492,918 research outputs found

    Frequent mutation of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases provides a mechanism for STAT3 hyperactivation in head and neck cancer

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    The underpinnings of STAT3 hyperphosphorylation resulting in enhanced signaling and cancer progression are incompletely understood. Loss-of-function mutations of enzymes that dephosphorylate STAT3, such as receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases, which are encoded by the PTPR gene family, represent a plausible mechanism of STAT3 hyperactivation. We analyzed whole exome sequencing (n = 374) and reverse-phase protein array data (n = 212) from head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). PTPR mutations are most common and are associated with significantly increased phospho-STAT3 expression in HNSCC tumors. Expression of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase T (PTPRT) mutant proteins induces STAT3 phosphorylation and cell survival, consistent with a “driver” phenotype. Computational modeling reveals functional consequences of PTPRT mutations on phospho-tyrosine–substrate interactions. A high mutation rate (30%) of PTPRs was found in HNSCC and 14 other solid tumors, suggesting that PTPR alterations, in particular PTPRT mutations, may define a subset of patients where STAT3 pathway inhibitors hold particular promise as effective therapeutic agents.Fil: Lui, Vivian Wai Yan. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Peyser, Noah D.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Ng, Patrick Kwok-Shing. University Of Texas Md Anderson Cancer Center;Fil: Hritz, Jozef. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unidos. Masaryk University; RepĂșblica ChecaFil: Zeng, Yan. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Lu, Yiling. University Of Texas Md Anderson Cancer Center;Fil: Li, Hua. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados UnidosFil: Wang, Lin. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados UnidosFil: Gilbert, Breean R.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados UnidosFil: General, Ignacio. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados UnidosFil: Bahar, Ivet. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Ju, Zhenlin. University Of Texas Md Anderson Cancer Center;Fil: Wang, Zhenghe. Case Western Reserve University; Estados UnidosFil: Pendleton, Kelsey P.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados UnidosFil: Xiao, Xiao. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Du, Yu. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Vries, John K.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados UnidosFil: Hammerman, Peter S.. Harvard Medical School; Estados UnidosFil: Garraway, Levi A.. Harvard Medical School; Estados UnidosFil: Mills, Gordon B.. University Of Texas Md Anderson Cancer Center;Fil: Johnson, Daniel E.. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Grandis, Jennifer R.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unidos. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Estados Unido

    Fatty acid nitroalkenes ameliorate glucose intolerance and pulmonary hypertension in high-fat diet-induced obesity

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    Aims Obesity is a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, with the incidence of these disorders becoming epidemic. Pathogenic responses to obesity have been ascribed to adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction that promotes bioactive mediator secretion from visceral AT and the initiation of pro-inflammatory events that induce oxidative stress and tissue dysfunction. Current understanding supports that suppressing pro-inflammatory and oxidative events promotes improved metabolic and cardiovascular function. In this regard, electrophilic nitro-fatty acids display pleiotropic anti-inflammatory signalling actions. Methods and results It was hypothesized that high-fat diet (HFD)-induced inflammatory and metabolic responses, manifested by loss of glucose tolerance and vascular dysfunction, would be attenuated by systemic administration of nitrooctadecenoic acid (OA-NO2). Male C57BL/6j mice subjected to a HFD for 20 weeks displayed increased adiposity, fasting glucose, and insulin levels, which led to glucose intolerance and pulmonary hypertension, characterized by increased right ventricular (RV) end-systolic pressure (RVESP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). This was associated with increased lung xanthine oxidoreductase (XO) activity, macrophage infiltration, and enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure remained unaltered, indicating that the HFD produces pulmonary vascular remodelling, rather than LV dysfunction and pulmonary venous hypertension. Administration of OA-NO2 for the final 6.5 weeks of HFD improved glucose tolerance and significantly attenuated HFD-induced RVESP, PVR, RV hypertrophy, lung XO activity, oxidative stress, and pro-inflammatory pulmonary cytokine levels. Conclusions These observations support that the pleiotropic signalling actions of electrophilic fatty acids represent a therapeutic strategy for limiting the complex pathogenic responses instigated by obesity.Fil: Kelley, Eric E.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Baust, Jeff. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Bonacci, Gustavo Roberto. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unidos. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones CientĂ­ficas y TĂ©cnicas. Centro CientĂ­fico TecnolĂłgico CĂłrdoba. Centro de Investigaciones en BioquĂ­mica ClĂ­nica e InmunologĂ­a; ArgentinaFil: Golin Bisello, Franca. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Devlin, Jason E.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Croix, Claudette M. St.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Watkins, Simon C.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Gor, Sonia. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Cantu Medellin, Nadiezhda. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Weidert, Eric R.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Frisbee,Jefferson C.. University of Virginia; Estados UnidosFil: Gladwin, Mark T.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Champion, Hunter C.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Freeman, Bruce A.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Khoo, Nicholas K.H.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unido

