3,082,387 research outputs found

    A study into urban roadworks with shuttle-lane operation

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    In urban areas where roadworks are required, single lane shuttle operation is applied, especially where there is limited road space. There are operational problems relating to the site such as site geometry, visibility, length of roadworks zone, position of signs with other traffic control devices and signal timing. Other problems are mainly related to drivers’ behaviour and their compliance with traffic controls on site. The reduced road width caused by the works will interrupt the free flow of traffic and it can also add to the risks to road users. In addition, shuttle operation may introduce long queues and increase delays especially during peak periods. There is a need to identify those parameters and behaviours which might influence traffic performance in terms of safety and capacity. An investigation of four roadworks sites in urban roadworks within the Greater Manchester area was undertaken for this purpose. Parameters included in the examination were position of the STOP sign, signal timing, weather conditions, time headway, vehicle speed and percentages of heavy goods vehicles (HGV) in the traffic stream. Statistical analysis and comparisons between sites were conducted. Other factors related to the operation of the shuttle-lane were provided based on site observations

    National road safety action plan 2015–2017

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    The Action Plan outlined in this document is intended to support the implementation of the National Road Safety Strategy 2011–2020 (NRSS). It addresses key road safety challenges identified in a recent review of the strategy (NRSS Review) and details a range of priority national actions to be taken by governments over the three years 2015 to 2017. The Action Plan was developed cooperatively by Commonwealth, state and territory transport agencies, and was endorsed by Ministers of the Transport and Infrastructure Council in November 2014. It does not replace the broader 10-year agenda of the NRSS, but will help to ensure that national efforts in the next three years are focused on strategically important initiatives

    National remote and regional transport strategy: consultation draft

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    On 22 May 2014, the Northern Territory hosted the National Remote and Regional Transport Infrastructure and Services Forum in Alice Springs, attended by 120 industry, government and community representatives from all areas of Australia. Following the Forum, the Council agreed for the Northern Territory to lead the development of the National Remote and Regional Transport Strategy, in collaboration with the South Australia, Western Australia, Queensland and Commonwealth governments. The Strategy will propose specific actions to address issues faced in remote and regional areas in relation to transport infrastructure, services and regulation. On 22 May 2015, the Council approved the release of the draft Strategy for public consultation. As part of the consultation period, stakeholders are invited to provide feedback on the draft Strategy and its proposed actions. For more information on the Strategy, or to make a submission, please visit the following link: www.transport.nt.gov.au/nrrts. Please note the closing date for submissions is 5pm Friday 31 July 2015 (ACST). Transport – A Vital Role The availability and quality of transport infrastructure and services impacts on every part of our society and wellbeing. Good transport systems provide a platform for improving productivity and driving social and economic growth for all Australians. Remote and Regional Areas – Supporting all of Australia The remote and regional area of Australia covers 85 percent of the Australian land mass, however has only 15 percent of the Australian population. But significantly, this area is responsible for 40 percent of Australia\u27s GDP due to its considerable resource sector and primary industries. Transport Challenges Remote and regional areas face specific transport challenges which do not apply to the highly populated eastern seaboard of Australia – all influenced by vast distances, a small population, climatic extremes, and demanding geography. It is for this reason that a one size fits all approach to transport regulation and infrastructure and service delivery just doesn\u27t work for the remote and regional areas of Australia. The Need for a National Strategy The aim of the National Remote and Regional Transport Strategy is to provide some practical solutions to the issues and challenges faced by transport system providers and users so that this important area of Australia can continue to grow and contribute to Australia\u27s wellbeing. The Council will discuss the final Strategy and its implementation at its meeting in November 2015

    Under which conditions is carrier cooperation possible? A case study in a Seville marketplace

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    The high volume of traffic originates two well-known problems in many cities: congestion and pollution. In recent years, a social phenomenon is emerging cooperation. This work is aimed at evaluating the circumstances under which transport cooperation is possible between different stakeholders operating in the same geographical area. To this end, a double survey process was conducted in a marketplace situated in the Seville City (Spain) centre. The first survey was designed to know the characteristics of the retailers and their preferences with respect to cooperation and regulations. A relational analysis between retailer features and their willingness to cooperate was carried out. After analysing the motivations for non-cooperation, a mixed proposal was designed and surveyed. Although the research was limited to a marketplace, the relevant data gathered from this double survey process highlights some implications: (a) the importance of personal relations in retailer cooperation; (b) a high volume of freight and the use of vans as on-street warehouses appear as significant motivations for non-cooperation; (c) forcing changes in the statu quo encourages cooperation.Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (España) TEC2013-47286-C3-3-

