987 research outputs found

    Extent and Distribution of Urban Tax Delinquency

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    Purpose – Work-place learning takes place in many settings and in different ways, resulting in knowledge and skills of different kinds. The recognition process in the work place is however often implicit and seldom discussed in terms of recognition of prior learning (RPL). The aim of this paper is to give examples of how the knowledge/skills of employees get recognition in the workplace and to discuss what the consequences of such recognition processes might be. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on a study in two companies and two municipalities, where 21 interviews were conducted with human resource managers, team leaders and union representatives. The research questions concerned the ways skills were recognised among employees and how the logics of these actions could be understood. Findings – The findings show that both companies and municipalities have their own ways of assessing knowledge/skills, mostly out of a production logic of what is needed at the workplace. However, certain skills are also made “unvisualised” for the employee. This employer-controlled recognition logic is important to understand when RPL models are brought to the work place in order to obtain win-win situations for both employers and employees. Practical implications – It seems important to identify an already existing system for assessment of knowledge/skills at the workplace when bringing RPL processes to the workplace. Originality/value – The approach to understand assessment processes in these companies and municipalities from an RPL perspective has not been widely covered before

    Mutations in Domestic Animals Disrupting or Creating Pigmentation Patterns

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    The rich phenotypic diversity in coat and plumage color in domestic animals is primarily caused by direct selection on pigmentation phenotypes. Characteristic features are selection for viable alleles with no or only minor negative pleiotropic effects on other traits, and that alleles often evolve by accumulating several consecutive mutations in the same gene. This review provides examples of mutations that disrupt or create pigmentation patterns. White spotting patterns in domestic animals are often caused by mutations in KIT, microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF), or endothelin receptor B (EDNRB), impairing migration or survival of melanoblasts. Wild boar piglets are camouflage-colored and show a characteristic pattern of dark and light longitudinal stripes. This pattern is disrupted by mutations in Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), implying that a functional MC1R receptor is required for wild-type camouflage color in pigs. The great majority of pig breeds carry MC1R mutations disrupting wild-type color and different mutations causing dominant black color were independently selected in European and Asian domestic pigs. The European allele evolved into a new allele creating a pigmentation pattern, black spotting, after acquiring a second mutation. This second mutation, an insertion of two C nucleotides in a stretch of 6 Cs, is somatically unstable and creates black spots after the open reading frame has been restored by somatic mutations. In the horse, mutations located in an enhancer downstream of TBX3 disrupt the Dun pigmentation pattern present in wild equids, a camouflage color where pigmentation on the flanks is diluted. A fascinating example of the creation of a pigmentation pattern is Sex-linked barring in chicken which is caused by the combined effect of both regulatory and coding mutations affecting the function of CDKN2A, a tumor suppressor gene associated with familial forms of melanoma in human. These examples illustrate how evolution of pigmentation patterns in domestic animals constitutes a model for evolutionary change in natural populations

    DISCO - A Microcomputer Controller for Single-Input-Single-Output Systems

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    Implementation of a Real-Time Kernel

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    Compact TeX : Second edition

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    A PHOTOMETRIC STUDY OF PLUTO AND SATELLITES OF THE OUTER PLANETS

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    Thesis (Ph.D.) - Indiana University, Astronomy, 197

    Anvisningar för utförande av lokala fältförsök

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    vokKirjasto Aj-

    An Interactive MISO Regulator

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    Respiration rates of herring larvae at different salinities and effects of previous environmental history

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    Metabolic rates of early life history stages of marine fishes show considerable inter-individual differences and are highly influenced by extrinsic factors like temperature or food availability. Measuring oxygen uptake rates is a proxy for estimating metabolic rates. Still, the relationship between respiration rates and ambient or previous salinity conditions as well as parental and developmental acclimation to changes in salinity is largely unexplored. In the present study, we conducted experiments to investigate salinity effects on the routine metabolic rates (RMR) of euryhaline Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) larvae at three levels of salinity: low (6 psu), intermediate (16 psu) and high (35 psu) reflecting ecological relevant conditions for its populations in the Atlantic and Baltic Sea. The larvae originated from different genetic backgrounds and salinity adaptations to account for cross-generation effects on metabolic rates. Closed respirometry carried out over 24 h on individual fish larvae generally confirmed near isometric respiration rates at all salinity regimes, with rates being 15.4% higher at 6 psu and 7.5% higher at 35 psu compared to 16 psu conditions. However, transgenerational acclimation to different salinity regimes of parents had no effect on the salinity specific metabolic rates of their offspring. Our study demonstrates the ability of herring to cope with a wide range of salinity conditions, irrespective of parental environmental history and genetic origin. This phenotypic plasticity is considered to be one of the main contributing factors to the success of herring as a widely distributed fish species in the North Atlantic and adjacent waters.acceptedVersio

    A maximum entropy approach to the newsvendor problem with partial information

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    In this paper, we consider the newsvendor model under partial information, i.e., where the demand distribution D is partly unknown. We focus on the classical case where the retailer only knows the expectation and variance of D. The standard approach is then to determine the order quantity using conservative rules such as minimax regret or Scarf's rule. We compute instead the most likely demand distribution in the sense of maximum entropy. We then compare the performance of the maximum entropy approach with minimax regret and Scarf's rule on large samples of randomly drawn demand distributions. We show that the average performance of the maximum entropy approach is considerably better than either alternative, and more surprisingly, that it is in most cases a better hedge against bad results.Newsvendor model; entropy; partial information
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