity. Through multi-stage random sampling commune/collectivity, colline/localite and villages were selected from each of the health zones; household listing was done in each of the sub-sites and systematic random sampling used to select 281 households with pre-school children (Butembo- 138 and Gitega- 143). Dietary diversity was assessed using the dietary diversity score (DDS) with a reference period of 24 hr. Anthropometric measurements were taken and Epi Info 2002 used to compute nutrition indices and results classified according to World Health Organization 2006 cut-off points. Findings showed that 48% and 42% of the children from Butembo (DRC) and Gitega (Burundi) respectively had consumed food items from less than 3 food groups. Only 7% and 29% of children from Butembo (DRC) and Gitega (Burundi), respectively had consumed highly diversified diets (>6 food groups). In both countries the most popular food group was the roots, tubers and bananas group (>75% consumption rate). The other popular food groups were; vegetables group, cereals and grains group in Gitega (Burundi) and vegetables group and legumes group in Butembo (DRC). In both countries less than 15% of the preschool children consumed food from meat, eggs or milk groups. Stunting was the most prevalent form of malnutrition with 63.57% and 78.86% of the preschool children from Gitega and Butembo, respectively being stunted (z-scores of ‚ȧ-2), while 20% and 3.25% of children from Gitega and Burundi, respectively were wasted. The differences in levels of underweight and stunting among children from Gitega and Butembo were not statistically significant but the differences in wasting were significantly different at a P<0.05. With the high levels of malnutrition and low dietary diversity observed among rural-Musa-dependent households in Gitega and Butembo, it is important that stakeholders work collaboratively in coming up with sustainable integrated approaches that link agriculture, nutrition and health in order to enhance the livelihoods of these communities
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