    Experience of the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvnaia, USA

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    Role of estrogen related receptor beta (ESRRB) in DFN35B hearing impairment and dental decay

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    BACKGROUND: Congenital forms of hearing impairment can be caused by mutations in the estrogen related receptor beta (ESRRB) gene. Our initial linkage studies suggested the ESRRB locus is linked to high caries experience in humans. METHODS: We tested for association between the ESRRB locus and dental caries in 1,731 subjects, if ESRRB was expressed in whole saliva, if ESRRB was associated with the microhardness of the dental enamel, and if ESRRB was expressed during enamel development of mice. RESULTS: Two families with recessive ESRRB mutations and DFNB35 hearing impairment showed more extensive dental destruction by caries. Expression levels of ESRRB in whole saliva samples showed differences depending on sex and dental caries experience. CONCLUSIONS: The common etiology of dental caries and hearing impairment provides a venue to assist in the identification of individuals at risk to either condition and provides options for the development of new caries prevention strategies, if the associated ESRRB genetic variants are correlated with efficacy.Fil: Weber, Megan L.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Hsin, Hong Yuan. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Kalay, Ersan. Karadeniz Technical University; TurquĂ­aFil: BroĆŸkovĂĄ, Dana Ć . Charles University; RepĂșblica Checa. University Hospital Motol; RepĂșblica ChecaFil: Shimizu, Takehiko. Nihon University. School of Dentistry; JapĂłnFil: Bayram, Merve. Medipol Istanbul University; TurquĂ­aFil: Deeley, Kathleen. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: KĂŒchler, Erika C.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Forella, Jessalyn. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Ruff, Timothy D.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Trombetta, Vanessa M.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Sencak, Regina C.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Hummel, Michael. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Briseño Ruiz, Jessica. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Revu, Shankar K.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Granjeiro, JosĂ© M.. Universidade Federal Fluminense; BrasilFil: Antunes, Leonardo S.. Universidade Federal Fluminense; BrasilFil: Antunes, Livia A.. Universidade Federal Fluminense; BrasilFil: Abreu, Fernanda V.. Universidade Federal Fluminense; BrasilFil: Costabel, Marcelo C.. Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; BrasilFil: Tannure, Patricia N.. Veiga de Almeida University; Brasil. Salgado de Oliveira University; BrasilFil: Koruyucu, Mine. Istanbul University; TurquĂ­aFil: Patir, Asli. Medipol Istanbul University; TurquĂ­aFil: Poletta, Fernando AdriĂĄn. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones CientĂ­ficas y TĂ©cnicas. Oficina de CoordinaciĂłn Administrativa Parque Centenario. CEMIC-CONICET. Centro de Educaciones MĂ©dicas e Investigaciones ClĂ­nicas ; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones CientĂ­ficas y TĂ©cnicas; ArgentinaFil: Mereb, Juan C.. Estudio Colaborativo Latino Americano de Malformaciones CongĂ©nitas; ArgentinaFil: Castilla, Eduardo Enrique. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones CientĂ­ficas y TĂ©cnicas. Oficina de CoordinaciĂłn Administrativa Parque Centenario. CEMIC-CONICET. Centro de Educaciones MĂ©dicas e Investigaciones ClĂ­nicas ; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones CientĂ­ficas y TĂ©cnicas; ArgentinaFil: Orioli, IĂȘda M.. Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; BrasilFil: Marazita, Mary L.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Ouyang, Hongjiao. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Jayaraman, Thottala. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Seymen, Figen. Istanbul University; TurquĂ­aFil: Vieira, Alexandre R.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unido

    CLP LYNCS: Bringing a Library to the Pittsburgh Public Market

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    Libraries are evolving and always thinking of new and creative ways to reach customers. The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh devised a new initiative called the Library in Your Neighborhood, Community and School (LYNCS), and its first product was a new library service point located in the indoor Pittsburgh Public Market (PPM). The library service point was planned and launched in approximately four months after a unique collaboration with the nearby MLIS students at the University of Pittsburgh. The CLP-LYNCS: PPM was the first of its kind in Southwestern Pennsylvania. With its unique hours, it serves weekend patrons in a bustling Pittsburgh neighborhood that attracts users from all over the county

