25 research outputs found

    Highly-parallelized simulation of a pixelated LArTPC on a GPU

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    The rapid development of general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) is allowing the implementation of highly-parallelized Monte Carlo simulation chains for particle physics experiments. This technique is particularly suitable for the simulation of a pixelated charge readout for time projection chambers, given the large number of channels that this technology employs. Here we present the first implementation of a full microphysical simulator of a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) equipped with light readout and pixelated charge readout, developed for the DUNE Near Detector. The software is implemented with an end-to-end set of GPU-optimized algorithms. The algorithms have been written in Python and translated into CUDA kernels using Numba, a just-in-time compiler for a subset of Python and NumPy instructions. The GPU implementation achieves a speed up of four orders of magnitude compared with the equivalent CPU version. The simulation of the current induced on 10^3 pixels takes around 1 ms on the GPU, compared with approximately 10 s on the CPU. The results of the simulation are compared against data from a pixel-readout LArTPC prototype

    Proof of Concept of CLIC Final Focus Quadrupoles Stabilization

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    International audienceThe Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) [1] luminosity requires extremely low beam emittances. Therefore, high beam position stability is needed to provide cen-tral collisions of the opposing bunches. Since ground motion (GM) amplitudes are likely to be larger than the required tolerances, an Active Vibration Control (AVC) system is required to damp quadrupole motion to the desired value of 0.2 nm RMS at 4 Hz. This paper focuses on the vertical final focus quadrupoles (QD0, QF1) stabilization and demonstrates its feasibility. An AVC system to be installed under QD0 and QF1 has been developed and successfully tested at LAPP. Based on a dedicated homemade sensor with an ex-tremely low internal noise level of 0.05 nm at 4 Hz, it damps GM in the frequency range [3;70] Hz by up to 30 dB, leading to RMS values of approximately 0.25 nm at 4 Hz. Simulations based on GM measured in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experimental hall [2] show that with such a GM level, the specifications would only be achieved with a Passive Insulation (PI) system, which would filter ground motion starting at ~ 25 H

    Vibration Control Using a Dedicated Inertial Sensor

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    International audienceThe Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) project is right in the development phase. In this prospect, the main objective of the final focus stabilization is to succeed in damping ground motion vibration at the sub-nanometer scale to avoid any unwanted motion of the two last final focus magnets. Active vibration control using high-resolution industrial seismic sensors has already shown its limits in the desired range of attenuation [4-100] Hz. Hence, a dedicated inertial sensor has been designed, tuned to fit CLIC requirements. It doesn't contain any feedback or coil which would linearize its dynamic in its bandwidth [0.1-100] Hz, avoiding electrical noise or thermal noise, and when used for active control, enhancing its performances thanks to the internal resonance. An analytical modeling of the sensor dynamic behavior also shown experimentally gives a first internal resonance around 11 Hz. This paper is complemented by a comparative measurement with high precision industrial sensors. A noise level 2.5 times better (0.04 nm at 4 Hz) has been achieved. This sensor has also been tested in the context of vibration rejection with a sub-nanometer active vibration rejection support. Experimental results have been compared with the one obtained with the state-of-the-art industrial sensors. Vertical seismic motion attenuation results have shown unprecedented performances. A damping ratio of 8.5 has been achieved at 4 Hz, leading to an rms displacement of the support of 0.25 nm thanks to the active support prototype and the dedicated sensor

    Vibration Control Using a Dedicated Inertial Sensor

    No full text

    Highly-parallelized simulation of a pixelated LArTPC on a GPU

    No full text
    The rapid development of general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) is allowing the implementation of highly-parallelized Monte Carlo simulation chains for particle physics experiments. This technique is particularly suitable for the simulation of a pixelated charge readout for time projection chambers, given the large number of channels that this technology employs. Here we present the first implementation of a full microphysical simulator of a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) equipped with light readout and pixelated charge readout, developed for the DUNE Near Detector. The software is implemented with an end-to-end set of GPU-optimized algorithms. The algorithms have been written in Python and translated into CUDA kernels using Numba, a just-in-time compiler for a subset of Python and NumPy instructions. The GPU implementation achieves a speed up of four orders of magnitude compared with the equivalent CPU version. The simulation of the current induced on 10310^3 pixels takes around 1 ms on the GPU, compared with approximately 10 s on the CPU. The results of the simulation are compared against data from a pixel-readout LArTPC prototype
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