19,150 research outputs found

    Visions of Infamy

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    Years of Infamy

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    Days of Infamy

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    Cabbage Heads and Gulps of Water: Hegel on the Terror

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    Noriega v. Activision/Blizzard: The First Amendment Right to Use a Historical Figure\u27s Likeness in Video Games

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    Panama’s former dictator, Manuel Noriega, recently sued Activision Blizzard in the California Superior Court for using his likeness and image in the popular video game “Call of Duty: Black Ops II.” In his complaint, Noriega alleged that the use of his likeness violated his right of publicity. Former New York Mayor, Rudy Giuliani, came to Activision’s defense, and filed a motion to dismiss, which was granted. In granting Activision’s motion, the court held that Activision’s use of Noriega’s likeness was transformative and did not violate his right of publicity. This Issue Brief argues that the California Superior Court should not have applied the transformative use test but should have held that Manuel Noriega did not have a right of publicity for his place in Panama’s history

    The Uncontacted as Third Infamy

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    This paper principally addresses the problem of anthropological thinking, that is, on how and why it remains with us and not with the peoples who do not subscribe to our contested regimes of truth. From my research on the topic, it appears we have not achieved any substantial moral progress on the question of exposure to indigenous otherness since the first European contact. This failure is primarily due to our hardheaded rationalist refusal to accept our inability to access the felt reality of the Other directly. Or, better still, of the failure of our language to obtain the shared reality of Being with perceived otherness. The access to realty discourse, so embedded in our modern notions of power and subjectivity, ends up with us talking only to ourselves and all those colonized into our way of thinking. At this stage of the infamy, we seem still to have remained oblivious to the potential of what anthropology can offer in the way of enhanced exposure to other forms of being human

    Flash of the Infamy: the Characters of A Universal History of Infamy

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    El presente artículo considera las implicaciones proyectadas por los personajes principales de Historia universal de la infamia de Jorge Luis Borges. Los siete protagonistas encarnan un patrón común en su travesía infame: explotan las herramientas del poder empleando palabras –discursos–, según la propuesta de Michel Foucault, a pesar de que estén “al otro lado de la ley”. Aunque condicionados por circunstancias histórico-culturales específicas, los héroes-antihéroes comparten la ejecución del mal (para conseguir el goce del poder) y el ascenso al pedestal pseudo-mítico posterior a la cúspide de su infamia. Una de las ideas centrales del artículo es que la tensión entre el mal –abyección– y la ascensión a la categoría del mito –sublimación– origina la descarga de la infamia y configura su imagen universal

    Romantic Code in Postcolonial Texts (based on the novel by John Maxwell Coetzee “Disgrace”

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    The article explores the interpretation of the creative heritage of romantic poets by the postcolonial author John Maxwell Coetzee. The South African writer uses the landmark works of the English romantics (Wordsworth, Byron) as a kind of guide / «key» to the penetration and deciphering of the complex realities of modernity in the novel «Infamy». The key turning points of the main character of the novel (encroachment, scandal, bad words) turn out to be a mirror image of the life and work of romantic poets. English romanticism is an important element of the novel «Infamy». He helps to build the plot structure of the work and allows to penetrate into the contradictory essence of modern man

    Baltimore on the Border: First Blood

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    In the study of the Civil War, the violence between brothers, neighbors, and countrymen is most frequently explored through the eyes of great armies clashing on the field of battle. But in the American Civil War, as in any modern conflict and especially those dividing a people amongst themselves, a citizen did not have to wear blue or grey to feel passionately about the war. In Baltimore, Mayor George William Brown and paper merchant Samuel Epes Turner, took strikingly different stances on the war despite their geographical proximity to the fighting. Fort Sumter may have seen the first shots of the war, but the infamy of first blood belongs to the civilians of Baltimore and the Union soldiers they confronted. [excerpt

    An ode to joy : a season of grief

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    Beethoven's Ninth in Bailey Hall the other evening, April 20, ending in an instant standing ovation by a clearly enchanted audience, was an unforgettable experience. And, like all such truly extraordinary events that are marked not only by artistic merit, but draw their power from the circumstances surrounding their creation or performance, it recalled others and enhanced their significance. I was reminded of a stellar performance on Christmas Day of 1989, only weeks after the unexpected fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, that haunting date in German history. Few people believed it would ever happen. But now, suddenly, reunification in justice and freedom, as the truncated old national anthem phrases it, was within reach
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