    Session 3: Natural Selection as a Causal Theory

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    Proceedings of the Pittsburgh Workshop in History and Philosophy of Biology, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, March 23-24 2001 Session 3: Natural Selection as a Causal Theor

    Session 4: Evolutionary Indeterminism

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    Proceedings of the Pittsburgh Workshop in History and Philosophy of Biology, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, March 23-24 2001 Session 4: Evolutionary Indeterminis

    Aquaporin 5 Interacts with Fluoride and Possibly Protects Against Caries

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    Aquaporins (AQP) are water channel proteins and the genes coding for AQP2, AQP5, and AQP6 are clustered in 12q13. Since AQP5 is expressed in serous acinar cells of salivary glands, we investigated its involvement in caries. DNA samples from 1,383 individuals from six groups were studied. Genotypes of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the aquaporin locus were tested for association with caries experience. Interaction with genes involved in enamel formation was tested. The association between enamel microhardness at baseline, after creation of artificial caries lesion, and after exposure to fluoride and the genetic markers in AQP5 was tested. Finally, AQP5 expression in human whole saliva, after exposure to fluoride in a mammary gland cell line, which is known to express AQP5, and in Wistar rats was also verified. Nominal associations were found between caries experience and markers in the AQP5 locus. Since these associations suggested that AQP5 may be inhibited by levels of fluoride in the drinking water that cause fluorosis, we showed that fluoride levels above optimal levels change AQP5 expression in humans, cell lines, and rats. We have shown that AQP5 is involved in the pathogenesis of caries and likely interact with fluoride.Fil: Anjomshoaa, Ida. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Briseño Ruiz, Jessica. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Deeley, Kathleen. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Poletta, Fernando AdriĂĄn. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones CientĂ­ficas y TĂ©cnicas. Oficina de CoordinaciĂłn Administrativa Parque Centenario. CEMIC-CONICET. Centro de Educaciones MĂ©dicas e Investigaciones ClĂ­nicas "Norberto Quirno". CEMIC-CONICET.; ArgentinaFil: Mereb, Juan C.. Provincia de RĂ­o Negro. Ministerio de Salud. Hospital de Área El BolsĂłn ; ArgentinaFil: Leite, Aline L.. Universidade de Sao Paulo; BrasilFil: Barreta, Priscila A. T.. Universidade de Sao Paulo; BrasilFil: Silva, Thelma L.. Universidade de Sao Paulo; BrasilFil: Dizak, Piper. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Ruff, Timothy. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Patir, Asli. Ä°stanbul Medipol Üniversitesi; TurquĂ­aFil: Koruyucu, Mine. Ä°stanbul Üniversitesi; TurquĂ­aFil: Abbasoğlu, Zerrin. Yeditepe Üniversitesi; TurquĂ­aFil: Casado, Priscila L.. Universidade Federal Fluminense; BrasilFil: Brown, Andrew. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Zaky, Samer H.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Bayram, Merve. Ä°stanbul Medipol Üniversitesi; TurquĂ­aFil: KĂŒchler, Erika C.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Cooper, Margaret E.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Liu, Kai. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Marazita, Mary L.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Tanboğa, Ä°lknur. Marmara Üniversitesi; TurquĂ­aFil: Granjeiro, JosĂ© M.. Universidade Federal Fluminense; Brasil. Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia; BrasilFil: Seymen, Figen. Ä°stanbul Üniversitesi; TurquĂ­aFil: Castilla, Eduardo Enrique. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones CientĂ­ficas y TĂ©cnicas. Oficina de CoordinaciĂłn Administrativa Parque Centenario. CEMIC-CONICET. Centro de Educaciones MĂ©dicas e Investigaciones ClĂ­nicas "Norberto Quirno". CEMIC-CONICET.; Argentina. FundaciĂłn Oswaldo Cruz; BrasilFil: Orioli, IĂȘda M.. Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; BrasilFil: Sfeir, Charles. University of Pittsburgh; Estados UnidosFil: Owyang, Hongjiao. Marmara Üniversitesi; TurquĂ­aFil: Rabelo Buzalaf, Marilia Afonso. Universidade de Sao Paulo; BrasilFil: Vieira, Alexandre R.. University of Pittsburgh; Estados Unido

    Session 5: Development, Neuroscience and Evolutionary Psychology

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    Proceedings of the Pittsburgh Workshop in History and Philosophy of Biology, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, March 23-24 2001 Session 5: Development, Neuroscience and Evolutionary Psycholog

    Session 2: Female Orgasms and Evolutionary Theory

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    Proceedings of the Pittsburgh Workshop in History and Philosophy of Biology, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, March 23-24 2001 Session 2: Female Orgasms and Evolutionary Theor
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