    The attitudes and behaviour of adolescent road users : an application of the theory of planned behaviour

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    The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) was used as a framework to study the attitudes of adolescent road users towards four target behaviours: (1) cycle helmet use, (2) using nearby crossings, (3) crossing from between parked cars, and (4) challenging traffic. Four questionnaires, one for each of the behaviours, were designed based on pilot work. Each questionnaire contained items to measure the TPB variables, self-reported behaviour, and general exposure and demographic characteristics (e.g. age and gender). A total of 2,457 children aged 11-16 completed the questionnaires; 564 respondents completed the 'cycle helmet use' questionnaire; 657 respondents completed the 'using nearby crossings' questionnaire; 619 respondents completed the 'crossing from between parked cars' questionnaire; and 617 completed the 'challenging traffic' questionnaire. Multivariate analyses were conducted for each of the behaviours to explore how adolescents' attitudes, subjective norms, perceived control, behavioural intentions and self-reported behaviour differed as a function of demographic variables. Correlation and multiple regression analyses were then conducted to test the relationships in the TPB and to identify beliefs underpinning adolescents' attitudes that could be targeted in road safety interventions. This report describes all aspects of the study and discusses the theoretical and practical implications

    Adolescent road user behaviour : a survey of 11-16 year olds

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    This study was carried out to investigate the safety related behaviour of road users aged 11-16. A self-completion questionnaire was designed to measure the frequency with which children from the target population carry out 43 different road using behaviours and a number of other variables including children's beliefs about the safety of their own road using behaviour. Two thousand four hundred and thirty three children from eleven secondary schools within England completed the questionnaire in lesson time at school. Factor analysis showed that scores on the 43 behaviour items were best represented by a three-factor solution. The three factors were named unsafe road crossing behaviour, dangerous playing in the road, and planned protective behaviour. Analysis of variance and stepwise multiple regression analyses showed that demographic variables and exposure variables had statistically significant effects on how often these behaviours were carried out. More interesting was the finding that respondents had realistic perceptions of their own behaviour as road users. The more respondents believed their road using behaviour to be unsafe and irresponsible, the more often they reported carrying out road using behaviour that was undesirable from a road safety point of view. These results and their implications for road safety interventions and further research are discussed

    Transport

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    A community approach to road safety education using practical training methods : the Drumchapel project

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    Research shows that practical training methods, in which children receive guided experience of solving traffic problems in realistic traffic situations, are amongst the most effective in improving children's pedestrian competence. However, practical training is both time consuming and labour intensive, making it difficult to capitalise on the strengths of the method. The report describes a solution to this problem by adopting a community participation approach in which local volunteers carried out all roadside training, working in co-operation with schools and project staff. The project took place in an area of Glasgow known for its exceptionally high child pedestrian accident rate

    Travel Disruption: Three Case Studies

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    Six stages of travel disruption from travellers are identified from the survey data of peole affected by the volcanic ash flight ban (2010), the loss of road bridges in Workington, west Cumbria (2009-2010) and severe winter weather over most of the UK in December 2010. This report describes expectations of normal travel and how social practices reflect those expectations. It details the expectations travellers had about what should happen when travel is disrupted, how they 'touch the new travel context', revise their plans and the consequences for them and others. It reports on how travellers say it will change their expectations and practices for future trave

    Prospects in Britain in the light of the Bus Services Act 2017

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    The aim of this paper is not to document a specific research project, but to provide an international audience with an overview of the Bus Services Act 2017 in Britain in the light of the extensive experience of deregulation and privatisation within the British bus and coach industry since the early 1980s. It provides a range of powers, mostly permissive rather than mandatory. The general emphasis of the Act displays marked shift from the previous focus on competition as a major policy aim, to one in which partnerships between operators and local transport authorities are encouraged. Procedures for franchising are simplified, in contrast to those under the 2000 and 2008 Acts, which did not result in any franchising scheme outside London being introduced. The changes relate to a number of themes examined in previous Thredbo conferences, including aspects of competition law, service tendering, data disclosure and network planning. This paper begins by examining the historical background to the Act, then discusses its main provisions. Data requirements for research to monitor the possible effects of its implementation are outlined. It is concluded that the Act has the potential to encourage greater bus use, but the extent of this is highly uncertain. All views expressed are those of the author personally, and do not represent those of the British government or any other organisation
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