9,859 research outputs found

    The Pogrom Of 1905 In Odessa: A Case Study

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    Pogrom!

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    Published and printed by the six County Executive of Republican Clubs

    Menorah Review (No. 57, Winter, 2003)

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    Kishinev, 1903-2003 -- Kishinev 1903 -- Brief Reflections on Kishinev From Our Editors -- Crystal Night -- The City of Slaughter -- From The Children of the Warsaw Ghetto and Terezin … Fear, The Butterfly, My Father -- If I Forget... Can I? Dare I? -- Noteworthy Book

    Persecution perpetuated: The medieval origins of anti-semitic violence in Nazi Germany

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    How persistent are cultural traits? This paper uses data on anti-Semitism in Germany and finds continuity at the local level over more than half a millennium. When the Black Death hit Europe in 1348-50, killing between one third and one half of the population, its cause was unknown. Many contemporaries blamed the Jews. Cities all over Germany witnessed mass killings of their Jewish population. At the same time, numerous Jewish communities were spared these horrors. We use plague pogroms as an indicator for medieval anti-Semitism. Pogroms during the Black Death are a strong and robust predictor of violence against Jews in the 1920s, and of votes for the Nazi Party. In addition, cities that saw medieval anti-Semitic violence also had higher deportation rates for Jews after 1933, were more likely to see synagogues damaged or destroyed in the Night of Broken Glass in 1938, and their inhabitants wrote more anti-Jewish letters to the editor of the Nazi newspaper Der Stürmer.anti-semitic medieval origins, pogroms, Nazi Germany, Weimar Republic, persistence of anti-semitic attitudes, long-run effects of local culture

    World reactions to the 1961 Paris Pogrom

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    On 17 October 1961 a peaceful protest of Algerians in Paris, against a night-time curfew which applied only to them, was organised by the Féderation de France of the Front de Libération National (FLN), near the end of its guerrilla war against the French authorities in Algeria (1954-1962). The march was brutally repressed by the police, with somewhere in the region of 200 fatalities. Long a taboo subject in France, these events have recently been the subject of public controversy, notably during the 1997-98 trial of Maurice Papon, the Paris prefect of police in 1961, for crimes carried out during the Second World War; and in Papon's unsuccessful 1999 libel action against the author of a prominent book on the 1961 massacre, Jean-Luc Einaudi.2 This article aims to investigate the neglected subject of international responses to the 1961 massacre

    Skinheads in Ukraine : first symptoms?

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    New Perspectives on Kristallnacht: After 80 Years, the Nazi Pogrom in Global Comparison

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    On November 9 and 10, 1938, Nazi leadership unleashed an unprecedented orchestrated wave of violence against Jews in Germany, Austria, and the Sudetenland, supposedly in response to the assassination of a Nazi diplomat by a young Polish Jew, but in reality to force the remaining Jews out of the country. During the pogrom, Stormtroopers, Hitler Youth, and ordinary Germans murdered more than a hundred Jews (many more committed suicide) and ransacked and destroyed thousands of Jewish institutions, synagogues, shops, and homes. Thirty thousand Jews were arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps. Volume 17 of the Casden Annual Review includes a series of articles presented at an international conference titled “New Perspectives on Kristallnacht: After 80 Years, the Nazi Pogrom in Global Comparison.” Assessing events 80 years after the violent anti-Jewish pogrom of 1938, contributors to this volume offer new cutting-edge scholarship on the event and its repercussions. Contributors include scholars from the United States, Germany, Israel, and the United Kingdom who represent a wide variety of disciplines, including history, political science, and Jewish and media studies. Their essays discuss reactions to the pogrom by victims and witnesses inside Nazi Germany as well as by foreign journalists, diplomats, Jewish organizations, and Jewish print media. Several contributors to the volume analyze postwar narratives of and global comparisons to Kristallnacht, with the aim of situating this anti-Jewish pogrom in its historical context, as well as its place in world history.https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/purduepress_previews/1042/thumbnail.jp

    Jewish Youth in the Minsk Ghetto: How Age and Gender Mattered

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    Explores how young Soviet Jews survived the German occupation of Soviet territories, specifically ghettoization and mass murder

    Nurturing the pain: audiovisual tributes to the Holocaust on YouTube

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    This article examines how digital technology interacts with Holocaust remembrance in post-socialist countries. Using the Lviv pogrom of 1941 as a case study, it explores how Russophone and Ukrainophone web users engage with audiovisual tributes to this event on YouTube. The article scrutinizes user engagement with Holocaust memory on two levels: the level of representation (how the pogrom is represented on YouTube) and the level of interaction (how users interact with tributes to the pogrom). The article suggest that digital media can democratize existing memory practices, but it does not necessarily lead to more pluralist views on the past

    Антиєврейський погромний рух в Україні у 1919 році

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    Лазарович М. В. Антиєврейський погромний рух в Україні у 1919 році / М. В. Лазарович // Актуальні проблеми політики : зб. наук. пр. / редкол. : С. В. Ківалов (голов. ред.), Л. І. Кормич (заст. голов. ред.), Ю. П. Аленін [та ін.] ; МОНмолодьспорт України, НУ ОЮА. - Одеса : Фенікс, 2012. – Вип. 45. – С. 367-377.Intensity of development of the antiJewish pogrom movement in Ukraine during 1919 is tracked. Are certain the basic forces involved in its fulfi lment, and district of the largest displays. It is found out consequences of pogrom actions
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